Critical Halloween: Holes

Graphic design by Fru★Fru (Rosana Galian + Paula Vilaplana)

 

Critical Halloween: Holes

 

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

9:30 pm – late

 

Museum of Sex

233 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

 

PURCHASE TICKETS HERE

  
#criticalhalloween     #holes     @storefrontnyc
 

Critical Halloween is a party, an intellectual debate, a costume competition, and a space for the expression of radical thought. The event brings people together through music, dance, and costume to engage in critical discussion in New York City.

 

Each year, Critical Halloween celebrates a feared ghost of art and architectural production. This year, we explore HOLES.

 

Holes appear to be made of nothing, and yet can be described by what takes place around, inside, and through them. In art and architecture, holes question our perceptions of matter and space, constructing, revealing, and inviting us to reflect upon what is real…and what is not. Scary.

 

We invite artists, architects, designers, poets, lawyers, and other holed beings to join us at the Museum of Sex explore the conceptual depths of HOLES through sartorial guise.

 

Critical Halloween is a space of reflection and action based upon the belief that critical ideas have a place within even the most seemingly carefree manifestations of our culture: the Halloween costume party.

 

Tickets

Tickets are available at various levels: Individual, Critical Committee, and Critical Firm. See here for more information and to purchase. Ticket prices will increase at the door.

 

Costume Competition
Each individual or group will have a chance to take a portrait photograph that will enter their costume into the competition. An international jury of renowned voices will select the best HOLE costumes in the following categories:
 
Best Individual Costume
Best Duo/Couple Costume
Best Group Costume
Best Overall Costume
 
In addition, online voting will take place to determine the People’s Choice award.
 

Party Bibliography

Need some inspiration for your costume? Please check back for a list of publications and articles on HOLES.

 

“I dug a deep hole in the basement of 112 Greene Street. What I wanted to do I didn’t accomplish at all, which was digging deep enough so that a person could see the actual foundations, the ‘removed’ spaces under the foundation, and liberate the building’s enormous compressive, confining forces simply by making a hole.” -Gordon Matta Clark

We Like America: New Icon-i-Cities

New Icon-i-Cities
As part of It’s Happening! Celebrating 50 Years of Public Art in NYC Parks
Saturday, October 21st from 11 am to 3 pm
Central Park’s East Pinetum (East 84th Street)
 
#spacebuster     #welikeamerica     @storefrontnyc     @ubermutproject     @raumlaborberlin
 

New Icon-i-Cities brings together critical approaches to the shifting and complex iconography of the city. Presented during Souvenirs: New New York Icons, currently on view at Storefront’s downtown gallery space, the event includes a series of talks and a workshop inside the Spacebuster.  

 

For the Souvenirs exhibition, Storefront has commissioned 59 artists to produce original objects that represent and redefine the collective imaginary for each of New York City’s 59 community boards.

 

During New Icon-i-Cities, participants of the show will present their ideas about what should constitute an icon of the city today. In parallel to these open discussions, raumlaborberlin, the creator of the Spacebuster, will lead a public workshop that invites visitors to produce their own iconography for their neighborhoods, inspiring new ways of perceiving the city of New York.

 

This event is part of We Like America, an experimental road trip of the Spacebuster, and takes place in the context of It’s Happening! Celebrating 50 Years of Public Art in NYC Parks.

 

About We Like America

We Like America, presented in partnership with Übermut Project, is an experimental road trip of the Spacebuster, a temporary architectural structure designed by raumlaborberlin and commissioned by Storefront in 2009 in order to transform public spaces into impromptu community zones.

 

Exploring facets of the “American Dream” and seeking out new urban frontiers by transforming nomadic, transgressive, and transitory spaces, the Spacebuster is reprised through We Like America in a journey of the American Rust Belt.

 

With a multifaceted mission that includes fact finding, observation, and research, We Like America will pop up to investigate and organize around issues of collective societal desire in everyday life. The road trip kicked off in Chicago during the preview week of the Chicago Architectural Biennale, and then worked its way east with pit stops in St. Louis, Cleveland, eventually arriving in New York in October.

 

Read more about We Like America, the Spacebuster, and all the events here.

 

About It’s Happening!

As NYC Parks’ public art program took shape in the 1960s, artistic events called “happenings” popped up in parks across the city. Blurring the line between art and everyday life, these fleeting performances combined sculpture, music, theater, dance, and poetry. They varied in size and sophistication, but always relied on audience participation. Since its creation in 1967, Art in the Parks has featured over 2,000 works of art. 

 

This year NYC Parks is celebrating the 50th anniversary of its Art in the Parks program. It’s Happening! celebrate this milestone with dynamic public artworks, hands-on workshops, and performances that transform Central Park into a stage, museum, and art studio for a free day of public art. Art lovers, families, and park-goers will be delighted by free art exhibits, performances, and hands-on art workshops in Central Park’s beautiful East Pinetum field.

 

Read more about It’s Happening! here.

We Like America: Spacebuster x Brooklyn Boheme

 
 We Like America: Spacebuster x Brooklyn Boheme
Saturday, October 14th from 12 pm to 10 pm
Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn (enter at Washington / Dekalb)
 
#spacebuster     #welikeamerica     @storefrontnyc     @ubermutproject     @raumlaborberlin
 
As part of We Like America, an experimental road trip through the American Rust Belt to New York, the Spacebuster will set up shop in Brooklyn’s Fort Greene Park for a day-long program beginning with a furniture building workshop. Community residents are invited to participate in building a chair, and can take home their creations. The chair-building exercise is part of GENERATOR, an ongoing prototyping experiment by raumlaborberlin, where community input from each workshop engenders a new model. Brooklyn residents will build the “Sedia Venezana,” developed in Venice during the Architecture Biennale, and the feedback from this workshop will be used in the future towards the “Brooklyn Boheme Chair.”
 
At dusk, Spacebuster will present an hour of curated short films by Hamburg- and Berlin-based independent filmmakers such as Baltic Raw, with films including Quick Animation (1989), an Eastern Bloc “Berlin-wall era” take on hip hop culture. This will be followed by a screening of Brooklyn Boheme, a love letter to Fort Greene’s past as a vibrant cultural mecca of the late 80s and early 90s. Filmmakers Nelson George and Diane Paragas will participate in a discussion moderated by writer and performer Carl Hancock Rux (who is also featured in the film).
 
The events are free, kid-friendly, and open to the public.
 
Event Schedule
12:00 pm: Furniture making workshop as part of GENERATOR
6:00 pm: Screening of short works by Hamburg- and Berlin-based independent filmmakers
7:30 pm: Screening of Brooklyn Boheme
8:45 pm: Discussion with filmmakers Nelson George and Diane Paragas, moderated by Carl Hancock Rux
 

About We Like America

We Like America, presented in partnership with Übermut Project, is an experimental road trip of the Spacebuster, a temporary architectural structure designed by raumlaborberlin and commissioned by Storefront in 2009 in order to transform public spaces into impromptu community zones.

 

Exploring facets of the “American Dream” and seeking out new urban frontiers by transforming nomadic, transgressive, and transitory spaces, the Spacebuster is reprised through We Like America in a journey of the American Rust Belt.

 

With a multifaceted mission that includes fact finding, observation, and research, We Like America will pop up to investigate and organize around issues of collective societal desire in everyday life. The road trip kicked off in Chicago during the preview week of the Chicago Architectural Biennale, and then worked its way east with pit stops in St. Louis, Cleveland, eventually arriving in New York in October.

 

Read more about We Like America, the Spacebuster, and all the events here.

Marching On: The Politics of Performance

 

Marching On: The Politics of Performance 

 

February 20th – April 7th, 2018

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

February 20th Exhibition Opening:

Press and Members Preview: 6 pm – 7 pm

Public Opening: 7 pm – 9 pm

 

#marchingon     #politicsofperformance     @storefrontnyc

 

Marching On: The Politics of Performance explores the legacy of marching and organized forms of performance. African-American marching bands have long been powerful agents of cultural and political expression, celebrating collective identities and asserting rights to public space and visibility. 

 

Bryony Roberts and Mabel O. Wilson collaborate with the Marching Cobras of New York, a Harlem-based after-school drum line and dance team in a new project that interweaves echoes of the 1917 Silent March against racial violence with references to the revered Harlem Hellfighters in order to celebrate the crucial role of the community’s collective performances as acts of both cultural expression and political resistance.

 

Marching On will be inaugurated with a series of performances presented by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance as part of Performa 17 in November 2017. The performances are free and open to the public. Read more about the performances here.

 

Rooted in military training exercises and even combat itself, marching bands and drumlines were historically used to acknowledge military service in African-American communities and the absence of civil rights despite sacrifices to defend the nation. These performance forms have radically expanded since the nineteenth century to include dance lines with hip-hop and stepping choreography, but they remain connected to a strong political lineage. The symbols, iconography, costumes, colors, and movement used throughout this history reflect various understandings of social and cultural perceptions and actions. Addressing both historical and contemporary meanings, this exhibition celebrates the medium of marching performance, focusing in particular on the power of such performance to articulate heritage at a moment of rapid change.

 

About the Artists

 

Bryony Roberts is an architectural designer and scholar. She earned a BA from Yale University and an MArch from Princeton University. Her work has been supported by the Graham Foundation and was featured in the 2015 Chicago Architecture Biennial. She has published widely in design and mainstream publications, and has taught at Rice University, SCI-Arc, and the Oslo School of Architecture. In 2015, she was awarded the Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome. Roberts’s practice integrates architecture, art, preservation, and performance to activate and critically engage historical buildings and urban spaces. With projects at sites such as Piazza del Campidoglio in Rome, Federal Plaza in Chicago, Government Quarter in Oslo, and Neutra VDL House in Los Angeles, her practice operates across many scales, from temporary installations to urban design. This range aims to foster social activation of historical sites and critical discourses on how we preserve and change existing structures.

 

Mabel O. Wilson navigates her transdisciplinary practice between the fields of architecture, art, and cultural history. She is a professor of architectural design and theory/history at Columbia University’s GSAPP, where she directs the graduate program in advanced architectural research. She co-directs GSAPP’s Global Africa Lab and the Project on Spatial Politics. She also holds an appointment as a senior fellow at the Institute for Research in African American Studies. Wilson’s design experiments, scholarly research, and advocacy projects focus upon space, politics and cultural memory in black America; raciality, technology, and aesthetics; and the globalization of architectural practice.

 

The Marching Cobras is a youth performance group based in Harlem that includes a 25-person drum line and a 25-person dance line. The Marching Cobras will be the lead artists involved in the performance and exhibition. Workshops with the group will guide the collaborative design of the live performances. Their mission is to “enrich lives of youth by providing opportunities for artistic expression and leadership development through music, marching band, step, dance, and much more.”

 

________

 

Marching On: The Politics of Performance is commissioned by Storefront for Art and Architecture.

 

Exhibition Team

Curator: Eva Franch

Associate Curator: Carlos Mínguez Carrasco

Strategic Development: Jinny Khanduja

Programs Producer: Max Lauter

 

Project Support

Marching On: The Politics of Performance is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, and the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

 

General Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

Photo: The Marching Cobras’ drum line in Harlem, 2014. Courtesy of Carlo Allegri/Reuters.

Marching On Performance

 

Marching On Performance

Marcus Garvey ParkHarlem (enter at 122nd St. and Madison Avenue)

Presented by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance as part of Performa 17

 

Saturday, November 11th, 2017

 

Sunday, November 12th, 2017

 

#marchingon     #politicsofperformance     #performa17     @storefrontnyc

 

Marching On: The Politics of Performance is a project commissioned by Storefront that explores the legacy of marching and organized forms of performance. African-American marching bands have long been powerful agents of cultural and political expression, celebrating collective identities and asserting rights to public space and visibility.

 

Bryony Roberts and Mabel O. Wilson collaborate with the Marching Cobras of New York, a Harlem-based after-school drum line and dance team in a new project that interweaves echoes of the 1917 Silent March against racial violence with references to the revered Harlem Hellfighters in order to celebrate the crucial role of the community’s collective performances as acts of both cultural expression and political resistance.

 

Marching On will be inaugurated with a series of performances presented by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance as part of Performa 17. The performances are free and open to the public.

 

A subsequent exhibition will be presented at Storefront’s gallery space in early 2018. Read more about the exhibition here.

 

________

 

 

Project Team

Artists: Bryony Roberts and Mabel O. Wilson in collaboration with the Marching Cobras of New York

Curator: Eva Franch

Associate Curator: Carlos Mínguez Carrasco

Strategic Development: Jinny Khanduja

Programs Producer: Max Lauter

 

Marching On: The Politics of Performance is commissioned by Storefront for Art and Architecture.

 

Project Support

Marching On: The Politics of Performance is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, and the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

 

General Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

Photo: Marching Cobras rehearsal for Marching On, Marcus Garvey Park, Spring 2017. Courtesy of Storefront for Art and Architecture.

We Like America: In Response to Hurricanes

In Response to Hurricanes

As part of We Like America: An Experimental Road Trip by Spacebuster

 

Wednesday, October 4th, 2017 at 6:30 pm

La Plaza @ The Clemente / 114 Norfolk Street

 

#welikeamerica    #spacebuster    @storefrontnyc    @ubermutproject    @raumlaborberlin

 

Spacebuster’s We Like America tour touched down in Chicago, St. Louis, Cleveland, and now stops in New York City. Its first NYC event takes place at The Clemente, where the discussion focuses on how art and architecture deal with issues of resilience and respond to natural disasters.

 

Addressing issues of migration, the recent humanitarian crisis in the Mediterranean, and the role of architecture in the response to natural disasters, In Response to Hurricanes features writer and architecture critic Niklas Maak, who will present his take on “emergency architecture,” followed by responses from Amy Chester, Director of Rebuild by Design, and Marcelo López-Dinardi, who trained as an architect in Puerto Rico. The responses, moderated by Carlos Mínguez Carrasco, contextualize the conversation around the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

 

This event is part of We Like America, a tour of the Spacebuster that seeks to explore various facets of urban American life.

 

We Like America is an initiative of raumlaborberlin in collaboration with Storefront for Art and Architecture, enabled by Übermut Project, 2017. Übermut Project is an initiative of visitBerlin and Hamburg Marketing, funded by the German Foreign Office. 

 

About the Participants:

 

Niklas Maak

Niklas Maak, born in 1972 in Hamburg, is an architecture theoretician working in Berlin, the arts editor of Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, and currently teaching at Harvard GSD. Since 2002, he has pursued parallel careers as a writer, educator, newspaper editor, architect, and visiting professor. Maak studied art history, philosophy and architecture in Hamburg and Paris. He completed a maîtrise in 1996, studying with Jacques Derrida, on the question of the threshold, and his PhD on the work of Le Corbusier and Paul Valery in 1998, with Martin Warnke at Hamburg University. Since then, he has undertaken continuous research on the history of mass housing, and models to re-engage with communal dwelling and collective housing.

 

He was a visiting professor for the history and theory of architecture at Städel Schule, Frankfurt, and has taught and lectured at the Universities of Basel, Berlin and Buenos Aires. In 2013, he co-designed and programmed, together with A77 and Pedro Gadanho of New York’s MoMA, an experimental, temporary, minimal collective dwelling structure, the Colony at MoMA PS1, in Queens. In 2014, he worked with Rem Koolhaas’ Biennial team as a consultant, and contributor.

 

For his essays, Maak has been awarded the George F. Kennan Prize (2009), the Henri Nannen Prize in Germany (2012) and the COR Prize for architectural critique (2014). His most recent publications include Le Corbusier: the Architect on the Beach, and Wohnkomplex, an investigation of the effects of fundamental technological, demographic and societal changes on housing, and The Living Complex, which researches concepts for a post-familial collective architecture.

 

Raumlaborberlin

Founded in 1999, raumlaborberlin acts at the intersection of architecture, city planning, art and urban intervention. Their work addresses forms of urban renewal in process. Urban locations that are torn between different systems, time periods or planning ideologies are of particular interest for the group.

 

Amy Chester

Amy Chester is the Managing Director for Rebuild by Design, an organization formed to run the Hurricane Sandy Design Competition, which resulted in over $1 billion in awards from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development to seven projects to address structural and social vulnerabilities in the New York region. Rebuild is now working in nine cities around the world, applying the same model of collaborative research and design to challenges of all sizes.

 

Amy brings over 20 years in municipal policy, community engagement, real estate development and communications to advocate for the urban environment. As Rebuild’s Managing Director, Amy is responsible the organization’s day-to-day operations, management and strategic direction.

 

Marcelo López-Dinardi

Marcelo López-Dinardi is an architect and educator based in New York interested in architecture and political economy. His writings have been published in The Avery Review, The Architect’s Newspaper and GSAPP Books, among others. As Partner of A(n) Office, a design and curatorial practice, he has exhibited at the US Pavilion in the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale and MoCAD in Detroit. He has taught at Barnard + Columbia, NJIT, Penn Design, RISD and Pratt. He is currently working on a research project about the spatial impact of Puerto Rico’s fiscal debt. Selected works can be found at www.marcelolopezdinardi.com.

 

 

About the Location:

 

The Clemente

The Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural and Educational Center Inc. (The Clemente) is a Puerto Rican/Latino cultural institution that has demonstrated a broad-minded cultural vision and a collaborative philosophy. While the Clemente’s mission is focused on the cultivation, presentation, and preservation of Puerto Rican and Latino culture, it is equally determined to operate in a multi-cultural and inclusive manner, housing and promoting artists and performance events that fully reflect the cultural diversity of the Lower East Side and the city as a whole.

Letters to the Mayor: Rotterdam

Letters to the Mayor: Rotterdam

January 15th, 2018 – February 1st, 2018 

Het Nieuwe Instituut

 

#letterstothemayor     #letterstothemayorrotterdam     @storefrontnyc

 

Storefront presents Letters to the Mayor: Rotterdam as part of the global Letters to the Mayor project. Each iteration presents a collection of letters by more than 100 architects, addressing the most pressing issues facing their city.

 

Letters to the Mayor: Rotterdam invites architects to write to Mayor Ahmed Aboutaleb. Stay tuned for more information about participants.

 

See here and below for more information about the overall project and other iterations.

 

 

PROJECT TEAM

 

Local Curators

Marten Kuijpers, Marina Otero, and Michiel Raats

 

 

ABOUT LETTERS TO THE MAYOR

 

Letters to the Mayor is an itinerant exhibition that displays real letters written by architects to their city mayors. Initiated by Storefront for Art and Architecture in 2014, the project has traveled to more than 15 cities across the globe, including Bogota, Mexico City, Athens, Panama City, Taipei, Mariupol, Madrid, Lisbon, and Buenos Aires, among others. 

 

Letters to the Mayor invites 100 architects in each city to write a letter to their mayor as a means of bringing innovative ideas and visions of the city closer to the decision-makers, and vice versa.

 

Throughout history, architects have engaged with this responsibility and the structures of economic, political, and cultural power in different ways and with varying degrees of success. With the rise of globalization and the homogenization of the contemporary city, the role of the architect in the political arena has often been relegated to answering questions that others have asked. 

 

Letters to the Mayor questions this dynamic, and invites local and global architects to deliver their thoughts directly to the desks of elected officials, and simultaneously into the public consciousness.

Letters to the Mayor: Nashville

Letters to the Mayor: Nashville

November 30th, 2017 – February 3rd, 2018

Nashville Civic Design Center

 

#letterstothemayor     #letterstothemayornashville     @storefrontnyc

 

Storefront presents Letters to the Mayor: Nashville as part of the global Letters to the Mayor project. Each iteration presents a collection of letters by more than 100 architects, addressing the most pressing issues facing their city.

 

Letters to the Mayor: Nashville invites architects to write to Mayor Megan Barry. Stay tuned for more information about participants.

 

See here and below for more information about the overall project and other iterations.

 

 

PROJECT TEAM

 

Local Curator

Laura Cavaliere

 

 

ABOUT LETTERS TO THE MAYOR

 

Letters to the Mayor is an itinerant exhibition that displays real letters written by architects to their city mayors. Initiated by Storefront for Art and Architecture in 2014, the project has traveled to more than 15 cities across the globe, including Bogota, Mexico City, Athens, Panama City, Taipei, Mariupol, Madrid, Lisbon, and Buenos Aires, among others.

 

Letters to the Mayor invites 100 architects in each city to write a letter to their mayor as a means of bringing innovative ideas and visions of the city closer to the decision-makers, and vice versa.

 

Throughout history, architects have engaged with this responsibility and the structures of economic, political, and cultural power in different ways and with varying degrees of success. With the rise of globalization and the homogenization of the contemporary city, the role of the architect in the political arena has often been relegated to answering questions that others have asked. 

 

Letters to the Mayor questions this dynamic, and invites local and global architects to deliver their thoughts directly to the desks of elected officials, and simultaneously into the public consciousness.

Letters to the Mayor: Valparaiso

Letters to the Mayor: Valparaiso

October 26th – November 10th, 2017

XX Chilean Architecture and Urbanism Biennial

 

#letterstothemayor     #letterstothemayorvalparaiso     @storefrontnyc

 

In collaboration with the XX Chilean Architecture and Urbanism Biennial, Storefront presents Letters to the Mayor: Valparaiso as part of the global Letters to the Mayor project. Each iteration presents a collection of letters by more than 100 architects, addressing the most pressing issues facing their city.

 

Letters to the Mayor: Valparaiso invites architects to write to Mayor Jon Costas. 

 

See here and below for more information about the overall project and other iterations.

 

 

Participants
Alberto Texido, Alejandra Celedón, Boris Ivelic, Carolina Katz, Edward Rojas, Felipe Assadi, Francisco Díaz, Gabriel Rudolphy, Genaro Cuadros, Guillermo Hevia, Javier Contreras, Natalia Escudero, Nicolás Stutzin, AOA, Pedro Serrano, Pía Montealegre, Piera Medina, Rayna Razmilic, Víctor Gubbins, Rodolfo Montt, Carolina Sepúlveda, Sebastián Gray, Nina Hormazábal, Joaquín Bustamante, Germán del Sol, Sandra Iturriaga (list in formation)
 

Local Curators

Pola Mora and Danae Santibáñez

 

Mayoral Desk / Architect’s Table / Wallpaper Design 
Constanza Alarcón Tennen 
 

 

ABOUT LETTERS TO THE MAYOR

 

Letters to the Mayor is an itinerant exhibition that displays real letters written by architects to their city mayors. Initiated by Storefront for Art and Architecture in 2014, the project has traveled to more than 15 cities across the globe, including Bogota, Mexico City, Athens, Panama City, Taipei, Mariupol, Madrid, Lisbon, and Buenos Aires, among others.

 

Letters to the Mayor invites 100 architects in each city to write a letter to their mayor as a means of bringing innovative ideas and visions of the city closer to the decision-makers, and vice versa.

 

Throughout history, architects have engaged with this responsibility and the structures of economic, political, and cultural power in different ways and with varying degrees of success. With the rise of globalization and the homogenization of the contemporary city, the role of the architect in the political arena has often been relegated to answering questions that others have asked. 

 

Letters to the Mayor questions this dynamic, and invites local and global architects to deliver their thoughts directly to the desks of elected officials, and simultaneously into the public consciousness.

Letters to the Mayor: Toronto

Letters to the Mayor: Toronto

September 28th – October 28th, 2017

Don Valley Parkway

Lakeshore Blvd East

 

#letterstothemayor     #letterstothemayortoronto     @storefrontnyc

 

Storefront presents Letters to the Mayor: Toronto as part of the global Letters to the Mayor project. Each iteration presents a collection of letters by more than 100 architects, addressing the most pressing issues facing their city.

 

Letters to the Mayor: Toronto invites architects to write to Mayor John Tory:

 

Participants

Jodi Batay-Csorba, Shirley Blumberg, Allen Chan, Johnson Chou, Peter Clewes, Tye Farrow, Steven Fong, Andrew Frontini, Gensler, Valerie Gow, Meg Graham, Ken Greenberg, Hans Ibelings, Nima Javidi, Ted Kesik, Les Klein, Lateral Office, Janna Levitt, David Lieberman, Joe Lobko, Frances Martin-DiGiuseppe, Michael McLellan, Terri Meyer Boake, Anya Moryoussef, Alissa North, Office Ou, Pina Petricone, Adrian Phiffer, Plant Architect Inc., Gianpiero Pugliese, Colin Ripley, Roland Rom Colthoff, Janet Rosenberg, John Shnier, Richard Sommer, Mark Sterling, Studio AC, Dermot J. Sweeny, Michael Taylor, Victoria Taylor, Megan Torza, Williamson Williamson, Richard Witt

 

 

PROJECT TEAM

 

Local Curator

Partisans

 

Mayoral Desk / Architect’s Table Design

Partisans

 

Wallpaper Design

Gary Taxali

 

 

ABOUT LETTERS TO THE MAYOR

 

Letters to the Mayor is an itinerant exhibition that displays real letters written by architects to their city mayors. Initiated by Storefront for Art and Architecture in 2014, the project has traveled to more than 15 cities across the globe, including Bogota, Mexico City, Athens, Panama City, Taipei, Mariupol, Madrid, Lisbon, and Buenos Aires, among others. See here for a list of iterations.  

 

Letters to the Mayor invites 100 architects in each city to write a letter to their mayor as a means of bringing innovative ideas and visions of the city closer to the decision-makers, and vice versa.

 

Throughout history, architects have engaged with this responsibility and the structures of economic, political, and cultural power in different ways and with varying degrees of success. With the rise of globalization and the homogenization of the contemporary city, the role of the architect in the political arena has often been relegated to answering questions that others have asked. 

 

Letters to the Mayor questions this dynamic, and invites local and global architects to deliver their thoughts directly to the desks of elected officials, and simultaneously into the public consciousness.

 

OPENING EVENT: BOOM GOES THE CITY: DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT IN TORONTO

Saturday, September 30, 12:30 – 1:30pm

While rapid densification is contributing to Toronto’s prosperity and vibrancy, the unbridled development of homogeneous condo towers is resulting in a significant facelift to the city’s skyline and streetscape. Are we doing our collective best to create the kinds of buildings, housing options, and at-grade experiences our citizens need and deserve? Join Toronto’s outgoing Chief City Planner Jennifer Keesmaat, Brandon Donnelly (Slate), Alex Josephson (PARTISANS), and Jay Pitter (Author + Placemaker) for a conversation in the Funnel Room, home to Letters to the Mayor / Developer: Toronto.

Moderator: Eva Franch i Gilabert, Chief Curator and Executive Director, Storefront for Art and Architecture

Panelists: Jennifer Keesmaat, Toronto’s outgoing Chief City Planner Brandon Donnelly, VP of Development, Slate Alex Josephson, Cofounder, PARTISANS Jay Pitter, Author + Placemaker