Member’s Event: Guided Tour of Public Space in a Private Time with Justin Beal

Public Space in a Private Time: Building Storefront for Art and Architecture, 2022. 
Photo by Michael Oliver.

 

Wednesday, November 16

6:30pm 

97 Kenmare St, New York, NY

 
Join us for a guided tour with artist Justin Beal as he walks us through our 40th-anniversary exhibition Public Space in a Private Time: Building Storefront for Art and Architecture.
 
This exhibition connects our focus on the built environment with New York City’s social and political challenges at the time of its founding in 1982. Through a close reading of early shows and projects, Public Space in a Private Time showcases the leading role Storefront has played in the defense of public space through artistic practice. 
 
Justin Beal is an artist and writer based in New York. His first book, Sandfuture, was published by the MIT Press in September 2021. Beal was a co-organizer of Public Space in a Private Time and will lead a small group of Storefront members in an intimate conversation around the show.
 
If you would like to join and are not yet a Storefront member, please sign up here, or contact us at membership@storefrontnews.org.
 
Note to members: This event has limited capacity. Please RSVP by Friday November 11.
 

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Support 

Storefront’s 40th Anniversary program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

People’s Gardens: Walking Tour with the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space


Adam’s House in Paradise, 1984. Photo by Glenn Weiss. Storefront for Art and Architecture.

 

Saturday, November 12

2:30pm – 4pm

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

[RSVP]

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture, in partnership with the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space, invites you to join a walking tour of community gardens in Lower Manhattan. Led by Bill Di Paola and Marco Lanier from MoRUS, the walk will begin at Storefront’s gallery at 97 Kenmare Street and will culminate at La Plaza Cultural on East 9th Street in the East Village, meandering through six other sites along the route. Each of these gardens hold historical and political significance as places of resistance in the struggles against increasing real estate expansion and austerity. Stops include:
 
1. Elizabeth Street Garden
2. Liz Christy Garden
3. Garden of Eden Site
4. Children’s Magical Garden
5. 6B Garden
6. Carmen’s Garden
7. La Plaza Cultural
 
As a living history of urban activism, the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space (MoRUS) chronicles the East Village community’s history of grassroots action. It celebrates the local activists who transformed abandoned spaces and vacant lots into vibrant community spaces and gardens. Many of these innovative, sustainable concepts and designs have since spread out to the rest of the city and beyond.

 

This event has a limited capacity. Please RSVP to join us for this special afternoon.

 

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Support 

Storefront’s 40th Anniversary program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

Members Event: The Architects by Amie Seigel at The Museum of Modern Art

Amie Siegel, The Architects, 2014. © 2014 Amie Siegel

 

Tuesday, October 25

4:30pm 

The Museum of Modern Art

11 W 53rd St, New York, NY

 

[RSVP]

 

Join us for a viewing of The Architects with artist Amie Siegel at The Museum of Modern Art. As a special event for our Storefront Members, Siegel will host an intimate conversation around this piece. 
 
The Architects, originally commissioned by Storefront for the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale as part of OfficeUS, is a film that cuts transversely through the city of New York, moving through ten architecture studios, unveiling the operational territories and landscapes of global architecture production. The piece was recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art and is currently on view in the Philip Johnson Galleries. 
 
If you would like to join and are not yet a Storefront member, please sign up here, or contact us at members@storefrontnews.org.
 
Note to members: This event has limited capacity. Please RSVP by Friday, October 21st
 
Amie Siegel works variously in film, video, photography, sound, sculpture, and installation. She is known for her meticulously constructed works that trace and perform systems of value, examine relationships between objects, materials, and spaces, and expose the plasticity of the moving image through sound and performance. The artist’s current and recent exhibitions include The Silence, ArkDes, Stockholm (2022); Bloodlines, Scottish National Museum Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh (2022); 34th São Paulo Biennial, Brazil; (2021); Medium Cool, Blaffer Art Museum, Houston (2019); Winter, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (2017); Strata, South London Gallery (2017), Double Negative, Museum Villa Stuck, Munich (2016) and Ricochet, Kunstmuseum Stuttgart (2016). Siegel has been a fellow of the DAAD Berliner-Künstlerprogramm and the Guggenheim Foundation and a 2021 Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants to Artists award recipient. She lives and works in New York City.

Artist Talk: Tehching Hsieh – One Year Performance (1981-1982)

Wednesday, October 26

6:30pm – 8pm

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

[RSVP]

 

In the context of our 40th anniversary exhibition Public Space in a Private Time, artist Tehching Hsieh will share his experiences about One Year Performance (1981-1982). This seminal durational performance, where he spent an entire year living outdoors, concluded during Storefront’s inaugural program Performance A-Z in 1982.
 
This conversation by Hsieh, in dialogue with Storefront’s director José Esparza Chong Cuy, is an opportunity to delve deeper into the year preceding the opening of Storefront. Hsieh and his work offer a window into the politics of public space around the Lower Manhattan of that era.
 
For this particular performance, Hsieh spent a full year living outside and moving around New York while documenting his daily experience. He pledged never to enter any building or form of shelter during the entire duration of the piece. 
 
Performance A-Z was organized by Storefront’s founders, Kyong Park and R.L. Seltman, and artist Arleen Schloss, as a 26-day sequence of performances by New York-based artists — one for each letter of the alphabet. On the ninth evening, corresponding with letter I, Storefront’s community gathered outside of Hsieh’s apartment to witness the conclusion of his year-long performance piece. 
 
Please RSVP to join us for this special evening.

 

Tehching Hsieh was born in 1950 in Nan-Chou, Taiwan. Hsieh dropped out from high school in 1967 and took up painting. After finishing compulsory military service (1970-73), Hsieh had his first solo show at the gallery of the American News Bureau in Taiwan. Shortly after this solo show, Hsieh stopped painting. He made a performance action, Jump, in which he broke both of his ankles. He trained as a seaman, which he then used as a means to enter the United States. In July of 1974, Hsieh arrived at a small port near Philadelphia. He was an illegal immigrant in the States for fourteen years until granted amnesty in 1988.    

 

Starting in the late 1970s, Hsieh made five One Year Performances and a Thirteen Year Plan’, inside and outside his studio in New York City. Using long durations, making art and life simultaneous, Hsieh achieved one of the most radical approaches in contemporary art. The first four One Year Performances made Hsieh a regular name in the art scene in New York; the last two pieces, intentionally retreating from the art world, set a tone of sustained invisibility. Since the Millennium, released from the restriction of not showing his works during the thirteen-year period, Hsieh has exhibited his work in North and South America, Asia and Europe. Hsieh recent exhibitions Doing Time was presented by Taiwan Pavilion at 57th Venice Art Biennale 2017, One Year Performance 1980-981 was exhibited at Tate Modern, London, in 2017-2018, and MoMa and Guggenheim Museum, New York, in 2009.

 

Tehching Hsieh lives in Brooklyn, New York.

 

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Support 

Storefront’s 40th Anniversary program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

Public Space In A Private Time

Public Space In A Private Time: Building Storefront for Art and Architecture
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Exhibition Opening:
Saturday, September 17th from 4–6 pm [RSVP]

 

Gallery Hours:
Wednesdays – Saturdays, 12-6 pm
September 17th–December 10th, 2022

 

#publicspaceinaprivatetime   @storefrontnyc  

 

The establishment of certain spaces in the city as “public” is a reminder, a warning, that the rest of the city isn’t public.
— Vito Acconci, 1990

 

On the occasion of the gallery’s 40th anniversary, Public Space in a Private Time: Building Storefront for Art and Architecture connects our focus on the built environment with New York City’s social and political challenges at the time of its founding in 1982. Through a close reading of early shows and projects, the exhibition showcases the leading role Storefront has played in the defense of public space through artistic practice.

 

Using our own archive as its main resource, Public Space in a Private Time foregrounds Storefront’s early preoccupation with the dominance of private interests in the public sphere, as well as with the accelerated pace of urban development, gentrification, and displacement. All these issues were of deep concern in New York City during those years, and continue, urgently, to require attention today—both here and around the world.

 

Taking its title from an essay presented at Storefront in 1990 by artist Vito Acconci, the exhibition highlights the role this organization has long played in positioning art and architecture at the center of public life. It focuses on key exhibitions, competitions, and open calls that have been instrumental in the shaping of Storefront’s ethos, and includes a section about the making of the iconic facade by Acconci and architect Steven Holl from 1993, which continues to embody our mission as an enduring public artwork in Lower Manhattan.

 

The exhibition Public Space in a Private Time is presented as part of Storefront’s 40th anniversary and will be accompanied by a series of events that examine moments of resistance against the erasure of civic space in New York City.

 

Credits

 

Public Space in a Private Time: Building Storefront for Art and Architecture is part of an anniversary initiative that studies the organization’s early history to inform future programs. The exhibition is collectively organized by Storefront’s staff with artist and board member Justin Beal. Graphic design by Pentagram.

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture Team:

José Esparza Chong Cuy, Executive Director and Chief Curator

Jessica Kwok, Curatorial Fellow

Eduardo Meneses, Gallery and Operations Manager

Andrea Molina Cuadro, Gallery and Exhibitions Fellow

Guillermo Ruiz de Teresa, Curator of Programs and Public Affairs

 

Support

 

Storefront’s 40th Anniversary program has been made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

      

Guided Tour: The Absolute Restoration of All Things

Wednesday, May 4th, 2022
6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY
 

RSVPs are kindly encouraged for this event.

 
 
 

Join us for a guided tour with artist Miguel Fernández de Castro and anthropologist Natalia Mendoza as they walk us through their exhibition The Absolute Restoration of All Things at Storefront. 

 

The exhibition unfolds from a 2014 lawsuit that shut down the operations of a gold mine in the Sonoran Desert in the northwest of Mexico. This groundbreaking case, brought to court by the “ejidatarios” (communal land holders) of the mining site claiming that their territory was illegally occupied and exploited, ruled that the mining company was “obliged to fully restore the ecosystem that prevailed in this place, with its hills, mountains, waters, air, flora, and fauna that existed before.”

 

For the event, Fernández de Castro and Mendoza will contextualize the objects on display to hone in on land rights and the limits of the legal language that is meant to protect it. Concepts like the “ejido”, and other forces unique to this territory, will be discussed. 

 

About the Exhibition

The Absolute Restoration of All Things was commissioned by Storefront for Art and Architecture and presents a new film, a sculpture, a photomural, diagrams, and objects from the mining site. Together, these works present a panoramic picture of the expansive devastation caused by the mining industry, alongside the unattainable legal verdict that aims to restore this particular part of the Sonoran Desert.
 
RSVP for the event here.
 
Read more about the exhibition here.
 
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Support
The Absolute Restoration of All Things is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and Fundación Jumex.
 
Building Cycles has been made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, as well as from DS+R; KPF; Steven Holl Architects; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

The Absolute Restoration of All Things

The Absolute Restoration of All Things
By Miguel Fernández de Castro & Natalia Mendoza
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Exhibition Opening:
Friday, April 8th from 6:30–8:30 pm [RSVP]

 

Gallery Hours:
Wednesdays – Saturdays, 12-6 pm
April 8th–July 30th, 2022

 

#absoluterestoration  @miguelfernandezdecastro  @mendozarockwell   @storefrontnyc  

 

In the middle of the vast Sonoran desert in the northwest of Mexico, a sculpture sits within the deep pit of a decommissioned gold mine. Made on-site with soil from the pit, the sculpture is shaped as a perfect cube. Beside it sits a silver plaque that reads:

 

Between 2010 and 2013, the Penmont Mining company illegally extracted 236,709 ounces of gold, according to its own reports. To do this, they blew up and moved 10,833,527 tons of stone. 

 

The decision of the Unitary Agrarian Court of the 28th District, issued on December 8th, 2014, obliges Penmont to return the extracted gold, which would take the shape of a 70 x 70 x 70 centimeter cube and would have a value of 436 million dollars. 

Ejido El Bao

February 2022

 

The contrast in scales between the small volume of the sculpture in relation to the massive open pit clearly showcases the environmental damage caused by the mining industry. This sculpture and its accompanying plaque function as an anti-monument to the site’s dispossession. They are part of the exhibition The Absolute Restoration of All Things by artist Miguel Fernández de Castro and anthropologist Natalia Mendoza at Storefront for Art and Architecture. 

 

For the last five years, Fernández de Castro and Mendoza—who are based in the Sonoran Desert—have been researching the 2014 court case that shut down Penmont’s mining operations. The lawsuit was brought to court by the “ejidatarios” (communal land holders) of the mining site, who claimed that their territory was illegally occupied and exploited, causing an irrevocable environmental impact on their land. In addition to the return of the extracted gold, the court ruled that Penmont Mining is “obliged to fully restore the ecosystem that prevailed in this place, with its hills, mountains, waters, air, flora, and fauna that existed before.” Not only has Penmont Mining not complied with the court ruling, but the ejidatarios continue to suffer from arbitrary imprisonment, harassment, and forced disappearance in a context of intertwined state and criminal violence. 

 

The Absolute Restoration of All Things departs from the impossibility of this historic legal verdict to explore the issue of land rights and the limits of the legal language that protects it. 

 

The exhibition at Storefront presents newly commissioned works by Fernández de Castro and Mendoza that unpack the court case, including a film, diagrams, a photo mural, and objects from the mine. The formwork used to create the rammed earth sculpture inside the open pit is also included, allowing the viewer to grasp the scale and connect the two sites. Together, these works present a panoramic picture of the expansive devastation caused by the mining industry, alongside the unattainable legal verdict that aims to restore this particular part of the Sonoran Desert.

 

RSVP for the public opening here.

 

About the Artist

Miguel Fernández de Castro (b. 1986, Sonora, Mexico) is a visual artist based in the Sonora-Arizona borderlands. Through photography, video, sculpture, and writing, his work examines how extractive and criminal economies materially transform a territory while looking at the historical ties between environmental catastrophe, smuggling routes, and forced disappearance. In Mexico, his work has been shown at Museo Jumex, Casa del Lago, and Museo de Arte Moderno. Internationally he’s presented work at Frac Centre-Val de Loire (France), Spazio Veda (Italy), Wren Library (UK), Museo Artium (Spain), Ashkal Alwan (Lebanon), among others. His film Grammar of Gates was selected by Ballroom Marfa to be for the Artists’ Film International program at Whitechapel Gallery in London. Since 2018 he has collaborated with multiple search groups documenting mass graves on both sides of the Mexico-US border.

 

​​Natalia Mendoza, (b. 1981, Mexico City, Mexico) is a researcher and essayist based between New York and Sonora, Mexico. She obtained a PhD in anthropology from Columbia University and joined Fordham University as an assistant professor. She has conducted extensive ethnographic research in the region of Sonora-Arizona. Her work examines the convergence of legal and illegal economies, and the overlaps between state and criminal violence in the US-Mexico borderlands. In 2020, Natalia Mendoza won the “José Revueltas-INBA National Essay Award” for her collection of essays on disappearance, funerary rituals, and political imagination.

 

Building Cycles

The Absolute Restoration of All Things is presented as part of Building Cycles, Storefront’s ongoing curatorial program that examines building as both a place and a process. The Absolute Restoration of All Things follows five exhibitions in the cycle, Aquí­ vive gente, Ministry for All,  Arabesque, and Something Broke, and The Great Ruins of Saturn.

 

 

Credits

The Absolute Restoration of All Things by Miguel Fernández de Castro & Natalia Mendoza.  Graphic design by Estudio Herrera. Organized by Storefront for Art and Architecture, 2022.

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture Team:

José Esparza Chong Cuy, Executive Director and Chief Curator

Jinny Khanduja, Deputy Director

Eduardo Meneses, Gallery and Operations Manager

 

Support

The Absolute Restoration of All Things is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and Fundación Jumex. The opening is supported by Los Mariscos and Mal Mezcal.

 

Building Cycles has been made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, as well as from DS+R; KPF; Steven Holl Architects; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

   

   

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Form Follows Feeling

Tuesday, March 15th, 2022

6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Suchi Reddy in conversation with Beatrice Galilee

On the occasion of the launch of Form Follows Feeling by Suchi Reddy

 

[RSVP]  

 

Please note that in accordance with New York State regulations, proof of vaccination will be required to enter the gallery space.

 

#sfevents @reddymadedesign  @storefrontnyc

 

Join us for an event to celebrate the launch of Form Follows Feeling by Suchi Reddy, published on the occasion of Reddy’s Plym Distinguished Visiting Professorship at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign School of Architecture. The book presents a selection of projects by Reddy’s firm Reddymade and student work from the studio co-taught with host and professor Kevin Erickson. It includes contributions by Alberto Pérez-Gómez, Beatrice Galilee, Isolde Brielmaier, LionHeart, Susan Magsamen, and Michael Spicher. 

 

For the event, Reddy will engage in conversation with curator and critic Beatrice Galilee, with introductory remarks by Kevin Erickson. A new artistic video collaboration with poet, artist, and writer LionHeart will also debut at the event, as an extension of his series of spatial poems written in response to the work of Suchi Reddy. 

 

Form Follows Feeling is edited by Julia van den Hout of Original Copy, designed by Natasha Jen of Pentagram, published by the University of Illinois School of Architecture, and printed in New York by Cosmos Communications. A limited number of copies will be provided to those who attend the event.

 

This event is free and open to the public. RSVPs are encouraged.

 

Suchi Reddy founded Reddymade Architecture and Design in 2002. Since its inception, the firm has been lauded for its formal experimentation, its imaginative use of color, and passion for innovative materials. Based in New York, the firm’s practice spans the fields of architecture, design, installation art, and sculpture. Through its diverse portfolio of projects, Reddymade utilizes a human-centric approach to design, dedicated to celebrating diversity and equality, as well as addressing the economic, social, environmental and cultural impacts of her work on both the user and the planet.

 

Reddy sits on the boards of the Design Trust for Public Space, Storefront for Art and Architecture, and Madame Architect; and she is a member of the Dean’s Board of Advisors at University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture. She was appointed the Plym Distinguished Professor at the University of Illinois School of Architecture, Urbana-Champaign for the Fall 2019 semester. Reddy has presented and lectured on the firm’s work at numerous venues including The Salk Institute for the Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture’s 2018 conference, University of Illinois, and University of Wisconsin.

 

Beatrice Galilee is a curator, critic and cultural consultant specializing in the field of contemporary architecture and design. She is internationally recognised for her worldwide experience in curating, designing and conceiving original and dynamic city-wide biennales, museum exhibitions, installations, conferences, events and publications, bringing together the world’s most important institutions with cutting edge practitioners. Her research and writing has been published in journals, newspapers and magazines.

 

She is co-founder and creative director of The World Around, a new platform for critical architectural discourse. Between 2014-2019 was the first curator of architecture and design at The Metropolitan Museum of Art where she curated exhibitions and site-specific installations with artists and architects including Wolfgang Tillmans, Cornelia Parker, Luisa Lambri, Bas Princen and Adrian Villar Rojas and initiated the annual conference “A Year of Architecture in a Day”. She has led city-wide exhibitions and biennales in Lisbon, Shenzhen, Gwangju, Milan, Ordos, London, and New York. She received a BSc in Architecture from University of Bath, an MSc in Architectural History from Bartlett UCL and is currently a PhD candidate at the Royal College of Art.

The Great Ruins of Saturn

 
The Great Ruins of Saturn
By Alvaro Urbano
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Exhibition Opening:
Saturday, December 4th from 5-7 pm [RSVP]
Please note that the public opening is free and all are welcome to attend. Proof of vaccination will be required to enter the gallery space.

 

Gallery Hours:
Wednesdays – Saturdays, 12-6 pm
December 8th, 2021 – February 26th, 2022
(Closed December 23rd – January 1st)

 

#greatruinsofsaturn     @alvaro_urbano     @storefrontnyc   

 

“There’s a great, big, beautiful tomorrow and it’s just a dream away!”
Song lyrics for the Carousel of Progress (1964)
by Richard & Robert Sherman, commissioned by Walt Disney

 

“Man’s Achievements on a Shrinking Globe in an Expanding Universe” stated the dedication of the 1964 New York World’s Fair, held at Flushing Meadows Corona Park – once a sprawling ash dump in the heart of the borough of Queens.

 

The 650-acre fair site was populated by hundreds of temporary structures and attended by 51 million people. Amidst all the attractions, the colossal New York State Pavilion, with its space age design and its boasting rights as the largest and tallest pavilion at the fair, embodied the spectacle of “man’s achievements” (or of those by certain men, such as Governor Nelson Rockefeller, World’s Fair President Robert Moses, and pavilion architect Philip Johnson).

 

57 years later, this once colorful symbol that sought to project the ultimate vision of progress, optimism, and power lies largely dormant. Its concrete vestige now casts shadows upon its surroundings…and its original vision. While other structures from the fair have been repurposed, rehabilitated, and moved to various sites, the New York State Pavilion, with its central structure known as the Tent of Tomorrow, still awaits its grand departure.

 

The Great Ruins of Saturn by artist Alvaro Urbano speculates upon its unknown future. Through the technique of shadow puppetry, Urbano presents a film and an installation that playfully and satirically resurface stories from the Tent of Tomorrow and its politically and socially charged past. Urbano’s work situates the neglected pavilion in a theater occupied by a cast of inanimate characters, bringing them to life in order to question both obsolete and contemporary notions of growth and development.

 

Untethered from its original site, the building relinquishes the bright lights of achievement and instead seeks an otherworldly ending. In the process, it escapes the shadows formed by the still-thriving promises of a techno-capitalist future.

 

RSVP for the public opening here.

 

About the Artist

Alvaro Urbano (b. 1983, Madrid, Spain) is a visual artist based in Berlin. He studied at the Escuela Técnica Superior de Madrid (ETSAM) and the Institut für Raumexperimente of the Universität der Künste in Berlin. He is currently a professor at the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Urbano’s practice embraces a variety of media, from performance to spatial installations that unfold throughout an experimental process. Often using architecture, theatre, and heterotopia as points of departure, his work invites dialogue in newly conceived environments – exposing conflicts between reality and fiction that redefine and render time-space based situations. Recently, his work has explored and researched the futures of abandoned and vacant World’s Fair pavilions, as in his 2020 show The Awakening at La Casa Encendida (Madrid), which animated the 1958 Spanish Pavilion in Brussels. The Great Ruins of Saturn is Urbano’s first solo exhibition in the U.S.

 

Building Cycles

The Great Ruins of Saturn is presented as part of Building Cycles, Storefront’s ongoing curatorial program that examines building as both a place and a process. The Great Ruins of Saturn follows four exhibitions in the cycle, Aquí­ vive gente, Ministry for All,  Arabesque, and Something Broke.

 

 

Credits

The Great Ruins of Saturn by Alvaro Urbano. Graphic design by Estudio Herrera. Organized by Storefront for Art and Architecture, 2021.

 

Film Credits:
Artist: Alvaro Urbano
Puppeteers and Scenography: Victor Ame Navarro, Yao Liao, Luli Pérez, and Elena Peters
Music: Coeval
Editing: Joji Koyama
Graphic Design: Estudio Herrera
Commissioned by: Storefront for Art and Architecture with the collaboration of Acción Cultural Española, AC/E

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture Team:

José Esparza Chong Cuy, Executive Director & Chief Curator

Jinny Khanduja, Deputy Director

Eduardo Meneses, Gallery and Operations Manager

 

Support

The Great Ruins of Saturn is presented in collaboration with Acción Cultural Española (AC/E), as well as with the support of Silman, ChertLüdde, Travesía Cuatro, and Sotheby’s. Lighting design is supported by L’Observatoire International, with contributions from Lutron / KETRA, Lumenture, and O’Blaney Rinker Associates.

 

Building Cycles has been made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, as well as from DS+R; KPF; Steven Holl Architects; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

          

 

           

 

                       

 

 

             

 

 

         

 

 

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Closing Event: Something Broke

Friday, November 5th, 2021
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY
Silkscreen Station: 4 – 7 pm ET
Virtual Performance by Mariela Scafati: 4:30 pm ET
 
$25 requested donation per attendee; free for members of Storefront. Tote bags and t-shirts will be provided; guests can also bring their own (light colored, pre-ironed) items to print. Storefront’s membership program allows us to remain open and is crucial to our ability to present new work in the gallery space and beyond.
 
Please note that in accordance with New York State regulations, proof of vaccination will be required to enter the gallery space.
 
#somethingbroke   #algoserompio   @scafatiscafati   @storefrontnyc
 
 
Join us next Friday for an event to mark the closing of Something Broke: 2011–Windows–2021 by Mariela Scafati.
 
Drawing upon the artist’s installation at Storefront as well as her work as one of the founders of Serigrafistas Queer (Queer Silkscreeners), attendees are invited to learn the method of silkscreening in order to print on t-shirts and tote bags with an original design by Scafati (pictured above). T-shirts and tote bags will be provided by Storefront for the event, and guests can also bring their own (light-colored and ironed) cloth items to print on. At 4:30 pm, a live virtual performance, Kamishibai Windows (presented by the artist in person from ArteBA in Buenos Aires) will be screened from inside the gallery space and on Storefront’s instagram at @storefrontnyc.
 
About the Exhibition
“A self portrait in reds and pinks,” offers Scafati. Something Broke is a diary of the personal and the collective, in the form of paintings that are both poems and protest signs. It’s a window into the artist’s body as a painter, a teacher, an activist, a queer silkscreener, and – as of recently – a mother. It’s a spectrum of visceral crimsons.
 
These reds and pinks emerge from the artist’s bonds of affection through activism, and from an entanglement of art, politics, and life. They are windows that frame the subjectivities of a body that seeks to inhabit other ways of being.
 
Read more about the exhibition here.
 
RSVP for the event here. Please note that space is limited and entry at the door will be on a first come, first served basis. For non-members: to confirm your attendance, you can make the requested donation or renew/join our membership program in advance of the event.
 
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Support
 
With special thanks to Diego Bianchi, curator of the performance program at ArteBA 21.
 
The silkscreen printing station at this event supports Works in Progress, a nonprofit organization that provides printing services and education.
 
Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from BKSK; DS+R; KPF; Steven Holl Architects; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.