2019 Friends + Family Membership Dinner

CSR_Mon_Mar_27

 

Monday, October 28th, 2019

Storefront for Art and Architecture

97 Kenmare, New York, NY

 

#membershipdinner     @storefrontnyc

 

Each fall, Storefront brings together 100 established and emerging voices in art, architecture, design, and planning for its annual Friends + Family Membership Dinner. This year, we celebrate the arrival of our Executive Director and Chief Curator, José Esparza Chong Cuy, and the launch of our new curatorial program, Building Cycles. 
 
The dinner will take place within the second exhibition of Building Cycles, Ministry for All, which presents the work of architect Carla Juaçaba and artist Marcelo Cidade.
 
Storefront’s membership family supports our unique mission and allows us to continue to develop innovative public programming at the intersection of art, architecture, and design. To join, renew, or upgrade your membership, contact us at membership@storefrontnews.org.
 
See photos from past dinners here.

 

Reserved Seating

 

Join us by becoming a member of Storefront at the Action Benefactor level or aboveTo become an Action Benefactor member or upgrade your membership in order to join us, please contact us at 212.431.5795 or membership@storefrontnews.org

 

Current members: to reserve a seat, please RSVP. 

 

 

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

 

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STOREFRONT MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS

 

ACTION BENEFACTOR

 

$1,000 individual / $1800 dual (for two individuals at the same address)

 

  • One invitation (2 for dual) to Storefront’s annual 100-person Membership Dinner in our gallery space
  • Invitations to private Storefront exhibition receptions
  • Three invitations to press and member previews of all exhibition openings at Storefront
  • Three invitations to a members-only curator led tour of each of Storefront’s exhibitions
  • Three invitations to members-only programming, including tours, discussions, screenings, drinks, dinners, and more with emerging and established voices in art and architecture
  • Passes and invitations to select architecture and art fairs
  • A complimentary copy of the Storefront Newsprints book
  • Guaranteed seating at Storefront events
  • Mailed copy of each of Storefront’s exhibition and program newsprints
  • Access to Storefront’s archives
  • Acknowledgment and listing on Storefront’s website and publications
  • 50% off of Storefront competition registration fees
  • 20% off of Storefront publications and books for sale in the gallery space

 

VISIONARY

 

$5000 Individual or Corporate

 

  • Ability to host one private event in Storefront’s gallery space per year
  • Private curator-led tours of each of Storefront’s exhibitions for friends, clients, colleagues, and/or staff
  • Two invitations to Storefront’s annual 100-person Membership Dinner in the gallery space
  • Invitations to private Storefront exhibition receptions
  • Unlimited invitations to press and member previews of all exhibition openings at Storefront
  • Unlimited invitations to a members-only curator led tour of each of Storefront’s exhibitions
  • Five invitations to members-only programming, including tours, discussions, screenings, drinks, dinners, and more with emerging and established voices in art and architecture
  • Passes and invitations to select architecture and art fairs
  • A complimentary copy of each newly released Storefront publication, as well as the Storefront Newsprints book
  • Guaranteed seating at Storefront events
  • Mailed copy of each of Storefront’s exhibition and program newsprints
  • Acknowledgment on Storefront’s website, emails, print invitations, newsprints, and gallery wall text for all exhibitions and programs
  • 50% off of Storefront competition registration fees
  • 20% off of Storefront publications and books for sale in the gallery space

Ministry for All

 

Graphic design by Estudio Campo. 

Photos by Marcel Gautherot, collection of Instituto Moreira Salles. 

Ministry for All

Carla Juaçaba and Marcelo Cidade

September 21st–December 14th, 2019

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Opening: Saturday, September 21st, 3 pm–6 pm [RSVP]

 

#ministryforall            @storefrontnyc            @carlajuacaba             @cidade                

 

Buildings are often positioned as beacons of progress and symbols of growth and power. Their foundations, dug solidly into the earth, aim to give shape to new visions for future social ideals and to frame the identities of the territories in which they are located.

 

Ministry for All takes its title from the monumental work of civic buildings by architect Oscar Niemeyer (1907-2012) that once stood as an emblem of social, political, and economic development in what would be Brazil’s new capital, Brasilia. Built between 1956-1960, the city was laid out in an open plan by architect Lucio Costa (1902-1998) to be a modern utopia in which all aspects of life had a distinct space, and all buildings had an explicit agenda.

 

As the new seat of the nation, Brasilia’s central district incorporated grandiose structures: a congressional house, a cathedral, a presidential residence, and the Esplanade of Ministries, which consists of a series of seventeen colossal concrete edifices that flank the Monumental Axis, the city’s central avenue. While the Niemeyer/Costa plan for Brasilia erected formal structures imbued with a sense of stability, the composition and nature of the Ministries changes from one administration to another, and their reconfiguration is often used as a political tool by those holding the country’s highest office. The physical presence of the structures remains constant, yet what occurs inside of them is perpetually in flux, ultimately shaping and influencing the social order.

 

Ministry for All pairs architect Carla Juaçaba (Rio de Janeiro, 1976) and artist Marcelo Cidade (São Paulo, 1979) in an indirect collaboration that exposes the physical infrastructures of Storefront’s gallery space in order to comment on the social and political foundations of the built environment. This site-specific installation, created entirely with Storefront’s existing infrastructural elements, undresses the gallery’s iconic facade to acknowledge the theatricality and vulnerability of architecture.

 

Juaçaba’s simple gesture of removing the facade’s concrete panels reveals the inner workings of the building. Its cladding is no longer on view from the outside; instead, construction materials such as insulation foam and plywood boards are exposed. By rendering these infrastructural components visible, Juaçaba’s intervention reflects upon the foundations that underlie systems of power. Cidade brings the concrete panels to the gallery’s interior, rearranging them to create new spaces, forms, and interactions. This layered installation extrudes the facade inward and allows visitors to walk through it, providing a different reading of its panels now that they are no longer performing their intended function. The artist repurposes the gallery’s protective shell, with its cracks, dirt marks, and graffiti, into a composition that alters the space, shifting the order of what we consider to be inside and outside, or public and private. 

 

Acknowledging the limits of architecture can provide important lessons about how spaces come to be used differently from their stated intentions. Although exposing what buildings are made of might make them seem vulnerable, in recognizing their fragility we are reminded that it is the users who make them perform.

 

Together, Juaçaba and Cidade’s collaboration serves as a conceptual and poetic critique on the resilience of architecture that ultimately asks a crucial question for the future of Brazil and other societies around the world: how do we build social and political systems that work for all?

 

About the Collaborators

Carla Juaçaba is a Rio de Janeiro-based architect with an office focusing on design practice and research for both public and private projects, including housing and cultural programs. Her design projects include the Atelier House, Rio Bonito House, Veranda House, and Santa Teresa House, along with exhibition design work for numerous exhibition. A notable recent project is Juaçaba’s ephemeral Pavilion Humanidade 2012 for Rio+20, which was created in collaboration with theater director Bia Lessa. Juaçaba has lectured at Harvard University, Columbia University, and Academia di Architettura Mendrisio, among others. In 2013, Juaçaba won the first edition of the ArcVision Women and Architecture international prize, and in 2018, she was awarded the AREA Architectural Review Emerging Architecture Award. Juaçaba participated in the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennial, where she presented the project BALLAST, and was also commissioned to design a chapel for the Holy See Pavilion.

 

Marcelo Cidade was born in 1979 in São Paulo, where he currently lives and works. Cidade creates work that confronts social issues in the urban context, bringing signs and situations from the street into art spaces. He has a particular interest in the public space of cities and the technological and social implications of surveillance states. Cidade’s work has been presented in numerous solo and group exhibitions, including at: Galeria Vermelho, São Paulo; Museu Brasileiro da Escultura e Ecologia, São Paulo, Galleria Continua, Italy; Kadist Art Foundation, San Francisco; Casa França-Brasil, Rio de Janeiro; Furini Arte Contemporanea, Rome; and Centro Cultural São Paulo. Cidade’s works also feature in many public collections, such as Fundação Serralves; Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo; Museu de Arte de São Paulo; Tate Modern; Kadist Art Foundation; Museo Tamayo Arte Contemporaneo; and the Bronx Museum.

 

Building Cycles

Ministry for All is the second exhibition in Building Cycles, Storefront’s year-long curatorial program that examines building as both a place and a process. Emphasizing infrastructure as a crucial step of construction, this exhibition conceptually questions architecture’s foundations and links them to broader social infrastructures. Ministry for All follows the first exhibition in the cycle, Aqui vive gente, which engaged in observation and site analysis informed by community needs and desires.

 

 

Credits

Ministry for All by Carla Juaçaba and Marcelo Cidade. Graphic design by Estudio Campo. Presented by Storefront for Art and Architecture, 2019. 

 

Presented by Storefront for Art and Architecture

José Esparza Chong Cuy, Executive Director and Chief Curator

Jinny Khanduja, Deputy Director

Jessica Kwok, Gallery and Operations Manager

Patrick Jaojoco, Development and Communications Associate

Iara Pimenta, Curatorial Fellow

Chialin Chou, Archive Curator

Interns: Ramses Gonzalez, Hana Halilaj, Adela Locsin, Caroline Koh Smith, Ipek Kosova, Brian Sing, Eduardo Meneses, Karen Wang

 

Support

Pro-bono support for this exhibition is provided by Front Inc. and Thornton Tomasetti.

 

 

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Ministry for All is the second exhibition in Storefront for Art and Architecture’s year-long program of exhibitions and events, Building Cycles. Founding support of Building Cycles is generously provided by Linde-Griffith Construction Company and the Graham Foundation.

 

                          

 

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; KPF; ODA; Rockwell Group; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

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Convocatoria abierta de ideas – Museo de Historia y Comunidad de Puerta de Tierra

 

To read about the call in English, click here.

 

¿Cómo podemos imaginar un museo que sirve a su comunidad? ¿Cómo podemos crear nuevas lecturas sobre el papel de la institución cultural y su función pública?

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture y Taller Creando Sin Encargos anuncian una convocatoria abierta de ideas para reimaginar el histórico Edificio Infanzón, ubicado en San Juan, Puerto Rico. El edificio, que lleva abandonado más de dos décadas, está planeado para ser la sede permanente del Museo de Historia y Comunidad de Puerta de Tierra (MHC PDT). 

 

Este llamado para recibir propuestas es una extensión de la exposición Aquí vive gente de Brigada Puerta de Tierra, presentada en la galería de Storefront del 1 de junio al 7 de septiembre de 2019. La exposición es la primera presentación pública del naciente MHC PDT, cuya misión es “afirmar, cuidar y continuar con orgullo y dignidad la trayectoria histórica cultural de barrio a través de la participación comunitaria, y preservar el patrimonio y la memoria colectiva de Puerta de Tierra.”

 

La convocatoria tiene el objetivo de apoyar a Brigada Puerta de Tierra, un colectivo comunitario y grupo activista que trabaja con artistas, jóvenes y residentes del barrio de Puerta de Tierra en su misión de convertir el Edificio Infanzón en el MHC PDT. Desde 2016, el colectivo ha estado trabajando con la comunidad de Puerta de Tierra para limpiar, restaurar y preservar el edificio para este uso.

 

¿Cómo funciona?

El MHC PDT es una iniciativa autogestionada que utiliza estrategias horizontales para hacer comunidad e imaginar un centro comunitario vibrante para la gente de Puerta de Tierra. La convocatoria refleja los valores de la comunidad y los principios de organización de Brigada Puerta de Tierra, el grupo que inició el proyecto.

 

Este es un llamado para todos: arquitectos y diseñadores, artistas y activistas, niños y adultos y cualquiera que quiera compartir su creatividad con propuestas para adaptar, revitalizar y reimaginar un espacio de preservación cultural junto con los residentes de Puerta de Tierra. La convocatoria busca ideas para transformar el Edificio Infanzón en el Museo de Historia y Comunidad de Puerta de Tierra, imaginando el edificio más allá de su estado actual y presentando ideas para albergar la colección del museo, así como espacios para reuniones y talleres comunitarios.

 

Las propuestas pueden ser dibujos detallados, collages conceptuales, manifiestos visuales o provocaciones gráficas que cuestionen el papel del museo. Las presentaciones exitosas despertarán la imaginación colectiva sobre el futuro del museo y generarán respuestas que están en diálogo con las necesidades de la comunidad de Puerta de Tierra. Se priorizará la visión y la creatividad sobre las habilidades profesionales, y las propuestas seleccionadas reflejarán una mezcla de proyectos recibidos, tanto de miembros de la comunidad de Puerta de Tierra como de otras personas interesadas en la convocatoria.

 

Las propuestas recibidas serán expuestas en San Juan, y la comunidad de Puerta de Tierra seleccionará los tres proyectos que mejor se alineen con su visión para el el uso del Edificio Infanzón. Los autores de las propuestas seleccionadas serán invitados a refinar sus proyectos con la ayuda de asesores invitados, locales e internacionales, quienes ofrecerán comentarios y sugerencias. 

 

Los tres proyectos finalistas serán presentados por los mismos autores en la Asamblea Building Cycles, un encuentro de gran escala que se llevará a cabo durante el verano de 2020 y que marca la culminación del año de programación de Storefront. 

 

Final proposals will be presented by their creators at the Building Cycles Assembly, a large-scale gathering in the summer of 2020 that marks the culmination of Storefront’s year-long series of exhibitions and public events. Adicionalmente, estas propuestas se publicarán en las plataformas digitales de Storefront y en medios asociados locales e internacionales.

 

Sobre los asesores

Storefront for Art and Architecture y Taller Creando Sin Encargos han invitado a un grupo de asesores multidisciplinarios cuyo trabajo engloba temas comunitarios, planeación urbana, historia y trabajo institucional con un enfoque en el contexto de Puerta de Tierra y de San Juan, Puerto Rico. Más información sobre los asesores se anunciará próximamente. 

 

Calendario  

Septiembre 6, 2019: Anuncio de la convocatoria abierta

Diciembre 20, 2019: Fecha límite para entregar propuestas

Febrero 2020: Exposición pública de todas las propuestas recibidas en San Juan, Puerto Rico

Marzo 2020: Anuncio de tres proyectos seleccionados por la comunidad

Marzo – Julio 2020:  Talleres con asesores para los tres proyectos seleccionados 

Agosto 2020: Presentación de proyectos seleccionados en la Asamblea Building Cycles en Nueva York. 

 

Materiales solicitados

Los participantes deberán enviar los siguientes materiales: 

 

  • Póster: Un documento tamaño póster en formato A1 (594 x 841 mm o 23.4 x 33.1 in) que comunique los conceptos principales del proyecto. Es importante considerar que los pósters se presentarán públicamente en versión impresa en San Juan, Puerto Rico para el proceso de selección comunitaria. 
  • Imágenes: 3-7 imágenes adicionales que representen el proyecto. Las imágenes pueden ser dibujos, renders, collages, pinturas, fotografías, etc. 
  • Concepto: Un breve texto en inglés o español indicando las ideas principales del proyecto y describiendo las estrategias propuestas para transformar el edificio actual en un museo. Puede incluir ideas para espacios de exposición y áreas para talleres y programas comunitarios. (Máximo 500 palabras).

 

Materiales de apoyo

Leer más sobre el Edificio Infanzón aquí.

 

El Edificio Infanzón está ubicado en la esquina de Calle San Agustín con Tadeo Rivera. Ver aquí el Google Street View del edificio. Para imágenes de la limpieza y el estado actual del Edificio Infanzón, presione aquí.

 

Información para enviar propuestas

Correo electrónico (Preferido): Las propuestas deberán ser enviadas en tres archivos PDF separados a competitions@storefrontnews.org indicando “Convocatoria abierta de ideas – MHC PDT – [Título del proyecto]” en la línea de asunto. Cada archivo deberá ser de 5 MB máximo. Favor de titular archivos de la siguiente manera: 

1. Póster: [Título del proyecto_Póster]

2. Imágenes (en un archivo PDF): [Título del proyecto_Imágenes]

3. Concepto: [Título del proyecto_Concepto]

 

Correo postal: Favor de enviar todo el material solicitado en un solo paquete a la dirección indicada abajo. Favor de incluir en el paquete la dirección de remitente y un documento indicando su nombre y contacto (teléfono y/o email). 

 

Brigada Puerta de Tierra

Falansterio, Apt. N-9

Puerta de Tierra

San Juan, PR 00901

 

Para recibir noticias y actualizaciones sobre la convocatoria abierta, regístrese aquí.

 

¿Preguntas? Mandar email a competitions@storefrontnews.org.

About the Infanzón Building / Sobre El Edificio Infanzón

 

ENGLISH

 

EDIFICIO INFANZÓN (INFANZÓN BUILDING)

 

To mention “Infanzón” in the neighborhood of Puerta de Tierra has been a daily custom, both in regards to the Infanzón department store and to the family that gave it its name. 

 

The Infanzóns were merchants from Asturias who arrived in Puerta de Tierra, and for generations was characterized as laborious, simple, and kind. Everyone in the neighborhood loved and respected them. In the 1920s, Don Ramiro and his sons founded a store on San Agustín Street at the corner of Tadeo Rivera Street. Later, Don Ramiro’s son Ramiro along with his nephews José María, Manolo, and Guillermo continued operating the store, which sold everything—long before there were department stores in Puerto Rico. 

 

Since its inception, the neighborhood of Puerta de Tierra has been a pioneer in many areas, and the Infanzón department store was no exception. You can still see the “Infanzón & Sons” sign, made in cement in 1926, hanging in the building. The upper floor was a tailor shop that was later converted into an inventory space where the brothers stored their goods. The lower floor was the store itself. The store sold mainly fabrics, and also had sections for various products for the home, perfumes, footwear, purses, clothing for children, men, and women, and other items. For those who did not have money at the time—which was almost the entire neighborhood—there was an honor system in place. There were no credit cards; rather, the word of honor of the humble people of the neighborhood was enough for the honored merchants.

 

With time, Don Ramiro returned to Spain, and his relatives moved to other towns in Puerto Rico. It was then that the department store ceased its functions in Puerta de Tierra. It remained closed for many years, and there was a period when it was used as a residential building. Later, however, disuse plagued the building, and it became filled with garbage and nefarious activity. This remained the case until 2015, when a group of young people and children came together to do something for the neighborhood, which had almost completely fallen into the same state of deterioration as the Infanzón department store. 

 

The group chose the name Brigada Puerta de Tierra, and took on the task of rescuing the Edificio Infanzón, cleaning its lot and building grounds, painting it, decorating it with beautiful murals, and sealing it so that trash and unwanted activity would not reappear. The kids also had an idea: why not use the Edificio Infanzón to establish a community center where they could meet, attend workshops, establish a library, and create an area to share the history of the neighborhood? They set to work. The necessary steps, which were many and very lengthy, were put into place. Now, finally, Brigada Puerta de Tierra and all the residents of the neighborhood are about to be able to call the Edificio Infanzón the home of the Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra. 

 

The exhibition that you see here is a taste of this effort, and an example of what our museum will soon contain.

 

ESPAÑOL

 

EDIFICIO INFANZÓN

 

Mencionar “Infanzón” en el barrio de Puerta de Tierra ha sido costumbre diaria, tanto por los Almacenes Infanzón, como por la familia que le dio su nombre. 

 

Los Infanzón eran comerciantes asturianos que llegaron a Puerta de Tierra, y por generaciones dicha familia se caracterizó por ser muy laboriosa, sencilla y buena. Todos en el barrio los querían y los respetaban. En la segunda década del siglo XX, Don Ramiro y sus hijos fundaron una tienda en la Calle San Agustín esquina Tadeo Rivera. Posteriormente, su hijo Ramiro, y sus sobrinos José María, Manolo y Guillermo, continuaron con la tienda. En ella se vendía de todo, mucho antes de que existieran en Puerto Rico las tiendas por departamentos. 

 

El barrio de Puerta de Tierra desde sus comienzos fue pionero en muchas cosas, y los Almacenes Infanzón es una de ellas. Todavía se puede ver el letrero en el edificio, Infanzón & Sons, hecho en cemento en 1926. El piso superior era una sastrería, y luego fue el almacén donde los hermanos guardaban la mercancía. El piso inferior era la tienda misma. En la tienda principalmente se vendían telas, y en cada sección de la tienda también se vendían diversos productos para el hogar, perfumes, calzado y carteras, y ropa de niños, damas y caballeros, entre otros. Y al que no tenía el dinero al momento, que era casi todo el barrio, se le fiaba la mercancía. No existían las tarjetas de crédito, pero sí la palabra de honor de la gente humilde del barrio, tomada como válida por los honrados comerciantes. 

 

Con el tiempo, Don Ramiro regresó a España y otros familiares se mudaron a vivir a otros pueblos de Puerto Rico. Fue entonces cuando el almacén cesó funciones en Puerta de Tierra. Se mantuvo cerrado por muchos años y hubo una etapa en que fue utilizado como edificio de viviendas. Pero posteriormente, el desuso lo llenó de basura y malas presencias. En 2015, un grupo de jóvenes y niños se unieron para hacer algo por el barrio, que había caído casi por completo en el mismo deterioro de los Almacenes Infanzón.

 

El grupo escogió el nombre de Brigada Puerta de Tierra, y se dio a la tarea de rescatar el Edificio Infanzón, limpiar sus predios, pintarlo, decorarlo con hermosos murales, y sellarlo para que no regresaran ni la basura ni las malas presencias. Y a esos mismos muchachitos se les ocurrió una idea: ¿Por qué no usar el Edificio Infanzón para hacerlo como un centro comunitario en el cual pudieran reunirse, asistir a talleres, establecer una biblioteca y crear un área para exhibir la historia del barrio? En seguida pusieron manos a la obra. Se hicieron las gestiones necesarias, muchas y muy largas, y al fin la Brigada Puerta de Tierra y todos los residentes del barrio están a punto de poder llamar al edificio Infanzón con el nombre de Museo de Historia y Comunidad de Puerta de Tierra. 

 

La presente exposición que estás viendo es una muestra de lo que pronto contendrá nuestro museo.

Call for Ideas – Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra

 

Para leer sobre el llamado en español, presione aquí.

 

What does a museum that serves its community look like? How can we create new understandings of the role of a cultural institution and its public purpose?

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture and Taller Creando Sin Encargos announce an open call for ideas to reimagine the historic Infanzón Building, located in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The building, which has been abandoned for over two decades, is poised to serve as the permanent home of the Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra (MHC PDT).

 

This open call for proposals is an extension of the exhibition Aquí vive gente (People Live Here) by Brigada Puerta de Tierra, presented at Storefront’s gallery space from June 1st-September 7th, 2019. The exhibition is the first public presentation of the nascent MHC PDT, which has a mission “to affirm, care for, and carry with pride and dignity the cultural legacy of the neighborhood through community participation, and to preserve the cultural heritage and collective memory of Puerta de Tierra.”

 

The open call aims to support Brigada Puerta de Tierra, a community collective and activist group that works with artists, youth, and residents of the neighborhood of Puerta de Tierra, in their mission to convert the Infanzón Building into the MHC PDT.  Since 2016, the collective has been working with the community of Puerta de Tierra to clean, restore, and preserve the building for this use.

 

Open Call Format

The MHC PDT is a self-organized neighborhood initiative that has used horizontal principles of community building to imagine a vibrant community center for the people of Puerta de Tierra. This open call reflects the values of the community and the organizing principles of Brigada Puerta de Tierra, the group that initiated the project.

 

The call is open to everyone: architects and designers, artists and activists, children and adults, and anyone who wants to share their creativity through proposals to adapt, revitalize, and reimagine a space of cultural preservation alongside the residents of Puerta de Tierra. The call asks for proposals to transform the Infanzón Building into the Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra, envisioning the building beyond its current state and presenting ideas to host the museum’s collection and spaces for community meetings and workshops. 

 

Submissions can be detailed drawings, conceptual collages, visual manifestos, or graphic provocations that question the role of the museum. Successful submissions will spark collective imagination about the future of the museum and generate responses that are in dialogue with the needs of the Puerta de Tierra community. Vision and creativity will be prioritized over professional skills, and the final selected entries will reflect a mix of submissions from community members and others who are interested in the prompt.

 

Open call entries will be exhibited locally in San Juan, and the community of Puerta de Tierra will make a selection of three projects that best align with their visions for the potential use of the Infanzón Building. The creators of the selected entries will be invited to participate in one-on-one workshop sessions with local and international reviewers, who will provide commentary and feedback to further refine proposals.

 

Final proposals will be presented by their creators at the Building Cycles Assembly, a large-scale gathering in the summer of 2020 that marks the culmination of Storefront’s year-long series of exhibitions and public events. Entries will additionally be published on Storefront’s digital platforms and released in partnership with local and international media.

 

About the Reviewers

Storefront for Art and Architecture and Taller Creando Sin Encargos have invited a multi-disciplinary group of reviewers whose work addresses community engagement, urban planning, history, and institution-building with a focus on the context of Puerta de Tierra and San Juan, Puerto Rico. More information about the reviewers will be made public throughout the call.

 

Application Calendar 

September 6th, 2019: Announcement of the open call

December 20th, 2019: Deadline for entries

February 2020: Exhibition of all entries in San Juan, Puerto Rico

March 2020: Public vote and announcement of the three selected projects

March – July 2020: Workshops with reviewers for selected projects

August 2020: Presentation of selected projects at the Building Cycles Assembly in NYC

 

Application Materials

Applicants are requested to submit:

 

  • Poster: A poster-size document in A1 format (594 x 841 mm or 23.4 x 33.1 in) that communicates the main concepts behind the entry. Please note that printed versions of these posters will be displayed in San Juan, Puerto Rico for community selection.
  • Images: 3-7 additional images that represent the project. Images can be produced in different media such as drawing, rendering, collage, painting, photography, etc.
  • Statement: A brief statement in English or Spanish about the key concepts behind the proposal that describes strategies to transform the current building into a museum, including ideas for exhibitions spaces and areas for workshops and community programs. (Maximum word count = 500).

 

Background Materials

Read more about the Edificio Infanzón here.

 

The Infanzón Building is located at the corner of San Agustín and Tadeo Rivera streets. See here for a Google Street View of the building. For images of the cleanup and the current state of the Infanzón Building, please see here

 

Submission Information

Email (Preferred): Applications should be sent as three separate PDF files to competitions@storefrontnews.org with the subject line “Call for Ideas – MHC PDT – [Title of Project].” Each file should be a maximum of 5 MB. Please title files as follows:

1. Poster: [Project Title_Poster]

2. Images (in a combined PDF file): [Project Title_Images]

3. Statement: [Project Title_Statement]

 

Mail: Please mail all documents in a single package to the address below. Please include a return address as well as a cover sheet with your name and contact info (phone number and/or email) in the package.

 

Brigada Puerta de Tierra

Falansterio, Apt. N-9

Puerta de Tierra

San Juan, PR 00901

 

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Questions? Email competitions@storefrontnews.org.

Todos juntos (Everyone Together)

 

 

Todos juntos (Everyone Together)

Closing Event Program for Aquí vive gente

Saturday, September 7th, 2019

 

[RSVP]

 

#aquívivegente           @brigadapdt          @storefrontnyc

 

12–1 pm

Exhibition Tour by artist and Brigada member Margarita Ramos

Storefront for Art and Architecture: 97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

4–5:30 pm 

Youth Basketball Game: Puerta de Tierra vs. Lower East Side

Boys Club of New York: 287 East 10th Street, New York, NY

 

6–8 pm

Live medley of Joe Quijano’s music by members of Conjunto Cachana

The Loisaida Center: 710 East 9th Street, New York, NY

 

To mark the closing of Aquí vive gente: Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra, Storefront for Art and Architecture presents Todos juntos (Everyone Together).This day-long program begins with an exhibition tour by Margarita Ramos, a member of Brigada Puerta de Tierra and the artist of the mobile murals on the walls of the gallery space.

 

Afterwards, the murals will travel from the gallery space to the Boys Club of New York, where a team of young players from Puerta de Tierra, San Juan will play a friendly game against a local team from the Lower East Side brought together by The Loisaida Center. The game celebrates basketball as a manifestation of neighborhood pride, bringing to light the significance of the sport as a form of collective gathering, a platform for cultural interplay, and a catalyst for social change. The event honors the career of Puerto Rican basketball legend Jenaro “Tuto” Marchand, who passed away in 2017. Marchand left a deep imprint in his home neighborhood of Puerta de Tierra and served as an inspiration to the community and its emerging athletes.

 

After the game, all attendees and players are invited to The Loisaida Center for live music by members of Conjunto Cachana, whose former band leader, Joe Quijano, was born and raised in Puerta de Tierra. The band, put together by Quijano—who passed away earlier this year—features prominently in the section of Aquí vive gente that details the history of music in Puerta de Tierra. Quijano is remembered as a pioneer of salsa music and an advocate for his community. 

 

Visual arts, sports, and music are central to Puerta de Tierra’s identity and are core themes in the collection of the newly formed Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra. The museum aims to preserve and heighten the practice of artists, athletes, and musicians from the neighborhood through creative programs that bring everyone together. 

 

Todos juntos is co-hosted by Storefront for Art and Architecture,Brigada Puerta de Tierra, The Loisaida Center, and the Boys Club of New York.

 

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SUPPORT

 

Brigada Puerta de Tierra is the recipient of the 2017 Visible Award (Cittadellarte – Fondazione Pistoletto, Fondazione Zegna), funding from which has supported this exhibition.

 

 

Aquí vive gente is the first exhibition of Storefront for Art and Architecture’s year-long program of exhibitions and events, Building Cycles. Founding support of Building Cycles is generously provided by Linde-Griffith Construction Company and the Graham Foundation.

 

 

 

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; KPF; ODA; Rockwell Group; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

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Open Meeting: Sharing Community Building Models

Open Meeting: Sharing Community Building Models

August 9th, 2019

 

4–6 pm: Open meeting (RSVP: info@storefrontnews.org with a brief description of your work)

6–8 pm: Drinks, dancing, and music by Sonido Caluda

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

As part of Aquí vive gente, Storefront for Art and Architecture and the East Harlem Culture Collective will host an open meeting on Sharing Community Building Models that brings together local artists, collectives, and organizations focused on community engagement and cultural production in New York City. In a conversation moderated by Alonso Gorozpe, former coordinator of the East Harlem Culture Collective, participants will share their experiences on the opportunities and challenges for self-organized cultural initiatives. For more information or to attend, please email info@storefrontnews.org with a brief description of your work.

 

After the meeting, Aquí vive gente will remain open to the public late for a set by Sonido Caluda, an NYC-based pioneer of the movimiento sonidero who has been hosting parties in New York City and around the Americas for more than two decades. Movimiento sonidero is a genre of public parties and social events from Mexico City in which DJs and entertainers called “sonideros” bring together communities through dance, music, and oration. Read more about the sonidero movement here.

 

Storefront’s current exhibition, Aquí vive gente, presents the first iteration of the Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra (MHC PDT). MHC PDT is a new cultural institution that seeks to preserve the memory and heritage of the neighborhood of Puerta de Tierra in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Initiated by a collective called Brigada Puerta de Tierra and led by community members from the neighborhood, the museum utilizes a horizontal model of governance in which its activities are determined collectively and based on community interest.

 

Read more about the exhibition here

 

SUPPORT

 

Brigada Puerta de Tierra is the recipient of the 2017 Visible Award (Cittadellarte – Fondazione Pistoletto, Fondazione Zegna), funding from which has supported Aquí vive gente.

 

 

Aquí vive gente is the first exhibition of Storefront for Art and Architecture’s year-long program of exhibitions and events, Building Cycles. Founding support of Building Cycles is generously provided by Linde-Griffith Construction Company and the Graham Foundation.

 

 

 

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; KPF; ODA; Rockwell Group; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

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Nominated Publications: Architecture Books – Yet to Be Written

 

The New York Architecture Book Fair is an initiative by Storefront that brings together authors, designers, publishers, critics, and readers to consider what constitutes the most fundamental body of publications in architecture and design. Questioning the idea of the canon, this project seeks to broaden the existing references for architecture culture, which have served to homogenize architectural discourse. 

 

With the purpose of opening up the conversation to new ideas, Storefront launched a Global Survey of Architecture Books that reached more than 1600 scholars, critics, museum directors, historians, and others from 98 countries, asking them to contribute nominations of books from the past 35 years that are fundamental to the development of ideas and culture in architecture.

 

Of the nominated books, a selection of 135 publications were presented in the exhibition as the structural support for a series of bookshelves that will be populated by additional publications throughout the duration of the exhibition, with brief statements that contextualize their relevance. 

 

The below titles form the final list of selected books:

 

Phylogenesis by Foreign Office Architects

Oxymoron and Pleonasm by Kenneth Frampton, Monika Mitášová

The Metapolis Dictionary of Advanced Architecture: City, Technology and Society in the Information Age by Willy Müller

Blue Monday: Stories of Absurd Realities and Natural Philosophies by Kazys; Sumrell Robert Varnelis

The World of Madelon Vriesendorp by Beatriz Colomina, Douglas Coupland, Charles Jencks

Translations from Drawing to Building and Other Essays by Robin Evans

Real Estates: Life Without Debt by Jack Self

Le Corbusier: Complete Works (Eight Volumes) by Willy Boesiger

Wege der Moderne und die Folgen / Ways to Modernism And Their Impact (German and English Edition) by Josef Hoffmann, Adolf Loos

Digital Culture in Architecture by Antoine Picon

A rua da estrada by Álvaro Domingues

Eduardo Souto de Moura: Atlas de Parede, Imagens de Método by Eduardo Souto de Moura, Philip Ursprung, Diogo Seixas Lopes, Pedro Bandeira

Architectural Guide: Riga by Jānis Krastinš, Ivars Strautmanis

El Habitar by Juhani Pallasmaa

La Buena Vida (Spanish Edition) by Iñaki Ábalos

Atlas pintoresco Vol. 2: los viajes by Iñaki Ábalos

Arquitectura y politica / Architecture and Politics: Ensayos para mundos alternativos / Essays for Alternative Worlds (Spanish Edition) by Josep Maria Montaner, Zaida Muxi

El Croquis 94: Neutlings Riedijk 1992-1999 by Richard Levene and Fernando Marquez Cecilia (ed.)

Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste by Pierre Bourdieu

Four Walls and a Roof: The Complex Nature of a Simple Profession by Reinier de Graaf

We Have Never Been Modern by Bruno Latour

Office: Kersten Geers David Van Severen: Seven Rooms by Enrique Walker

Museum of the Future by Cristina Bechtler, Dora Imhof

“Основания культуросоциологии

The Foundations of the Culture of Sociology: Selected Works by Владимир Леонидович Абушенко

Vladimir Leonidovich Abushenko”

Made in Tokyo: Guide Book by Momoyo Kaijima, Junzo Kuroda, Yoshiharu Tsukamoto 

The Kampung Boy by Lat

Are We Human? by Beatriz Colomina and Mark Wigley

Roberto Burle Marx Lectures: Landscape as Art and Urbanism by Gareth Doherty (Editor)

Leonardo Finotti: A Collection of Latin American Modern Architecture by Leonardo Finotti

Geneaology of Modern Architecture: A Comparitive Critical Analysis of Built Form by Kenneth Frampton

From Camp to City: Refugee Camps of the Western Sahara by Edited by Manuel Herz in collaboration with ETH Studio Basel

The Air from Other Planets: A Brief History of Architecture to Come by Sean Lally

Solid Objectives: Order, Edge, Aura by SO-IL

Elements of Architecture by Rem Koolhaas

Fundamentals: 14th International Architecture Exhibition– La Biennale di Venezia by Rem Koolhaas

Exhibiting the Postmodern by Léa-Catherine Szacka

Atlas Of The Conflict: Israel-Palestine by Malkit Shoshan

Deventer by Matthew Stadler

Constant’s New Babylon: The Hyper-Architecture of Desire by Mark Wigley

Coral Stone Mosques of Maldives: The Vanishing Legacy of the Indian Ocean by Mauroof Jameel, Yahaya Ahmad

The Good Life by Iñaki Ábalos

Before Publication: Montage in Art, Architecture, and Book Design by Nanni Baltzer, Martino Stierli (ed.)

Paris Haussmann by Benoît Jallon, Umberto Napolitano, and Franck Boutté (ed.)

Melancholy and Architecture: On Aldo Rossi by Diogo Seixas Lopes

Composition, non-composition (French Edition) by Jacques Lucan

Points and Lines: Diagrams and Projects for the City by Stan Allen

Project of Autonomy: Politics and Architecture Within and Against Capitalism by Pier Vittorio Aureli

Citizens of No Place: An Architectural Graphic Novel by Jimenez Lai

Atlas of Novel Tectonics by Jesse Reiser and Nanako Umemoto 

Kissing Architecture by Sylvia Lavin

Victimas by John Hejduk

The Architectures of Atelier Bow-Wow: Behaviorology by Atelier Bow-Wow

Ten Canonical Buildings 1950-2000 by Peter Eisenman

Tadao Ando: Buildings, Projects, Writings by Kenneth Frampton

John Hejduk: Mask of Medusa: Works 1947-1983 by JOHN). Hejduk, John. Kim Shkapich, Editor (HEJDUK

Greg Lynn Form by Greg Lynn and Mark Rappolt (ed.)

Architecture Culture: 1943-1968 (Columbia Books of Architecture) by Joan Ockman

Architecture and Identity by Chris Abel

Heterotopia and the City: Public Space in a Postcivil Society by Lieven De Cauter, Michiel Dehaene (Editor)

Building Capitalism: Historical Change and the Labour Process in the Production of Built Environment by Linda Clarke

Le Corbusier: Beton Brut and Ineffable Space (1940 – 1965): Surface Materials and Psychophysiology of Vision by Roberto Gargiani, Anna Rosellini

Architectural Principles in the Age of Cybernetics by Christopher Hight

Architecture, Crisis and Resuscitation: The Reproduction of Post-Fordism in Late-Twentieth-Century Architecture by Tahl Kaminer

Rethinking Architecture: A Reader in Cultural Theory by Neil Leach

Junya Ishigami: Another Scale Of Architecture by Junya Ishigami

Utopie: Texts and Projects, 1967–1978 (Semiotext(e) / Foreign Agents) by Craig Buckley, Jean-Louis Violeau (Editors)

Manifeste du tiers paysage by Gilles Clément

Weak and Diffuse Modernity: The World of Projects at the beginning of the 21st Century by Andrea Branzi

Forensis: The Architecture of Public Truth by Forensic Architecture (Editor)

Less is Enough: On Architecture and Asceticism by Pier Vittorio Aureli

Content by Rem Koolhaas

Words and Buildings: A Vocabulary of Modern Architecture by Adrian Forty

Modern Architecture: A Critical History by Kenneth Frampton

The Possibility of an Absolute Architecture (Writing Architecture) by Pier Vittorio Aureli

INDEX Architecture: A Columbia Architecture Book by Matthew Berman, Bernard Tschumi (Editors)

Dreaming The Rational City: The Myth of American City Planning by Christine Boyer

Architecture in the Age of Printing: Orality, Writing, Typography, and Printed Images in the History of Architectural Theory by Mario Carpo

The Alphabet and the Algorithm (Writing Architecture) by Mario Carpo

Privacy and Publicity: Modern Architecture as Mass Media by Beatriz Colomina

5 Petites Pieces Classiques – Various – Gerard Billaudot Editeur – Piano – 510-01881 by Various

Noah’s Ark: Essays on Architecture by Hubert Damisch

Differences: Topographies of Contemporary Architecture by Ignasi de Sola-Morales

Organization Space: Landscapes, Highways, and Houses in America by Keller Easterling

Enduring Innocence: Global Architecture and Its Political Masquerades by Keller Easterling

The Projective Cast: Architecture and Its Three Geometries by Robin Evans

Studies in Tectonic Culture: The Poetics of Construction in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Architecture by Kenneth Frampton

The Architecture of Science by Peter Galison, Emily Thompson

Concrete and Clay: Reworking Nature in New York City by Matthew Gandy

Architecture Theory Since 1968 by K. Michael Hays

Architecture and Modernity: A Critique by Hilde Heynen

A Prehistory of the Cloud by Tung-Hui Hu

Japan-ness in Architecture by Arata Isozaki,David B. Stewart

Good City Form by Kevin Lynch

Nissan Pick-ups: Frontier pick-ups (1998 thru 2004), Xterra (2000 thru 2004), Pathfinder (1996 thru 2004) (Haynes Repair Manual) by Ken Freund

The Organizational Complex: Architecture, Media, and Corporate Space by Reihnold Martin

Theoretical Anxiety and Design Strategies in the Work of Eight Contemporary Architects by Rafael Moneo

Nightlands: Nordic Building by Christian Norberg-Schulz

Architecture School: Three Centuries of Educating Architects in North America by Joan Ockman and Rebecca Williamson

The Portfolio and the Diagram by Hyungmin Pai

Architecture and the Crisis of Modern Science by Alberto Perez-Gomez

The Architecture of the City by Aldo Rossi 

As I Was Saying by Colin Rowe, Alexander Caragonne

Toward A Minor Architecture by Jill Stoner

The Sphere and the Labyrinth: Avant-Gardes and Architecture from Piranesi to the 1970s by Manfredo Tafuri

Venice and the Renaissance by Manfredo Tafuri

Architecture Depends by Jeremy Till

The Historiography of Modern Architecture by Panayotis Tournikiotis

Architecture and Disjunction by Bernard Tschumi

Architecture in the Age of Divided Representation: The Question of Creativity in the Shadow of Production by Dalibor Vesely

The Architectural Uncanny: Essays in the Modern Unhomely by Anthony Vidler

Histories of the Immediate Present; Inventing Architectural Modernism by Anthony Vidler 

The Architecture of Deconstruction: Derrida’s Haunt by Mark Wigley

S, M, L, XL: Small, Medium, Large, Extra Large by Rem Koolhaas, Bruce Mau

Rafael Moneo: Remarks on 21 Works by Rafael Moneo

Atelier Bow: Wow – Graphic Anatomy by Atelier Bow: Wow

Little White Houses: How the Postwar Home Constructed Race in America by Dianne Harris

Architecture Since 1400 by Kathleen James-Chakraborty

Seizing Jerusalem: The Architectures of Unilateral Unification by Alona Nitzan-Shiftan

Henri Lefebvre on Space: Architecture, Urban Research, and the Production of Theory by Lukasz Stanek

Atlas of Emotion: Journeys in Art, Architecture, and Film by Giuliana Bruno

City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles by Mike Davis

Extrastatecraft: The Power of Infrastructure Space by Keller Easterling

Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution by David Harvey

A Guide to the New Ruins of Great Britain by Owen Hatherley

Hollow Land: Israel’s Architecture of Occupation by Eyal Weizman

Cities of Change: Addis Ababa by Marc Angélil, Dirk Hebel (Editors)

Vladimír Dedeček: Interpretations of His Architecture by Monika Mitásová (Editor)

Oswald Mathias Ungers: Morphologie: City Metaphors by Oswald Mathias Ungers 

Questions of Perception: Phenomenology of Architecture by Steven Holl, Juhani Pallasmaa, Alberto Perez-Gomez

Eero Saarinen: Shaping the Future by Eeva-Liisa Pelkonen, Donald Albrecht (Editors)

Taking Measures Across the American Landscape by James Corner

Alvar Aalto: Architecture, Modernity, and Geopolitics by Eeva-Liisa Pelkonen

Ancient Churches of Ethiopia by David W. Phillipson

Lina Bo Bardi by Zeuler R. M. de A. Lima

Architect and Engineer: A Study in Sibling Rivalry by Andrew Saint

The Craftsman by Richard Sennett

Pornotopia: An Essay on Playboy’s Architecture and Biopolitics by Paul B. Preciado

Outlaw Territories: Environments of Insecurity/Architectures of Counterinsurgency by Felicity D. Scott

Forensic Architecture: Violence at the Threshold of Detectability by Eyal Weizman

 

See the full list of recent and upcoming programs associated with the New York Architecture Book Fair here.

 

The first edition of the New York Architecture Book Fair is supported by the New York Architecture Book Club, an invitation-based network of individuals and firms that serve as the key group behind the book fair.

 

Bookstores or cultural institutions interested in participating in the Bookstore Network should send an email to jk@storefrontnews.org.

 

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SUPPORT

 

The first edition of the New York Architecture Book Fair is supported by the New York Architecture Book Club, an invitation-based network of individuals and firms that serve as the key group behind the book fair. For a full list of members, see here.

 

Architecture Books – Yet to Be Written and the Bookstore Network are supported by the Royal Norwegian Consulate General, the Consulate General of Switzerland in New York, JESCO Lighting Group, Architectural Association Publications, ACTAR, Artbook | D.A.P., Dafne Editora, Harvard University Press, I. B. Tauris, Lars Müller Publishers, Park Books, Rizzoli Publications, University of California Press, University of Minnesota Press, Verso Books, Thames & Hudson, Reaktion Books, Editorial Gustavo Gili, Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, Marsilio,The MIT Press, The Monacelli Press, Tongji University Press, University of Chicago Press, Yale University Press, and Zone Books.

 

Programming partners for the New York Architecture Book Fair include The Cooper Union, the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at Columbia University, e-flux Architecture, and the New York Public Library.

 

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

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Book Launch: Juan Downey, 1940–1993

 

with editors Julieta González and Javier Rivero Ramos

 

97 Kenmare St

Saturday, June 29th, 2019

3–5 pm

 

[RSVP]

 

The relationship of culture to territory and political power is loaded with complexity and layered with history. Through an expanded understanding of what constitutes art and architecture, Chilean artist Juan Downey weaved together an insightful vision of the relationship between people and site that remains prescient today. Downey developed an interdisciplinary and intermedial practice grounded in the social and the political that simultaneously addressed environmental and anthropological concerns, examining society’s cultural shifts through video and interactive art, architecture, and cybernetics.

 

Presented as part of a new year-long public program called Building Cycles, Storefront for Art and Architecture partners with Ediciones MP to host the book launch of Juan Downey: 1940-1993. With the participation of book editors Julieta González and Javier Rivero Ramos, the event reflects the structure of the publication, chronologically positioning Juan Downey’s legacy against a historical background that frames his practice within a wider artistic and political context. 

 

Prior to the event, Aquí vive gente—Storefront’s first exhibition as part of Building Cycles—will be on view to the public. Both Aquí vive gente and the book launch of Juan Downey, 1940-1993 contribute to Storefront’s investigations into building community, understanding  place, and presenting work that challenges contemporary views of our built environments.

 

RSVP here.

 

About Juan Downey: 1940-1993

Dedicated to one of the most emblematic Chilean artists of the second-half of the twentieth century, this publication features the most comprehensive compilation of Juan Downey’s works to date together with novel critical approaches by leading specialists.

 

The first section gathers the work of Juan Downey in a chronological structure that emphasizes the dexterity with which he moved across media. Sketched against a historical background that frames his practice within a wider artistic and political context, the section also anthologizes the texts written by Downey and presents a varied collection of ephemera such as photographs, invitations and excerpts from his journal.

 

Responding to the history and work of Juan Downey are four essays by Julieta González, Felicity D. Scott, Francesco Pellizzi, and Edward Shanken. The essay by Julieta González maps Downey’s career according to his profound investment in cybernetic theory in order to posit the concept and phenomenon of feedback as central to his entire praxis. Felicity D. Scott places Downey in the context of Cold War geopolitics— –alongside American participation in the 1973 Chilean coup—– to highlight the tensions and stakes that run through Downey’s performative harnessing of telecommunications. The essay by Franceso Pellizzi delves into Downey’s journey to the Amazons and his time dwelling with the Yanomami foregrounding the mediatic unintelligibility deployed by Downey as a means to riddle anthropology’s subject/object dyad. Edward Shanken examines the iconic video The Laughing Alligator through the lens of surrealist ethnographic critique, recuperating the latent mysticism that animates not only Downey but also anthropologists ascribed to the Collège de Sociologie such as Michel Leiris.

 

About Juan Downey

Chilean artist Juan Downey is known primarily as a pioneer of video art and interactive art, although his oeuvre spreads across many mediums, examining the efficacy of technology in forms of expression. Born in 1940 in Santiago, Chile, Downey trained as an architect at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Upon graduation, he traveled to Europe to practice the fine arts, working with printmaking, until he moved to the United States. He became interested in media and feedback, as well as how they influence identity and representation. Working with emerging technologies, he was able to investigate these concepts, most famously in Video Trans Americas (1973-1977). Downey also worked as an Associate Professor at the School of Architecture and the School of Art and Design at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. Throughout his life, his work was exhibited internationally, and it still remains in the collections of institutions throughout Europe and the Americas. Downey died in New York in 1993.

 

About the Contributors

 

Julieta González works within the intersection of anthropology, cybernetics, architecture, design, and the visual arts, and has recently undertaken research and exhibitions addressing decolonial aesthetics in Latin America. She is the artistic director of the Museo Jumex in Mexico City, and has previously held curatorial positions at the Museu de Arte de São Paulo, São Paulo; Museo Tamayo, Mexico City; the Bronx Museum of the Arts, New York; Tate Modern, London; and the Museo Alejandro Otero and Museo de Bellas Artes in Caracas, Venezuela. She has curated more than 60 exhibitions in these venues and elsewhere. Her essays have been published in exhibition catalogues, books, magazines, and journals including Afterall.

 

Javier Rivero Ramos is a doctoral candidate at Princeton University’s Department of Art and Archeology, studying modern and contemporary art with a focus on Latin America. His research interests include international networks for artistic exchange in the latter half of the twentieth century and art under political and social duress. He is currently working on a monograph on Raphael Ortiz Montañez with El Museo del Barrio and a doctoral dissertation on the link between experimental poetry and mail art in South America.

 

Felicity D. Scott is the director of the PhD program in Architecture (History and Theory), and co-director of the program in Critical, Curatorial and Conceptual Practices in Architecture (CCCP) at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. Seeking to expand and complicate the subject matter and methodological frameworks through which modern and contemporary art, architecture, and media practices are addressed, her work attends to the institutions, discourses, and media-technical formats (exhibitions, publications, time-based media, etc.) that, along with broader social, economic, scientific, environmental, political, and geopolitical forces, have helped shape and define these disciplines. In addition to publishing numerous articles in journals, magazines, and edited anthologies, she has published Outlaw Territories: Environments of Insecurity/Architectures of Counter- Insurgency (Zone Books, 2016), Disorientation: Bernard Rudofsky in the Empire of Signs (Sternberg Press, 2016), Living Archive 7: Ant Farm (ACTAR, 2008), and Architecture or Techno-Utopia: Politics After Modernism (MIT Press, 2007).

 

Francesco Pelizzi is an Associate in Meso-American Ethnology and Editor of the multidisciplinary journal RES–Anthropology and Aesthetics at Harvard University’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. Additionally, he is a Co-Chair of the University Seminar on the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas at Columbia University.

 

Edward Shanken writes and teaches about contemporary art and new media. His recent writings include essays about art and software, sound art, ecological art, collaboration and innovation, and bridging the gap between new media and contemporary art. Since 2016, he has been an associate professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and has previously held teaching positions at the Rhode Island School of Design, University of Washington, and University of Amsterdam. His publications include: Systems (Whitechapel/MIT Press, 2015), Inventar el Futuro: Arte – Electricidad – Nuevos Medios (Departamento de Ficción, 2013), Art and Electronic Media (Phaidon, 2009), and Telematic Embrace: Visionary Theories of Art, Technology and Consciousness (University of California Press, 2003). He holds an MA and PhD in Art History from Duke University, an MBA from Yale University, and a BA in Studio Art from Haverford College.

 

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This event is presented as part of Storefront for Art and Architecture’s year-long program of exhibitions and events, Building Cycles. Founding support of Building Cycles is generously provided by Linde-Griffith Construction Company and the Graham Foundation.

 

 

 

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; KPF; ODA; Rockwell Group; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

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Aquí vive gente:
Museum of History and Community
of Puerta de Tierra

 

Aquí vive gente: Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra

Brigada Puerta de Tierra

June 1st – September 7th, 2019

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Sign the petition for the Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra here.

 

See photos from the opening here. 

 

#aquívivegente          @brigadapdt         @storefrontnyc

 

Aquí vive gente (people live here). Throughout the neighborhood of Puerta de Tierra in San Juan, Puerto Rico, murals with this refrain brighten the walls and convey to passersby the self-determination of a community that is taking agency over the future development of its neighborhood.

 

This vision of collective action and cultural preservation—born out of hope and necessity—has been channeled toward efforts to realize a groundbreaking new organization in Puerta de Tierra. Storefront for Art and Architecture is honored to host the Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra (MHC PDT). Previously housed only in the minds and living rooms of community members, this nascent museum is presented publicly for the first time ever at Storefront’s gallery space.

 

The museum emerged after years of work by Brigada Puerta de Tierra (BPDT), a multigenerational group of artists and activists. It puts forth the vision that the lived experiences of the people of Puerta de Tierra matter, and that they can uniquely tell the rich and complex histories of a community undergoing intense urban pressures that would drastically alter the character of its social fabric.

 

Brigada Puerta de Tierra is structured as a horizontal organization that uses art and storytelling as a tool for education. The group has its foundations in grassroots and collective action; it was formed in 2015 as a response to the construction of the controversial Paseo Puerta de Tierra, a major redevelopment project that lacked citizen involvement. With the goal of reclaiming the neighborhood, BPDT has been active ever since. Its members have cleaned, maintained, and transformed abandoned sites in Puerta de Tierra through creative initiatives such as mural-making, gardening, and other outdoor programs that bring neighbors together.

 

The Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra is BPDT’s most ambitious initiative to date. Over the last few months, Storefront has provided institutional support intended to help fulfill the museum’s mission (developed through self-led workshops) “to affirm, care for, and carry with pride and dignity the cultural legacy of the neighborhood through community participation, and to preserve the cultural heritage and collective memory of Puerta de Tierra.”

 

Currently without a long-term venue for the museum, Brigada Puerta de Tierra has been working toward rehabilitating and legally gaining access to the Edificio Infanzón, a historic building in Puerta de Tierra that has been abandoned for decades. After its presentation at Storefront, the MHCPDT will launch an international tour to create awareness of both the fragility and power of the neighborhood’s identity. Eventually, Brigada Puerta de Tierra aims to present the museum at its permanent home at the Edificio Infanzón.

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture and Brigada Puerta de Tierra welcome you to the inaugural public presentation of the Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra.

 

About Brigada Puerta de Tierra

Brigada Puerta de Tierra began in 2015, when a group of residents of Puerta de Tierra and Viejo San Juan joined in protest against the controversial Paseo Puerta de Tierra project for the lack of citizen inclusion in the design and planning process and for the environmental and cultural damages caused on the north coast of San Juan. Over the summer of 2015, the group, along with children and young people from the neighborhood who immediately showed interest in collaborating, began to create murals and engage in other activities in response to the Paseo Puerta de Tierra project.

 

This group, now known as Brigada Puerta de Tierra, focuses on the reactivation of abandoned areas and preservation of the neighborhood’s history and living culture. Uniting under the slogan “aquí vive gente,” BPDT is organized horizontally and collectively, and operates through four key concepts: self-management, awareness, strategic planning, and collective decision-making. For its various neighborhood initiatives and community activities since 2015, BPDT was recognized with the Merit and Dedication Award of the 46th edition of the Fiestas of San Sebastián Street for its commitment to its community and national culture.

 

In addition to this exhibition, Brigada Puerta de Tierra is being honored at Storefront’s 2019 Spring Benefit on Wednesday, May 29th at La Marqueta. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.storefrontbenefit.org.

 

CREDITS

Aquí vive gente: Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra by Brigada Puerta de Tierra. Storefront for Art and Architecture, 2019.

 

A Project by Brigada Puerta de Tierra (BPDT)

Collectively developed by members of BPDT and residents of Puerta de Tierra, with special thanks to www.puertadetierra.info.

 

Hosted by Storefront for Art and Architecture

José Esparza Chong Cuy, Executive Director and Chief Curator

Jinny Khanduja, Deputy Director

Jessica Kwok, Gallery and Operations Manager

Patrick Jaojoco, Development and Communications Associate

Iara Pimenta, Curatorial Fellow

Chialin Chou, Associate Curator of Archives

Interns: Lin Sen Chai, Ellen Eberhardt, Ramses Gonzalez, Hana Halilaj, Caroline Taylor Koh Smith, Ipek Kosova, Daniel Li, Adela Locsin, Amora McConnell, Karen Wang

Graphic Design Assistance by Estudio Herrera

 

 

SUPPORT

 

Brigada Puerta de Tierra is the recipient of the 2017 Visible Award (Cittadellarte – Fondazione Pistoletto, Fondazione Zegna), funding from which has supported this exhibition.

 

 

Aquí vive gente is the first exhibition of Storefront for Art and Architecture’s year-long program of exhibitions and events, Building Cycles. Founding support of Building Cycles is generously provided by Linde-Griffith Construction Company and the Graham Foundation.

 

 

 

 

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; KPF; ODA; Rockwell Group; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

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