SMART CITIES?

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SMART CITIES?

(Impossible Objects, Political Objects, and Measuring Objects)

 

Sunday, April 23rd, 2017

12 – 6 pm

 

The New School

Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Auditorium (Room N101)

66 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

 

[RSVP]

 

#SmartCitiesQuestionMark   #CityForces   @storefrontnyc   @NieuweInstituut   @newschool

 

What do we talk about when we talk about smart cities? How do we measure the smartness of a city? Who measures it? For whom? What are the tools, values, and constituencies involved in  measuring the built environment and the human edifices that inhabit them?

 

Smart Cities? is a conference of fictional and critical thoughts that seeks to debate and measure the measuring of cities and the various urban epistemological models that define urbanization and development in the 21st century.

 

Organized in three panels: Impossible Objects, Political Objects, and Measuring Objects, the event presents a series of performances and presentations that bring architects, scholars, artists, sociologists, and scientists together to discuss the means and methods by which we think—and dream—about cities and urbanism, from the planetary scale to the city of New York.

 

Participants will present New Terms, New Indexes, and New Tools, bringing alive fictional and real pieces of technology, methodology, machine processes, information systems, and critical reflection in order to better understand and develop new and old forms of intelligence that shape our contemporary cities.

From biologically engineered urban agents to new cartographies, from technosolutionist approaches to postcolonial studies, Smart Cities? will present a series of projects, reflections, and propositional values that reflect upon notions of safety, fun, health, activism, education, infrastructure, diversity, memory, and the environment. Ultimately, the conference serves as a forum to compel us to rethink the way in which various forms of knowledge are produced and reproduced within the value systems of our cities.

 

Smart Cities? is free and open to the public. Limited seating is available on a first come, first served basis. To RSVP see here

 

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SMART CITIES? SCHEDULE:

 

INTRODUCTION

12:00 pm

Welcome and Introduction by Eva Franch and Shannon Mattern

 

PANEL 1

Impossible Objects (New Terms / New Constituencies)

12:00pm to 2:00pm, Moderated by Shannon Mattern

#ImpossibleObjects

 

With Jürgen Hermann Mayer, Lydia Matthews, Jorge Otero-Pailos, Vyjayanthi Rao, David Smiley, and Luke Swarthout

 

The city, despite its multiple formal and political structures, is a constantly changing body. What are the historical forms of knowing and sensing the city? What are its yet-to-be-identified intelligences and values? What new terminology do we need to build on those grounds? Each panelist will present a new term (a neologism, appropriation, portmanteau…) that defines and describes important means of knowing and sensing a specific city.

 

PANEL 2

Political Objects (New Values / Indexes)

2:00 to 4:00 pm, Moderated by Marina Otero

#PoliticalObjects

 

With Dorit Avganim, Dawn BarberMatthijs BouwIngrid Burrington, Farzin Lotfi-Jam / Mark Wasiuta, and Jim Venturi

 

Rapidly changing geographies of urban settlement, growth, and struggle in early 21st-century capitalism are transforming basic understandings of the city. What intelligences enable us to navigate across the disparate political spheres that define the city? Who owns, acquires, sells, shares urban intelligence? How might we form new alliances to reorient or subvert measurement and surveillance systems so they can aid in the creation of a more equitable metropolis? Each panelist will present a new index that provides a new indicator about the value of cities.

 

PANEL 3

Objects of Measurement (New Tools/New Typologies)

4:00 to 6:00 pm, Moderated by Eva Franch

#MeasuringObjects

 

With Paolo CirioAriane Lourie Harrison, Agnieszka Kurant, and Jeff Maki

 

To measure, to quantify the physical and intangible dimensions of a place, is to articulate facts in order to construct values. What can be measured can be capitalized, historicized, distributed, or sold. By creating new standards and guidelines for measurement we have the potential to affect new epistemologies and ideologies, to make new claims about “what counts.” How might we design new measuring tools that change how and what we measure—how we assign value—in our cities.” ? Each panelist will present a new tool that expands our understanding of the city.

 

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The conference is organized by Storefront for Art and Architecture in collaboration with The New School and the Urban Epistemologies seminar by Shannon Mattern, Kate Fisher, and Jack Wilkinson.

 

Smart Cities? is presented as part of City Forces, a year-long joint cultural crossover program between Storefront for Art and Architecture and Het Nieuwe Instituut, with the Netherlands Consulate General in New York. This event is presented as part of Control Syntax Rio, an exhibition on view at Storefront for Art and Architecture through May 20th, 2017. Special exhibition support for Control Syntax Rio is generously provided by Samsung and FoyerLive.

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

 

 

 

 

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Definition Series: Resilience

Definition Series: Resilience

Thursday, April 13th, 2017

7 – 9 pm

 

#resilience    #definitionseries   @storefrontnyc

 

With Beatriz Colomina, Cooking Sections (Daniel Fernández Pascual and Alon Schwabe)Mark Linder, Laura McGuire, Carrie Norman, and Stephen Phillips

 

In his Manifesto on Tensionism (1925), Frederick Kiesler declared that we must have “NO MORE WALLS,” promoting instead “organic” architecture with an “elasticity of building adequate to the elasticity of living.” Seeking to break down physical and social boundaries in our everyday lives through a wide-variety of media (art, architecture, animation, furniture, exhibition, and theater design), Kiesler aimed to challenge the static forms of modern construction by creating more open, inclusive, and resilient building structures and practices.

 

“Resilience” has been appropriated by various fields ranging from sustainability and environmental studies to urban design. Definition Series: Resilience reflects upon Kiesler’s ideas, addressing the possibility of architecture to spring back into multiple shapes while facing shifting cultural and political realities.

 

The event invites historians, theorists, and practitioners to each present a definition of “resilience” as a point of departure for discussing a more resistant and liberatory “elastic architecture.”

 

Definition Series: Resilience is hosted by Storefront in collaboration with the Cal Poly LA Metro Program in Architecture and Urban Design and its founding director: architect, historian, and theorist Dr. Stephen J. Phillips, the author of Elastic Architecture: Frederick Kiesler and Design Research in the First Age of Robotic Culture (MIT Press).

 

About the Book:

 

In Elastic Architecture, Stephen Phillips offers the first in-depth exploration of Kiesler’s innovative and multidisciplinary research and design practice. Phillips argues that Kiesler established a new career trajectory for architects not as master builders, but as research practitioners whose innovative means and methods could advance alternative and speculative architecture. Indeed, Kiesler’s own career was the ultimate uncompromising model of a research-based practice.

 

Exploring Kiesler’s formative relationships with the European avant-garde, Phillips shows how Kiesler found inspiration in the plastic arts, experimental theater, early animation, and automatons to develop and refine his spatial concept of the Endless. Moving from Europe to New York in the 1920s, Kiesler applied these radical Dadaist, constructivist, and surrealist practices to his urban display projects, which included shop windows for Saks Fifth Avenue. After launching his innovative Design Correlation Laboratory at Columbia and Yale, Kiesler went on to invent new houses, theaters, and galleries that were meant to move, shift, and adapt to evolutionary changes occurring within the natural and built environment. Although many of Kiesler’s designs remained unbuilt, his ideas proved influential to later generations of architects and speculative artists internationally, including Archigram, Greg Lynn, UNStudio, and Olafur Eliasson.

 

About the Definition Series:

Each iteration of Storefront’s Definition Series invites participants to produce definitions of a specific key term constructing a multifaceted edifice around particular terms and their contemporary usage in specific fields, contexts and practices.

 

About the Participants

 

Beatriz Colomina is an internationally renowned architectural historian and theorist who has written extensively on questions of architecture and media. Ms. Colomina has taught in the School since 1988, and is the Founding Director of the Program in Media and Modernity at Princeton University, a graduate program that promotes the interdisciplinary study of forms of culture that came to prominence during the last century and looks at the interplay between culture and technology. In 2006-2007 she curated, with a group of Princeton Ph.D. students, the exhibition “Clip/Stamp/Fold: The Radical Architecture of Little Magazines 196X-197X” at the Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York and the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) in Montreal.

 

Cooking Sections (Daniel Fernández Pascual & Alon Schwabe) is a London-based independent duo of spatial practitioners. They explore the systems that organise the world through food. Using installation, performance and mapping, their research-based practice operates within the overlapping boundaries between visual arts, architecture and geopolitics. Recent projects include The Empire Remains Shop, a public installation that speculated on the possibility and implications of selling back the remains of the British Empire in London. Their book about the project will be published by Books On Architecture and the City, Columbia University Press in 2017. They have performed and exhibited extensively in the UK and internationally and have been part of OFFICEUS, US Pavilion, 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale, and residents of The Politics of Food programme at Delfina Foundation. Their work has appeared at the V&A, Glasgow International, Arnolfini, Fiorucci Art Trust, The Showroom; CCA, Glasgow; De Appel, Amsterdam; dOCUMENTA(13); Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin; HNI, Rotterdam; Museet for Samtidskunst, Roskilde; CA2M, Madrid; and UTS Art, Sydney, amongst others. They were part of the 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale and 2016 Brussels ParckDesign. Their writing has been published in Sternberg Press, Lars Müller, Volume Magazine, The Avery Review, and The Forager. They have been recently selected for a residency at Headlands Center for the Arts, San Francisco, where they will research the financialisation of the environment in California. Their ongoing Climavore project focusing on the making of the coast of Britain will be launched in the Isle of Skye, Scotland in 2018, commissioned by Atlas Arts. They lecture regularly at international institutions and lead a studio course at the School of Architecture, Royal College of Art, London.

 

Mark Linder is a Professor at the Syracuse University School of Architecture. His research explores design theory and history considered in a transdisciplinary framework and is focused on modern architecture since 1950. He is the author of Nothing Less than Literal: Architecture after Minimalism (MIT 2004) and is currently at work on a book titled That’s Brutal, What’s Modern? which argues that the intellectual formation and design practices of The New Brutalism offer an early, exemplary case of modern architecture coming to terms with image culture. He has taught as a visiting professor at the University of Michigan, Harvard, University of Illinois-Chicago, Rice University, IIT, RISD, and UCLA.

 

Laura McGuire is an architecture and design historian. She is Assistant Professor of History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of Architecture at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa. Her research has focused on American and Central European architecture and design of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the role of immigrants in twentieth century American design culture before World War II. Her essays have appeared in books and journals, including Endless Kiesler (Birkhäuser, 2015), Frederick Kiesler: Theatervisionäre – Architekt – Künstler (KHM/Brandstätter, 2012), and Norman Bel Geddes Designs America (Abrams, 2012). She is currently editing a collection of Frederick Kiesler’s unpublished theoretical writings, and completing a book on his experience as an immigrant American architect and designer. She previously taught at the School of Architecture + Design at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and at the School of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin.

 

Carrie Norman is a founding partner of the New York and Chicago-based design collaborative, Norman Kelley. Her professional and theoretical work re-examines architecture and design’s relationship to vision, prompting its observers to see nuance in the familiar. The practice has contributed work to the 14th Venice Biennial (2014) and the inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial (2015). The practice was a recipient of the Architecture League of New York Young Architect’s Prize (2014). The design work, which includes a collection of American Windsor chairs, is currently represented by Volume Gallery, in Chicago. Norman received a Bachelor of Science in Architecture with Honors from the University of Virginia and a Master in Architecture from Princeton University. She is a licensed architect in the state of New York, and previously worked as a Senior Architect with SHoP Architects, in New York City. Currently, Norman is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Columbia’s GSAPP, NJIT, and Barnard College.

 

Stephen Phillips is principal architect in the California firm Stephen Phillips Architects (SPARCHS). He is Professor of Architecture at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo and Founding Director of the Cal Poly Los Angeles Metropolitan Program in Architecture and Urban Design. He has taught as a Visiting Assistant Professor and Lecturer at University of California, Berkeley and Los Angeles, Southern California Institute of Architecture, and California College of the Arts. Phillips received his B.A. with Distinction in Architecture from Yale University, his M.Arch. with the award for best studio thesis from the University of Pennsylvania, and his Ph.D. in Architecture History/Theory from Princeton University. Phillips publishes and lectures widely on modern design, technology, media, and contemporary urban culture. He is the recipient of numerous awards, grants, and fellowships including those from the Getty Research Institute, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Graham Foundation, the Bruno Zevi Foundation, the AIA, and the ACSA for his projects, teaching, and writing. He is the author of L.A. [Ten]: Interviews on Los Angeles Architecture 1970s-1990s by Lars Müller Publishers, and Elastic Architecture: Frederick Kiesler and Design Research in the First Age of Robotic Culture by MIT Press, 2017.

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

Special support for Definition Series: Resilience is provided by ARC Reprographics, Bulthaup, CSDA Architecture, HMC Architects, Morphosis Architects, and Theatre DNA.

 

 

 

 

Manifesto Series: At Extremes

Manifesto Series: At Extremes

Tuesday, March 21st, 2017

7 – 9 pm

 

#atextremes    #manifestoseries   @storefrontnyc

 

With Jordan Carver, Mitchell JoachimJanette Kim, Lola Sheppard, Andy Vann, and Srdjan Jovanovic Weiss

 

The condition of extremes suggests a tipping point: a moment in which a system shifts from one state to another (often unpredictable) state. 

 

Ulrick Beck, in Risk Society, argues that “being at risk is the way of being and ruling in the world of modernity…global risk is the human condition at the beginning of the twenty-first century.” Until recently, the developed world has largely been successful in displacing the economic, environmental, and political impact of its development to other nations and peoples, or in directing externalities of development toward other groups and stakeholders within their own nations, rendering the risk invisible in its original context.

 

However, with the financial crisis of 2008 and the increasingly tangible impacts of climate change, complete displacement of risk is no longer possible. When one group or region seemingly achieves stability, another will likely lose it. A key factor in understanding extreme systems is the ability to interpret their relationship to risk. The further we move away from a state of equilibrium, the more volatile the extremes, the more exposed we are to danger and loss, and the more risk we take on. 

 

Manifesto Series: At Extremes discusses how architecture, infrastructure, and technology negotiate limits and operate in conditions of imbalance. Do the risk/reward models prevalent on the trading floors of global financial markets and in speculative real estate projects hold up in disciplines related to design?

 

How can the entangled relationship between risk and extreme conditions be leveraged in a new and productive model; one that emphasizes speculation as a way to test scenarios, outcomes, and tools? What is the role of design in such contexts? To document? To redress? To mitigate? To capitalize on new opportunities? Does the progressive destabilization of political, social, and environmental conditions render design more relevant, or less so?

 

Participants will draw upon Bracket Vol 3. At Extremes, edited by Lola Sheppard and Maya Przybylski, to present a manifesto for or against the positive correlation of risk and extreme circumstances as a productive tool for models in architecture.

 

About the Book:

Bracket is an almanac that highlights emerging critical issues at the juncture of architecture, environment, and digital culture. The series looks at thematics in our age of globalization that are shaping the built environment in unexpected yet radically significant ways.

 

About the Manifesto Series:

Each iteration of Storefront’s Manifesto Series invites participants to denounce a present or past condition, proclaim an alternative present, past or future situation, and indicate a strategy or method of action.

 

About the Participants

 

Jordan Carver

Jordan H. Carver is a writer, researcher, and educator who writes on space, politics, and culture. He is the author of the upcoming book Spaces of Disappearance: The Architecture of Extraordinary Rendition (Urban Research, 2017). Jordanis a contributing editor to the Avery Review, a core member of Who Builds Your Architecture? and a Henry M. MacCracken Doctoral Fellow in American Studies at New York University.

 

Mitchell Joachim

Co-Founder, Terreform ONE and Associate Professor of Practice, NYU. Formerly, an architect at Frank Gehry and I.M. Pei. Selected by Wired magazine for “The Smart List” and Rolling Stone for “The 100 People Who Are Changing America”. His honors include; ARCHITECT R+D Award, Fulbright Scholarship, TED Fellowship, Moshe Safdie Fellow, AIA NY Urban Design Merit Award, 1st Place International Architecture Award, Victor Papanek Social Design Award, Zumtobel Group Award, History Channel Award, and Time magazine’s Best Invention with MIT Smart Cities. Co-authored books, “XXL – XS: New Directions in Ecological Design,” “Super Cells: Building with Biology,” and “Global Design: Elsewhere Envisioned”. PhD at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MAUD Harvard University, MArch Columbia University.

 

Janette Kim

Janette Kim is an architectural designer, researcher, and educator based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Her work focuses on design and ecology in relationship to public representation, interest, and debate. Janette is assistant professor of architecture and co-director of the Urban Works Agency at California College of the Arts, founding principal of the design practice All of the Above, and founding editor of ARPA Journal, a digital publication on applied research practices in architecture. Janette was also Assistant Professor at Syracuse University from 2015-2016 and Adjunct Assistant Professor from 2005-2015 at Columbia University, where she directed the Applied Research Practices in Architecture initiative and the Urban Landscape Lab.

 

Lola Sheppard / Lateral Office

Lola Sheppard is co-founder, together with Mason White, of Lateral Office, a design practice that operates at the intersection of architecture, landscape, and urbanism. The studio describes its process as a commitment to design as a research vehicle to pose and respond to complex, urgent questions in the built environment, engaging in the wider context and climate of a project– social, ecological, or political. Lateral Office have been pursuing research and design work on the role of architecture in remote regions, particularly the North, for the past seven years.

 

Lateral’s work has been exhibited and lectured extensively across the USA, Canada and Europe.  Lateral Office are the authors of the upcoming book Many Norths: Spatial Practice in a Polar Territory (Actar 2017) and of Pamphlet Architecture 30, COUPLING: Strategies for Infrastructural Opportunism, published by Princeton Architectural Press (2011). Sheppard and White are also co-editors of the journal Bracket, together with Neeraj  Bhatia and Maya Przybylski.

 

Andy Vann

Andy Vann is an organizer, educator, parent and architect based in Brooklyn. He has taught at City Tech, City College and Columbia GSAPP and is currently working at Paul Castrucci Architect.

 

Srdjan Jovanovic Weiss

Srdjan Jovanovic Weiss is a research architect producing exhibitions, books, lectures, installations and buildings. He founded NAO for design and co-founded SMS (School of Missing Studies) for urban studies. He researched for Herzog & de Meuron, designed for Richard Gluckman as well as collaborated with Jenny Holzer, Robert Wilson and Marjetica Potrc. He was a swimmer competing within the national junior league of Yugoslavia.

 

Support

 

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

   

Control Syntax Rio

CSR_Mon_Mar_27

Control Syntax Rio

 

Curated and designed by Farzin Lotfi-Jam and Mark Wasiuta
Presented by Storefront for Art and Architecture and Het Nieuwe Instituut, Rotterdam.

 

March 28th, 2017 – May 20th, 2017

97 Kenmare St, New York, NY

 

#controlsyntaxrio   @storefrontnyc

 

Rio de Janeiro is one of the most visible sites of “smart city” experimentation. In response to catastrophic natural disasters, calamitous traffic congestion, and urban health epidemics, the Centro de Operações Rio (COR) was designed as a corrective tool and as a new command and control hub that would allow the city to prepare for the 2016 Olympic Games. Launched in 2010, COR now monitors its urban camera network and information sensors, gauges optimal traffic patterns, determines landslide risk zones, predicts weather disruptions, and maps disease paths.

 

Rio’s wild topography, wealth disparities, and aging infrastructure make it an unlikely testing ground for the smooth rationality of urban management that “smart city” rhetoric proclaims. Through COR, the predictable impression of Rio de Janeiro as a lush playground of beaches and samba dancers conflicts with the new image of a Rio governed by smart city control systems. As the city also becomes increasingly marked by extreme police tactics and political protests, Rio appears less a case of urban optimization than a platform for viewing the conflicts that have erupted around urban data management, civil rights, and issues of social control. Yet, COR is also a sign of a new form of participatory civic politics. Citizens may visit the COR building to observe its image screens, data displays, and information collection technologies. In this way, COR serves as a public relations space from which the city broadcasts an image of urban administrative control.

 

The exhibition shows Rio structured through COR’s control syntax and smart city command processes. This syntax is assembled from seemingly banal “if-then” statements that become surprisingly charged by their encounters with the political and circulatory life of the city. Through COR, the exhibition sees traffic engineering as urban politics and as haunted by potential catastrophe. The exhibition also understands COR as indicative of an important new space of representation for the 21st century city and its emerging computational governmentality.

 

Exhibition Credits

Curators: Farzin Lotfi-Jam, Mark Wasiuta

Exhibition Design: Sharif Anous, Farzin Lotfi-Jam, Mark Wasiuta

Graphic Design: MTWTF

Exhibition Design and Production Assistance: Florencia Alvarez, Javier Bidot-Betancourt, John Dwyer, Jennifer Komorowski, Chelsea Meyer, Jacqui Robbins, Miranda Römer, Augustine Savage, Jen Wood

Sound Design: Sonic Platforms (Michael Christopher, Max Lauter)

Film Voiceover: Louise Dreier

Audio Recording: Marco Pavão

Videography: Terry Barentsen

 

This project has been made possible through the initiative and leadership of the teams at Het Nieuwe Instituut, led by Guus Beumer (Artistic Director) and Marina Otero Verzier (Head of Research), and at Storefront, led by Eva Franch (Chief Curator and Executive Director).

 

About the Curators

 

Farzin Lotfi-Jam is Principal of farzinfarzin, a multidisciplinary studio that designs spaces, software, and media. He is faculty in the architecture program at Columbia University and holds advanced degrees from Columbia University and RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia. He is a fellow of the Akademie Schloss Solitude in Stuttgart and was previously the 2013-2014 Sanders Fellow at the University of Michigan. His research has been funded by the Veski organization and the Graham Foundation, and has been collected by the Centre Pompidou in Paris. He has been exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, AIGA/NY Annex, the Oslo Architecture Triennale, the Venice Architecture Biennale, among others.

 

Mark Wasiuta is Co-Director of the MS degree program Critical, Curatorial and Conceptual Practices in Architecture at Columbia GSAPP. Over the last decade, as Director of Exhibitions at GSAPP, he has developed a body of research and archival exhibitions that focus on under-examined practices of the postwar period. Recent exhibitions, produced with various collaborators, include  “Every Building in Baghdad: The Rifat Chadirji Archives at the Arab Image Foundation,” “Environmental Communications: Contact High,” “Information Fall-Out: Buckminster Fuller’s World Game,” and “Les Levine: Bio-Tech Rehearsals 1967-1973.” His work has appeared at the Graham Foundation, the Istanbul Design Biennial, the Venice Architecture Biennale, Het Nieuwe Instituut, the Chicago Architecture Biennial, and elsewhere. He directs Collecting Architecture Territories, a multi-year research program that analyses global art institutions that have emerged from private collections. Wasiuta is recipient of recent grants from the Asian Cultural Council, the Graham Foundation, and NYSCA.

 

About Het Nieuwe Instituut
Het Nieuwe Instituut aims to illuminate and map a rapidly changing world while at the same time fostering discussion of topics related to the vast field of design. All the institute’s activities are grounded in the principles of design and innovation – two concepts bound up with changing value systems and conflict. Het Nieuwe Instituut organises exhibitions, lectures and fellowships, carries out research and development projects, and publishes reports on the outcomes of its projects.

 

Exhibition Support

Control Syntax Rio is presented in New York City as part of a year-long joint cultural crossover program between Storefront for Art and Architecture and Het Nieuwe Instituut. The partnership, supported by the Netherlands Consulate General in New York, seeks to examine the relationships of power between those involved in the construction of the contemporary city through a series of events, exhibitions, and projects to be developed in New York, Rotterdam, and other cities around the world. Control Syntax Rio was commissioned by Het Nieuwe Instituut, where it was presented from June 2016 to January 2017. Special exhibition support for Control Syntax Rio is generously provided by Samsung and FoyerLive.

 

foyerlive_full_colour

 

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

Cabaret Series: ha ha ha (The Funny, the Witty, and the Grotesque)

Cabaret Series: ha ha ha (The Funny, the Witty, and the Grotesque)

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

7 – 9 pm

 

#funnywittygrotesque    #cabaretseries   @storefrontnyc

 

With Beverly Fre$h, Brian Hubble, Vivian Lee, Tucker Marder, Thom Moran, and Mike Perry

 

Laughter, giggles, grins, and smirks – actions that often originate as spontaneous and instinctive expressions of amusement – create a sense of self-awareness. That which we find funny can be genuinely ground-breaking, changing people’s perspectives by signaling common spaces of understanding.

 

Humor is a subversion of conventions. Seldom the focus in dominant discourses of art, design, and architecture, there is a recurring interest in the explorations of irony, satire, and the grotesque as a means of critique of the status quo. Humor has a unique and particular potency in responding to turbulent political moments. It can deflect anger, serve as therapy in the face of traumatic events, and undermine prevailing ideologies. Can humor also promote new forms of a more optimistic practice, able to overcome anger, yet effective enough to produce change?

 

Presented during Paranoia Man in a Rat Fink Room, an installation by Freeman & Lowe, Cabaret Series: ha ha ha (The Funny, the Witty, and the Grotesque) invites artists, architects, designers, and curators to explore the intersections between humor, art, and architecture through performance and discussion.

 

About the Cabaret Series:

Each iteration of Storefront’s Cabaret Series develops modes of expression that engage with contemporary discourses in a playful and humorous manner. The events have the aim to produce new modes of communication between speakers, performers, and spectators through provocation, seduction, and immediacy.

 

About the Participants

 

Beverly Fre$h has broken several Guinness Book World Records; including breaking the most eggs on his head and compiling the tallest stack of rap tapes. Beverly has exhibited throughout the US and internationally, including China, Japan, Peru, Poland, Ukraine, Czech Republic, France and Germany. Recent exhibitions include, MR MDWST – A REAL GOOD TIME (2015), a solo exhibition at the Cranbrook Museum of Art. He is co-founder of sUPERIORbelly, a record label based in Detroit; cofounder of WILD AMERICAN DOGS; and co-founder of the Archive of Midwestern Culture. He is an Associate Professor and Area Head of Graphic Art at DePaul University in Chicago.

 

Brian Hubble lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.  Recent exhibitions include MOCA in Los Angeles, Fastnet in Brooklyn, and Less is More Projects in Paris and Brussels. He is the co-director of Unisex Salon, an artist-run contributive platform for voices of the multi-disciplinary community. Hubble completed his MFA at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he was the recipient of the William Merchant R. French Fellowship.

 

WH Vivian Lee is the co-founder of LAMAS, a studio that is currently really excited by ornament, optical illusions, and lazy forms. Together with her partner James Macgillivray, they have experimented on these topics through school research, in temporary installations, and on permanent buildings. Lee is a U.S. registered architect who lives in Toronto.

 

Tucker Marder is an artist, filmmaker and plantsman. He has collaborated with institutions such as The National Aviary, The Nature Conservancy and Phipps Conservatory. Tucker is a recipient of the Frank Ratchye Grant for Art at the Frontier and in 2016 was named a Redford Center Grant Honoree. Tucker’s performance “STAMPEDE!”, comprised of over 200 live Crested Runner Ducks and large motorized abstract puppets premiered as part of the 2015 Parrish Road Show. Tucker is the founder of the Folly Tree Arboretum, a collection of over 175 rare and unusual trees intent on showcasing nature’s sense of humor. Tucker received his MFA from Carnegie Mellon University.

 

Thom Moran is an American architect, designer, and educator. He joined the University of Michigan’s Taubman College as the 2009-2010 Muschenheim Fellow where he is currently an assistant professor. Humor and lightheartedness are at the center of his practice, which involves solo projects and several ongoing collaborations that each explore particular issues. THING THING is a Detroit-based design collaborative that makes things with plastic, using novel fabrication methods to hijack post-consumer material ecologies. With Meredith Miller he works on an architectural scale, exploring media and environment as sources for multiple, simultaneous effects. Thom and Michael Savona collect designs that engage the relationship between people, interiors, and objects at Frontieriors.

 

Mike Perry is an artist, animator, creative director, brand consultant, poet, and designer. His work encompasses paintings, drawings, sculptures, art installations, books, murals, all of which are made to conjure that feeling of soul-soaring you have when you stare into distant galaxies on a dark night, when you go on long journeys into the imagination, when you laugh and can’t stop laughing. Key to Mike’s working method is the recognition that art and objects, go through many iterations—discoveries, coverings, uncoverings—until they’re finished; people do the same until they are fully revealed. He likes to cultivate collectives of celebration, exhibition, and revelation.

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

   

Call for Ideas: Independent Projects

Apply for a NYSCA Grant through Storefront
 
 
Closed Worlds, 2016. Storefront for Art and Architecture. Photo by Jake Naughton.
 
Do you have an idea for a project that promotes alternatives? This year, Storefront will sponsor twenty independent architecture and design projects through NYSCA.
 
WHAT IS THE GRANT?
The Architecture + Design Program of the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) awards project grants for individuals or teams through its Independent Projects category. These grants, of up to $10,000, are awarded to architects, landscape architects, graphic designers, fashion designers, industrial designers, and interior designers to “creatively explore or research an issue or problem in the design, planning, and/or historic preservation fields that advances the field and contributes to the public’s understanding of the built environment.”
 
NYSCA seeks projects that are innovative in nature and emphasize the artistry of design excellence. Projects may lead to the creation of design prototypes, explore new technology that impacts design, research a topic in design or architectural history, or engage in critical or theoretical analyses.
 
Storefront will sponsor up to 20 projects for 2018 calendar year. Priority will be given to applications that align with Storefront’s organizational mission to advance innovative and critical positions that go beyond disciplinary and ideological boundaries.
 
To read more information, see page 48 of NYSCA’s funding guidelines.
 
HOW DO I APPLY?
1. Complete the initial application form and send to Andrew Emmet, Development and Outreach Associate at Storefront, by emailing ae@storefrontnews.org with the subject line “NYSCA Independent Project Application Request” no later than midnight on February 20, 2017.
 
2. If you are selected as one of the 20 projects sponsored by Storefront, you will be asked to submit a full project proposal no later than midnight on March 10, 2017
 
3. Additional application materials may be required in order to complete the submission. All additional materials must be received before March 20, 2017.
 
AM I ELIGIBLE?
Grants are for individuals or groups, and applicants must be New York State residents at the time of application and while the project is being implemented. Student and faculty work that serves as part of a course curriculum is ineligible. Projects submitted by current students or faculty must demonstrate that the work was not part of a course curriculum. Note that individuals or teams may not apply for another NYSCA project with another team or with another fiscal sponsor organization. If individuals appear on more than one request, both requests will be ineligible for support. Further eligibility requirements may apply. 
 
WHAT IS THE TIMELINE?
NYSCA Independent Project Grants cannot be used to support past work or current client work. They are intended to support new ideas and explorations that further the evolution of relevant design fields. Therefore, projects must take place between January 2018 and December 2018.
 
HOW CAN I LEARN MORE?
The complete program guidelines and application instructions are available here. NYSCA also produced an Independent Projects Webinar, embedded below. For additional information, visit www.nysca.org.
 

 

Cabaret Series: Old Methods for New Wars

 

Cabaret Series: Old Methods for New Wars

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

7 – 9 pm

 

#oldmethodsnewwars    #cabaretseries   @storefrontnyc

 

With A.Bandit, Mahdi Gilbert, Matt Holtzclaw, Wally Ingram, Noah Levine, Prakash Puru, and special guests

 

We begin the year in a time of heightened crisis, a moment of contradiction during which our belief systems about the world are being challenged daily. Today, more than ever before, there is a need to explore the paradoxical, to be present while being invisible, and to escape while infiltrating.

 

Letters from Prison,” Antonio Gramsci’s seminal work, presented to the world an understanding of the conflicted and complex functions of cultural hegemony, and was a critical tool for freedom that was created in a moment of confinement.

 

Cabaret Series: Old Methods for New Wars will present several magical performances as metaphorical “letters from prison.” The performances demonstrate the power of magic as a tool to understand the nature of transformation, freedom, and ultimately, hope.

 

This special evening, conceived of by A.BANDIT, will bring together dialogue and magic, with performances from some of the most noteworthy magicians in the field.

 

About the Cabaret Series:

Each iteration of Storefront’s Cabaret Series develops modes of expression that engage with the social, political, and physical space of Storefront in a playful and humorous manner. The events aim to produce new modes of communication between speakers, performers, and spectators through provocation, seduction, and immediacy.

 

About A.Bandit:

A.Bandit is an experimental performance art group started by conceptual artist Glenn Kaino and conceptual magician Derek DelGaudio. Formed as an alliance with the intention of creating a new performative medium between the worlds of art and magic, A.Bandit has performed their spectacular psycho-spatial interventions at such venues as The Kitchen, NYC; The Geffen Playhouse, Los Angeles; Pershing Square Signature Center, NYC; Soho House, Los Angeles; Art LA Contemporary in Santa Monica; and LAXART Annex in Hollywood, where they have taken residence for six months opening up what they called a conceptual magic shop called ‘The Space Between.” Their first artist monogram will come out this year from Prestel/Delmonico, and their most recent production “In & Of Itself” just finished a 16-week sold out run at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles and is coming to New York in Spring 2017.

 

Follow the links below for more information about the participants:

A.Bandit

Mahdi Gilbert

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

   

Drawing Series: A Line

Drawing Series: A Line

Wednesday, January 25th, 2017

7 – 9 pm

FXFOWLE

22 West 19th St, 11th Floor, New York, NY

 

#aline    #fastbuildings   #drawingseries    

 

With Koray Duman, Michael Manfredi, Sandro MarpilleroMargery Perlmutter, and Charles Renfro

 

What constitutes a line? A vector, a division, a labyrinth, a world?

On the occasion of the closing of Fast Buildings, Storefront presented Drawing Series: A Line. The program invited participants to draw a single, continuous line for seven minutes while articulating the ideas behind their drawing decisions.

 

Fast Buildings was a pop-up show at FXFOWLE’s gallery space that presented works from recent iterations of Storefront’s drawing show, including Aesthetics / Anesthetics (2012), POP: Protocols Obsessions Positions (2013), Measure (2015), and Sharing Models (2016). The drawing show invited a select group of participants to interrogate the architectural drawing, using Storefront’s gallery space or the island of Manhattan as a site to explore and reflect upon specific topics—from aesthetic clichés to disciplinary obsessions to data visualization—in order to present innovative architectural ideas.

 

A Line was part of Storefront’s Drawing Series in which scholars and practitioners engage in the simultaneous acts of narration and drawing, using tools that range from pen and paper to digital devices. The events invoke a discussion around the relationship between modes of production and their representation. A real-time video feed of the drawing process records and displays the performance for the audience.

 

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

   

Salon Series: Urban Data Operations

Salon Series: Urban Data Operations  

Wednesday, January 18th, 2017

– 9 pm

 

 

#storefrontseries     #salonseries     #urbandataoperations     @storefrontnyc

 

With Geoff Manaugh and Nicholas de Monchaux

 

As the contemporary city is increasingly and massively quantified, visualized, and analyzed, untapped territories are revealed. Data visualization makes tangible urban spaces that may previously have been latent, challenging existing strategies of urban design and planning.


Two days before the inauguration of a president who has promoted his own role as a master rebuilder, Storefront’s Salon Series: Urban Data Operations brought together key thinkers and practitioners for an informal discussion around the agency of data driven micro-interventions in the development and understanding of the city.


The event presented Nicholas de Monchaux’s latest publication, Local Code: 3,659 Proposals About Data, Design, and the Nature of Cities, a compendium of designs for networked micro-interventions in American cities. The book served as a point of departure for a conversation about whether systems of information and infrastructure can serve those beyond their builders—or even how they can be built by those that they serve.

 

About the Book:

Local Code: 3,659 Proposals About Data, Design, & The Nature of Cities (Princeton Architectural Press) presents a collection of data-driven tools and design prototypes for understanding and transforming the physical, social, and ecological resilience of cities. Written by Nicholas de Monchaux, associate professor of architecture and urban design at UC Berkeley, the book arranges drawings of 3,659 digitally tailored interventions for vacant land in San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York City, and Venice, Italy. Critical essays offer essential links between these innovative design experiments and the seminal works of the urbanist Jane Jacobs, the artist Gordon Matta-Clark, and the digital mapping pioneer Howard Fisher, as well as the developing science of urban networks and complexity. Designed in collaboration with the Dutch information-design studio Catalogtree, and featuring a foreword by Keller Easterling, the book combines many thousands of drawings, images, and critical and historical texts into a complex and timely manifesto for 21st-century infrastructure and urbanism.

 

About the Salon Series:

Storefront’s Salon Series is a informal gathering at Storefront’s gallery space promoting dialogue connecting art and architecture to a series of contemporary issues. Each of these events are free and open to the public. Seating is available on a first come, first served basis, and members of Storefront can RSVP to reserve a seat. If you would like to become a member, please see here. To reserve your seat please contact us.

 

 

About the Participants

 

Geoff Manaugh:

Geoff Manaugh is author of A Burglar’s Guide to the City, about the relationship between crime and architectural design, as well as the long-running website BLDGBLOG. Manaugh is also the editor of Landscape Futures: Instruments, Devices and Architectural Inventions. Previously, he was senior editor of Dwell and a contributing editor at Wired UK, as well as director of Studio-X NYC, an urban think tank and event space at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation.

 

Nicholas de Monchaux:

Nicholas de Monchaux is associate professor of Architecture and Urban Design at UC Berkeley, where he is director of the Berkeley Center for New Media, and is a fellow of the American Academy in Rome. He is a partner in the Oakland-based architecture practice ModeM / Moll de Monchaux. De Monchaux’s first book, Spacesuit: Fashioning Apollo (MIT Press, 2011), was named a best book of the year on numerous design and technology lists. His design work has been exhibited internationally, at venues including SFMOMA, the MCA Chicago, the Venice Architecture Biennale, and the Lisbon Architecture Triennial.

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

   

Fast Buildings

GIF-invite-FXFOWLE-post

Fast Buildings

Tuesday, December 6th, 2016 – Tuesday, January 24th, 2017

FXFOWLE

22 West 19th St, 11th Floor, New York

 

#fastbuildings    #drawingseries

 

Fast Buildings was a selection of drawings from works produced as part of an ongoing initiative by Storefront for Art and Architecture to examine methods of architectural representation. The show brought together works by architects from past exhibitions, including Aesthetics / Anesthetics (2012), POP: Protocols Obsessions Positions (2013), Measure (2015), and Sharing Models (2016).

 

Each iteration of Storefront’s Drawing Series invites selected participants to consider Storefront for Art and Architecture’s gallery space (A/A, POP, and Measure) or the island of Manhattan (Sharing Models) as a site to explore and reflect upon a specific topic through the medium of drawing. In each iteration, architects interrogate the architectural drawing as a method and means by which notions of representation and production could be understood—from aesthetic clichés to disciplinary obsessions to data visualizations—in order to present a new architectural idea.

 

These drawings were presented as a pop-up show at FXFOWLE’s gallery and were available for sale. All proceeds from the sale of these works supported Storefront’s ongoing programming. To inquire about acquisitions, please contact ae@storefrontnews.org.

 

The FXFOWLE gallery is open to the public Monday through Friday, 9 am to 5 pm. Read more about the Fast Buildings works in the gallery guide above.

 

Drawing Series Participants:

Anna Neimark + Andrew Atwood

Bureau V

Odile Decq

DUS Architects

Ahmed ElHusseiny (KPF)

FleaFollyArchitects

Michelle Fornabai

Höweler + Yoon

Rutger Huiberts

Ania Jaworska

Bernard Khoury

Lateral Office (Mason White + Lola Sheppard)

Leong Leong

m-a-u-s-e-r (Mona Mahall + Asli Serbest)

Manuel Hertz Architects

Michele Marchetti (San Rocco Magazine)

Alex Maymind

MILLIØNS

MODU

nARCHITECTS

ODA

P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S (Georgina Huljich + Marcelo Spina)

Pedro & Juana

pneumastudio (Cathrym Dwyre + Chris Perry)

James Ramsey

RICA (Iñaqui Carnicero + Lorena Del Río)

Mark Robbins

Selldorf Architects

SITU Studio

David Sperling

T+E+A+M

The Open Workshop

Anthony Titus

Urban-Think Tank

Gia Wolff

 

Special Works:

Richard Barnes

Liam Gillick

Steven Holl

Alfredo Jarr

Ania Jaworska

Shirin Neshat

Jan Staller

Janina Tschäpe

Yvonne Venegas