Letters to the Mayor: Prague

Letters to the Mayor: Prague

April 23rd, 2018 – May 30th, 2018 

Norma Space

 

#letterstothemayor     #letterstothemayorprague     @storefrontnyc

 

Storefront presents Letters to the Mayor: Prague as part of the global project Letters to the Mayor in collaboration with Norma Space. Each iteration presents a collection of letters by more than 100 architects, addressing the most pressing issues facing their city.

 

Letters to the Mayor: Prague invites architects to write to the Mayor Adriana Krnáčová.

 

Participants

Václav Aulický, Afarch (Jan Aulík and Petra Skalická), Ricardo Bofill, Alžběta Brůhová, Robust (Ondřej, Helena Busta and Robert Damec), Objektor (Jakub Červenka and Václav Šuba), Chybík + Krištof (Ondřej Chybík, Michal Krištof and Robert Jelínek), Matyáš Cígler, Tomáš Ctibor with M.Š., Olga, Petr, Věra, Jana, Vojta, Jana, Pavel, Hanalisa, Klára, T. ,Michal, Robert, z and TC, René Dlesk, Kimberly Elman Zarecor, Jakub Hoffmann, Veronika Indrová, Ondřej Janků, Jan Jehlík, Karolína Jirkalová, Jan Kasl, Josef Kocián, David with Dominika and Jonáš Krausovi, Vladislav Kulhánek, Regina Loukotová, Karel Maier, MAAT (Mária Maninová, Andrea Trembuľaková and Magdalena Ježková), Miroslav Masák, Prokop Matěj, Pavla Melková, Dan Merta, Ondřej Michálek, Lenka Míková, Viktória Mravčáková, Onoff (Anika Juliane Neubauer and Berk Asal), Osamu Okamura, Pallanio k. s. v. r., Steeve Ray, Szymon Rozwałka, Ondřej Rys, Milota Sidorová, Eliška Slámová, Tamara Staňková with Matyáš Švejdík, Stanislav Pech and Magdaléna Uhlířová, Marc Subirana, Anna Švehlíková, Mahulena Svobodová, Ondřej Teplý, Štěpán Valouch, Imrich Vaško, Yvette Vasourková, Karolína Vojáčková, Jaroslav Wertig, Zdeněk Zavřel, Markéta Zdebská

 

 

PROJECT TEAM

 

Local Curators

Kateřina Kulanová and Jana Moravcová

 

Exhibition Design and Mayoral Desk

Jan Boháč

 

Wallpaper Design

Jan Boháč

 

 

ABOUT LETTERS TO THE MAYOR

 

Letters to the Mayor is an itinerant exhibition that displays real letters written by architects to their city mayors. Initiated by Storefront for Art and Architecture in 2014, the project has traveled to more than 18 cities across the globe, including Bogota, Mexico City, Athens, Panama City, Taipei, Mariupol, Madrid, Lisbon, and Buenos Aires, among others. 

 

Letters to the Mayor invites 100 architects in each city to write a letter to their mayor as a means of bringing innovative ideas and visions of the city closer to the decision-makers, and vice versa.

 

Throughout history, architects have engaged with this responsibility and the structures of economic, political, and cultural power in different ways and with varying degrees of success. With the rise of globalization and the homogenization of the contemporary city, the role of the architect in the political arena has often been relegated to answering questions that others have asked. 

 

Letters to the Mayor questions this dynamic, and invites local and global architects to deliver their thoughts directly to the desks of elected officials, and simultaneously into the public consciousness.

 

Closing Event: The Big Discussion

Closing Event: The Big Discussion

Marking the Closing of Sex and the So-Called City

Saturday, March 31, 2018

1 pm – 6 pm

97 Kenmare Street

 

#salonseries   #sexandthesocalledcity   #thebigdiscussion   #storefrontseries   @storefrontnyc

 

With Michael Bullock, Cristóbal CorreaColin CurleyJake JaxsonLydia KallipolitiMatthew Alexander RansomVera Scroggins, and Louise Story

 

Moderated by Andrés Jaque, Office for Political Innovation

 

On the closing day of Sex and the So-Called City, Storefront presents THE BIG DISCUSSION, a deliberation over the two-decade urban legacy of HBO’s Sex and the City and the ways in which it heralded and prescribed the evolution of New York City. Responding to the show’s episodic urban scenarios, the day-long summit convenes experts and activists to share overlapping stories of how LLC shell companies, waste management procedures, gay porn, and mineral rights efforts reshaped the city.

 

The event, curated and hosted by Andrés Jaque and the Office for Political Innovation, invites the public to promiscuously engage with speakers in order to mobilize alternative narratives of sex, capital, real-estate, bodies, natural resources, and ecosystems, and the ways that these elements assemble and interact with each other in New York City’s transurban expansion.

 

Schedule

1:00 pm: Andrés Jaque, Office for Political Innovation – Sex and the So-Called City

1:15 pm: Cristobal Correa, BuroHappold Engineering – NY infrastructures

1:45 pm: Colin P Curley. LA+ – Redistributing Waste

2:15 pm: Lydia Kallipoliti, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute – Shit and the City

2:45 pm: Louise Story, Independent Writer –Secrecy and Real Estate

3:15 pm: Matthew Alexander Ransom, Columbia University – Making Minerals Visible

3:45 pm: Vera Scroggins, Citizens for Clean Water – Activism against Fracking

4:15 pm: Michael Bullock, Pin-Up Magazine – Sex Urbanism

4:45 pm: Jake Jaxson, CockyBoys. – Making Sex Visible

5:15 pm: Andrés Jaque, Office for Political Innovation – Conclusions

5:30 pm: Reception

6:00 pm: Finish

 

ABOUT THE PARTICIPANTS

 

Michael J. Bullock is a writer, journalist and publisher that lives in Bedford–Stuyvesant, Brooklyn.   He started his career in publishing at the grandfather of the modern independent magazine index (from 2000-2004) and went on to set up BUTT (the revolutionary dutch homosexual magazine) in America, becoming it’s US publisher (2003 – 2011). Currently he is the American features editor for the contemporary interiors magazine Apartamento, a regular contributor to the architecture and design title PIN–UP, and works on the publishing side of Fantastic Man, The Gentlewoman, and PIN–UP .  In addition he is on the board of directors of Downtown for Democracy a political action committee that he co-founded in 2003 that uses the talent and skill of the creative community to raise money and develop communication materials for progressive candidates. In 2013, Karma published his novella Roman Catholic Jacuzzi.

Instagram: @michaeljbullock

 

Cristobal Correa moved to New York in 1998 and helped found BuroHappold’s New York office. In his 30 year engineering career Cristobal has designed tension structures, facades, art installations, long span structures, and temporary buildings as well as more traditional buildings of concrete and steel. He enjoys working collaboratively with architects and exploring with them the ever-changing challenges of building!

 

 

Years ago, Cristobal was seduced by a master planning exercise and so began his life-long love of cities and their infrastructure.  He currently serves on the board of Open House New York and is the Director of Technology at the Graduate Architecture and Urban Design School at Pratt Institute where he teaches.  He enjoys living in New York City!

 

Colin Curley is a landscape and architectural designer at James Corner Field Operations, and a researcher and production coordinator for LA+ Interdisciplinary Journal of Landscape Architecture. His design research explores the alternative aesthetic and experiential potential of hyper-toxic, denatured landscapes, while operating within the broad spectrum of their social, political, regulatory, and ecological complexities. Colin holds a Master of Landscape Architecture and Master of Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania School of Design, where he was named a University Olmsted Scholar and awarded the Ian L. McHarg Prize, and a Bachelor of Science in Architecture from the University of Virginia.

Instagram: @see_p_see, @laplusjournal

Facebook: /LAPlusJournal

Twitter: @laplusjournal

 

Lydia Kallipoliti is an architect, engineer and scholar. She is an Assistant Professor of Architecture and Director of the Geofutures M.S. Architecture Program at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and Professor and Senior Research Associate at the Center for Architecture, Science and Ecology (CASE) in New York.

 

Prior to her current position at RPI, Kallipoliti taught at Columbia GSAPP, the Cooper Union, Pratt Institute, and Syracuse University. She holds a Diploma in Architecture and Engineering from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece, a SMArchS in building technology from MIT and a PhD in history and theory of architecture from Princeton University. Her research focuses on the intersections of architecture, technology, and environmental politics and more particularly on recycling material experiments, theories of waste and reuse, as well as closed and self-reliant systems and urban environments. She is the author of Closed Worlds, Or, What is the Power of Shit for which she has received the ACSA award for Creative Achievement. She is also the founder of EcoRedux, an innovative online research platform, and ANAcycle thinktank, a design, research and writing practice based in Brooklyn, NY.

 

 

Jake Jaxson is the CEO of CockyBoys, a New York based gay adult entertainment company. Jaxson has produced numerous award-winning documentaries, TV shows, and independent films, highlighted by an Emmy Award for TRIBEtv. Jaxson’s work is dedicated to the healthy and creative exploration of gay sex! His life and work have been featured in New York Magazine, The Village Voice, OUT, Cosmopolitan, Elle, DNA, Salon, Paper, and Huffington Post.

Instagram: @JakeJaxson

Facebook: /JakeJaxson

Twitter: @cockyboys

 

Matthew Ransom is an architect and researcher based in New York City. His work is largely focused on uncovering the many ways in which architecture manifests itself, and in the politics of representation. This interest has led to work with organizations such as Alphabet’s Sidewalk Labs and the Columbia University GSAPP Incubator at the New Museum, where his research with A-Frame, a collective practice formed in the studios at Columbia, uses natural language processing to parse the ways architecture is communicated. He has worked both in New York and Paris, and is currently the design director of Overhead, an architecture office founded in 2018.

Instagram: @matthewransom

 

Vera Scroggins

I am presently 67 years old and retired from Nurses’ Aide Work and am a mother of three, adult children and grandmother of two. I moved to rural, Susquehanna County, Pa., in 1991 from Long Island, NY, Nassau County and living here now for 27 years. I came to escape pollution and industrial development and wanted a rural area, low traffic, clean air and clean water. Seventeen years later in 2008, I was shown a gas-drilling rig on a farm near me in my county and was shocked and dismayed and decided to document all I could of this and learn all I could about it. I’ve been documenting with videos on my youtube channel under my name of Vera Scroggins and have about 800 videos showing what I experienced and viewed in my county and elsewhere; I’ve given many testimonies to groups and to government agencies to show the risks, impacts, harms to my county of having gas development industrialization next to homes, schools, and on farms. I also started giving Citizen Gas Tours to show all this to interested parties who contacted me since 2009 and have given hundreds of Tours to people from all over USA and from five continents. We have seven or more gas companies in my county developing, besides pipeline companies and gas compressor station companies.  In 2013, Cabot Oil and Gas took me to Court to allege repeated trespassing on their leased properties and asked for and received an Injunction to keep me away from their sites and lease roads. I am now under a Permanent Injunction and must stay 100’ from their developed sites, 25’ from their leased roads which are off public roads, and park 100’ away from their leased road entrances or be charged with contempt of court. Since Injunction, I’ve been charged with contempt and received fine of 1,000 and am presently in court for contempt again this year and also criminal trespass charges and disorderly conduct charges. I deny intentionally trespassing or any disorderly conduct. I’ve had several civil rights attorneys represent me along the way and now I’m on my own and pro se and representing myself. Cabot Oil and Gas is able to exaggerate trespass charges to keep me away and hinder me in my documenting. I was able to go on Cabot sites for 5 years before they decided to pursue an Injunction and now criminal charges. Gas Workers also have lied to the Court about what they see and claim I have done. I still document, videotape, speak out, and give Citizen Gas Tours to show how the Gas Industry has taken over our Country; in my county in Pa., we now have almost 1500 gas wells, over 50 Gas Compressor Stations, hundreds of miles of new, high-pressure, gas pipelines, gas power plants, and waste treatment plant and waste ponds and other parts of this needed infrastructure. There is air pollution from all this, noise pollution, light pollution, water pollution, industrial traffic pollution.

 

Louise Story

Louise Story, an award winning journalist who spent 12 years at The New York Times. Louise is known for her hard-hitting investigations into international fraud and money laundering. She was a lead reporter on the financial crisis and her recent project on dirty money in real estate led to federal regulatory reform, the DOJ’s largest kleptocracy case ever and to greater public interest in secretive shell companies.

Twitter: @louisestory

 

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

 

Office for Political Innovation

The Office for Political Innovation, a Madrid/New York based practice directed by Andrés Jaque, develops architectural projects that bring inclusivity into daily life. All of the practice’s architectures can be seen as durable assemblages of the diversity that comprises ordinary life.

 

The practice received the Frederick Kiesler Prize for Architecture and the Arts in 2016 and the Silver Lion at the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale, and has designed award-winning projects such as Plasencia Clergy House (Dionisio Hernández Gil Prize), House in Never Never Land (Mies van der Rohe European Award Finalist), Tupper Home (X Bienal Española de Arquitectura y Urbanismo), and Escaravox (COAM Award 2013). In 2015, Andrés Jaque was the winner of MoMA PS1’s Young Architect Program, with the project Cosmo.

 

The Office for Political Innovation’s work has instigated crucial debates for contemporary architecture. In 2012, the Museum of Modern Art of New York (MoMA) acquired the project IKEA Disobedients as the first architectural performance to be part of its collection. In 2013, the practice presented Superpowers of Ten at the Lisbon Architecture Triennale, Different Kinds of Water Pouring into a Swimming Pool at RED CAT / CalArts Center for Contemporary Arts in Los Angeles, and Hänsel & Gretel’s Arenas at La Casa Encendida in Madrid. In 2012, the practice unblackboxed Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion with the intervention PHANTOM: Mies as Rendered Society. In 2011, the research and prototype-making project Sweet Parliament Home was presented at the Gwangju Biennale, and in 2010, the installation Fray Home Home was displayed at the 2010 Venice Architecture Biennial.

 

The Office for Political Innovation is the author of the publications PHANTOM: Mies as Rendered Society, Different Kinds of Water Pouring into a Swimming Pool, Dulces Arenas Cotidianas, and Eco-Ordinary: Codes for Everyday Architectural Practices and Everyday Politics. Their work has been published in many key media outlets, including A+U, Domus, El Croquis, the New York Times, and Vogue, among others.

 

Miguel de Guzmán / Imagen Subliminal

Imagen Subliminal Architectural Photography + Film was founded by architect and architectural photographer Miguel de Guzmán. The firm, comprised of Miguel de Guzman and Rocío Romero, is a New York and Madrid-based practice whose work is commissioned by many internationally renowned architecture, construction, and real estate firms.

 

Imagen Subliminal’s photographs have been published worldwide in print magazines such as Architect, Dwell, El Croquis, Arquitectura Viva, A+U Japan, Domus, Casabella, Mark, C3, and many other books and newspapers. The practice also  collaborates with online media as Archdaily, Dezeen, Designboom, and Divisare.

 

Imagen Subliminal’s film work has been displayed at MAXXI Rome, Centre Pompidou Paris, and architecture film festivals in New York, Los Angeles, Budapest, Santiago, and Seoul.

Sex and the So-Called City

 

 

SEX AND THE SO-CALLED CITY

 

Andrés Jaque / Office For Political Innovation in collaboration with Miguel de Guzmán / Imagen Subliminal

 

February 2nd – March 31st, 2018

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

February 1st Exhibition Opening:

Press and Members Preview: 6 pm – 7 pm

Public Opening: 7 pm – 9 pm

 

March 31st Closing Event

Salon Series: The Big Discussion

Moderated by Andrés Jaque

 

#sexandthesocalledcity   @storefrontnyc    @andres_jaque     @imagensubliminal

 

What are the social, environmental, and political consequences of our urban lifestyles?

 

This year, Sex and the City, New York City’s most influential archisocial manifesto, turns twenty. The series, an often prescient telling of the cultural trends that have played out in the two decades since its release, follows the glitz and un-glamour of its four main characters through a tumultuous period of transformation for our beloved city: the late 1990s and early 2000s.

 

For Sex and the So-Called CityAndrés Jaque / Office for Political Innovation in collaboration with Miguel de Guzmán / Imagen Subliminal, make use of lifestyle forensics to unveil and present the underlying themes of Sex and the City, unblackboxing New York City’s obvious (and therefore invisible) blueprints. These investigations collectively offer a groundbreaking – and sometimes shocking – understanding of the outcomes and impacts of contemporary urban life.

 

The exhibition dives deeply into issues such as real estate development, energy generation, reproduction, the hypercapitalization of society, and of course, sex, opening up conversations about the relationship of these issues to design, architecture, and the production of the city. In a time when our experiences and our surroundings are highly designed, what does New York City, the ultimate capital of choice, offer us? How many degrees of separation from questionable ethical practices do we feel comfortable with? How has the contemporary image of the city created new forms of design thinking and practice?

 

This forensic study of the city’s contemporary culture is presented in the form of a transmedia studio with 360-degree videos capturing interior and exterior landscapes that play host to the narratives and issues the series explores. Alongside the media room is an installation of evidentiary objects comprising the complex network of materiality that occupies and animates our urban context. A public program with two major events will utilize the space and the items to stage and film four new episodes on particular themes, capturing the objects, bodies, and actions of our lived experiences in the city.

 

Allowing for sometimes uncomfortable reflections about the consequences of our choices and designs, Sex and the So-Called City portrays snapshots of a new urban lifestyle, provoking us to contemplate the depths beneath the images that inundate our fictional – and real – imaginary of New York City.

 

ABOUT THE EPISODES:

The exhibition will present two public events, a series of presentations and conversations from experts in different fields that further expand upon the seminal urban themes of the series. These include:

 

Saturday, March 31st: Marathon of Scales and Marathon of Sections

 

Marathon of Scales will look at the way Columbus Circle became the location where International Fertilization, as a transurban way to simultaneously redesign the biology, the image and the political status of new humans was invented. Starting from the scale of the the spermatozoon, the session will explore the participation of interior, building, urban, territorial and environmental design in this invention and the political implications this process comprises. In this process, the marathon will make emphasis in the way New York apartments have become the ultimate location of sexual desire, the communication techniques used to sexualize them as a commercial and branding tool, but also the way they have become the default scenario for porn and the way they attract hookup apps users.

 

Marathon of Sections will connect the project of purifying New York air and waters (and the relocation of NY’s toxicity) with the project of rebranding the city as a location for billionaires. It will also interrogate the development of high-end residential condominium towers in NY, the narrative that supported that development and the NY’s evolution from the 2000s as the result of an accumulation of transformations in the way to construct collective ways to perceive and produce images. The development of specific forms of windows (helicopter views), surveillance, tracking mapping and monitoring. From the skies to the underground, the marathon will deal with a great variety of innovations that transformed NY, New Yorkers, its territorial dimension and the neighboring states underground mineral dimension.

 

——-

 

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

 

Office for Political Innovation

The Office for Political Innovation, a Madrid/New York based practice directed by Andrés Jaque, develops architectural projects that bring inclusivity into daily life. All of the practice’s architectures can be seen as durable assemblages of the diversity that comprises ordinary life.

 

The practice received the Frederick Kiesler Prize for Architecture and the Arts in 2016 and the Silver Lion at the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale, and has designed award-winning projects such as Plasencia Clergy House (Dionisio Hernández Gil Prize), House in Never Never Land (Mies van der Rohe European Award Finalist), Tupper Home (X Bienal Española de Arquitectura y Urbanismo), and Escaravox (COAM Award 2013). In 2015, Andrés Jaque was the winner of MoMA PS1’s Young Architect Program, with the project Cosmo.

 

The Office for Political Innovation’s work has instigated crucial debates for contemporary architecture. In 2012, the Museum of Modern Art of New York (MoMA) acquired the project IKEA Disobedients as the first architectural performance to be part of its collection. In 2013, the practice presented Superpowers of Ten at the Lisbon Architecture Triennale, Different Kinds of Water Pouring into a Swimming Pool at RED CAT / CalArts Center for Contemporary Arts in Los Angeles, and Hänsel & Gretel’s Arenas at La Casa Encendida in Madrid. In 2012, the practice unblackboxed Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion with the intervention PHANTOM: Mies as Rendered Society. In 2011, the research and prototype-making project Sweet Parliament Home was presented at the Gwangju Biennale, and in 2010, the installation Fray Home Home was displayed at the 2010 Venice Architecture Biennial.

 

The Office for Political Innovation is the author of the publications PHANTOM: Mies as Rendered Society, Different Kinds of Water Pouring into a Swimming Pool, Dulces Arenas Cotidianas, and Eco-Ordinary: Codes for Everyday Architectural Practices and Everyday Politics. Their work has been published in many key media outlets, including A+U, Domus, El Croquis, the New York Times, and Vogue, among others. 

 

Miguel de Guzmán / Imagen Subliminal

Imagen Subliminal Architectural Photography + Film was founded by architect and architectural photographer Miguel de Guzmán. The firm, comprised of Miguel de Guzman and Rocío Romero, is a New York and Madrid-based practice whose work is commissioned by many internationally renowned architecture, construction, and real estate firms.

 

Imagen Subliminal’s photographs have been published worldwide in print magazines such as Architect, Dwell, El Croquis, Arquitectura Viva, A+U Japan, Domus, Casabella, Mark, C3, and many other books and newspapers. The practice also  collaborates with online media as Archdaily, Dezeen, Designboom, and Divisare.

 

Imagen Subliminal’s film work has been displayed at MAXXI Rome, Centre Pompidou Paris, and architecture film festivals in New York, Los Angeles, Budapest, Santiago, and Seoul.

 

Exhibition Team

Research: Andrés Jaque, Paola Pardo

Fact Checking: Paola Pardo

Object Collection: Paola Pardo, Roberto González

Coordination: Roberto González

Design: Laura Mora, Felipe Arango, Ayushi Drolia, Roberto García, Marta Jarabo, Pablo Maldonado, Solé Mallol, Valentina Marín

Cinematography and Video Installation: Miguel de Guzmán / Imagen Subliminal

Music Art: Emiliano Caballero

Video Art (Episodes): Óscar Espín

Voice Overs: Elizabeth Sanjuan

Sound Editing: Robin Groove

Text Editing: Walter Ancarrow

Video Projection System and Installation: Integrated Visions

Fabrication and Installation: Asa Pingree

 

Storefront Team

Executive Director and Chief Curator: Eva Franch

Associate Curator: Carlos Mínguez Carrasco

Director of Strategic Development: Jinny Khanduja

Programs Producer: Max Lauter

 

SUPPORT

Pro-bono support for this exhibition is kindly provided by Integrated Visions.

 

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

OfficeUS Manual at the Center for Architecture

 

OfficeUS Manual

Center for Architecture

536 Laguardia Place

Tuesday, January 16th, 2018

6 – 8 pm

Tickets ($10 public; $5 for members of Storefront)

 

#officeus   #officeusmanual   @storefrontnyc

 

With introductions from:

Eva Franch I Gilabert, Carlos Mínguez Carrasco, Ana Miljački, Jacob Reidel, and Ashley Schafer (OfficeUS Manual editors)

 

With presentations by:

Amie SiegelMichael YoungCharles RenfroIan VolnerPierce ReynoldsonLandon Brown, Liam GillickDaniel PittmanPhu HoangSean Anderson, and Matthew Clarke (OfficeUS Manual contributors)

 

OfficeUS Manual (Lars Müller Publishers, 2017) is a critical, occasionally humorous, and sometimes stupefying guide to the architectural workplace. The third publication of OfficeUS, a project developed and commissioned by Storefront for Art and Architecture for the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale, the book presents office policies and guidelines spanning the last 100 years alongside commissioned statements by contemporary contributors, original graphic analysis, and images from The Architects by Amie Siegel. The OfficeUS Manual is a resource for understanding—and reimagining—the nature and design of architectural practice. At this book talk, OfficeUS editors and contributors will interrogate the protocols, policies, and procedures of the architectural workplace.

 

Winners – Souvenirs: New New York Icons

 
#souvenirs   #newnewyorkicons   #modelshow   @storefrontnyc
 
Souvenirs: New New York Icons, the second iteration of Storefront’s model show, commissioned 59+ objects that redefine New York’s iconic imagery. Inspired by each of the city’s Community Districts, more than 59 artists, architects, and designers reimagined the referential images that constitute the global perception of the city, proposing new understandings of the urban experience.
 
Members of the public for the models that best represent new visions and values of the city. See below for the names and descriptions of the winning souvenirs, which will be presented to the Mayor Bill de Blasio as new icons for New York City. Members of the public can also order a miniature version of each souvenir to take home at cost price.
   
Manhattan Community District #2:
Pop-Up City by Kwong Von Glinow Design Office

Souvenirs: great at recalling the singular, not so great with multitudes.Manhattan’s second Community Board, stretching from Chinatown to Gansevoort Market by way of Noho, Soho, and Greenwich Village, is a cultural salad. What constitutes a souvenir for one of the richest and most diverse set of cultural histories in New York City?
 
Eschewing the readily iconic, we take a look into just how one remembers CB-2’s eclectic array of neighborhoods: streetscapes awash in romantic hues of dusk and dawn, the silhouette of their rooftops, and the intersections where these cultures converge.
 
A souvenir that captures such richness cannot assume a singular form. Pop-Up City embraces multiplicity with sixteen intersecting streetscapes that collapse and expand the souvenir from flat visage to a city-in-miniature. Like a pop-up children’s book, the souvenir of the city begins as folded upon itself, with Greenwich Village pressed flatly against Little Italy, and Soho finding itself next to the West Village. As the souvenir unfolds, the intersection of each streetscape acts as an urban hinge; neighborhoods collide as the full view of the street comes to life. The angles that the intersections pass through are reminiscent of the negotiating grid system of the area, holding traces of Manhattan’s early grid system relative to the Hudson River and the 1811 grid that trickles down from Central Park. Unfolded, the city is restored, its streetscapes washed in the pinkish orange of the rising sun, presenting more than a memory of what it looks like, but rather how the city is experienced.
 
As to what is it for? For that existential crisis afflicting all souvenirs, there are just as many answers as the Pop-Up City has facades. We suggest a pencil holder, but that is by no means the sole function that one could find!    
 
______    
  
Brooklyn Community District #2:
Un-Sheduled by Al-Hamad Design
There is nothing new under the old sun. Although things do come and go, what makes those things do not. New York’s sidewalk shed is so highly defined in its physical construction and in its symbolism to the piece of land it defiantly stands in front of. It laps up the notion that it is literally supporting proof of current change; a figure of progress and metamorphosis. New York has always adapted, imagined, and followed through; it thrives on this rapid strife for evolution, for non-stagnation. New York is thrilled by rapid movement. It can’t stop swimming upstream, especially if it couldn’t.   
 
We fall in love with its constant disappointment because it is simultaneously a tremendous source of surprise. Aren’t we? Deeply in love with it.    
 
The sidewalk shed gives us no promise or certainty, but neither does New York. That is why we live through the discomfort of it all-discomfort motivates and pushes us. It makes us care. This simple shed brings out emotion like no other object in this great city can, and it is everywhere. Often an accidental shelter, it may be terrifying, or perhaps even annoying. Yet it is a sign of prospect; it is a human being trying her very hardest all on her own.
 
______
 
Brooklyn Community District #8:
The HotH: House of the Homeless by ZUS [Zones Urbaines Sensibles]
 
New York is represented through a large number of “souvenired” buildings that together shape the collective memory of the city. Most of these buildings are office towers. Very few contain housing, with the recent wave of slender luxury towers being a notable exception – those have actually turned into marketable icons even before being built.
 

Ironically not a single one of these souvenirs is affordable.

 

To genuinely represent New York, we must imagine the city beyond the obvious. We should visualize the unseen against a backdrop of the enlarging gap between rich and poor, manifested through the spreading of the luxury condominium, on the one hand, and the impoverished circumstances of many of the city’s inhabitants, on the other. Currently, more than 60,000 citizens don’t have a house to live in. Therefore, the next New York souvenir is a House for the Homeless: the HotH.

 

The City of New York should be able to provide shelter for all its inhabitants, and the HotH does exactly that. It is conceived of 60,000 apartments within a public infrastructure of 155 collective gardens. It offers a place for all those who are currently sleeping under bridges and in cardboard boxes. The HotH is brutally big, yet human and romantic.

 

This house is the ultimate understatement: it is a building that is far larger than New York’s largest. It shows a prosperous metropolis that is incapable of distributing its wealth fairly among its citizens.

 

The HotH is a metropolitan souvenir that does not simply highlight obvious architectural splendor, but instead marks an era where societies and cities are at the crossroads of either becoming territories of segregation or places of shared welfare.   

 

With the HotH, New York will choose to be the latter, adding the first truly affordable souvenir to its collective memory.
 

[upcoming] Listening Series: Playing Spaces

Jenny Chen performing under Domo at the Tippet Rise Art Center, 2016. 

Design by Ensamble Studio (Anton Garcia-Abril and Debora Mesa). Photograph by Iwan Baan.

 

THIS EVENT WAS POSTPONED DUE TO THE WEATHER – PLEASE CHECK BACK FOR UPDATES ON THE NEW DATE. 

 

In the meantime, you can listen to Attention Issue 4: “How Musicians Think About Space” upon its release on January 6th.

 

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Listening Series: Playing Spaces

Saturday, January 6th, 2018

3 – 5 pm

 

#listeningseries   #playingspaces   #storefrontseries   @storefrontnyc

 

With Argeo Ascani, Anne Guthrie, Zev Greenfield, Margaret Anne Schedel, Elaine Sisman, and Peter Zuspan

 

Moderated by Willem Boning and Curt Gambetta

 

Performance by Daniel Neumann

 

In architecture, spatial thinking is at the core of the design process. In music, however, space is often considered a surface effect, a veneer of “good” or “bad” acoustics that is applied to sound rather than grounding it. But music is inherently spatial. As it travels from a source to our ears, music is transformed by the air, the surrounding architecture, and the shape of our own bodies. A number of musicians from across time periods, genres, and traditions have acknowledged this gap, and have exploited spatial phenomena to enrich their musical languages.

 

Listening Series: Playing Spaces is presented in parallel with the launch of How Musicians Think About Space, an issue produced by architectural designer and acoustician Willem Boning for Attention-The Audio Journal for Architecture that documents musical experiments with the spatial dynamics of architecture and landscape. Through interviews, musical excerpts, and acoustical examples, How Musicians Think About Space illuminates the role of space in the imagination of composers, performers, and producers. 

 

In order to make the interaction of sound and space legible in new ways, this first iteration of Storefront’s Listening Series expands on topics from the journal issue, including the physical phenomena of sound, its reproduction and representation, and the design and occupation of acoustical environments. A performance by sound artist Daniel Neumann will set the stage for a panel discussion with historians, architects, musicians, and acousticians about how musicians engage space as a means for invention. Participants will introduce audio excerpts that capture and communicate a spatial phenomenon, followed by a group discussion on the spatial aspects of musical performance.

 

About the Performance

For Listening Series: Playing Spaces, Daniel Neumann will perform CHANNELS APPLIED #1, an original spatial sound work that responds to the environment of the event, applying the sonic “raw” material of CHANNELS, a concurrent installation at Fridman Gallery in NYC, to Storefront’s ground floor gallery space and basement. Neumann frequently uses given sonic material as a compositional strategy. In what he calls a “continual concrète practice,” Neumann stages multiple iterations of given material in different sites, systems, and situations, layering, staggering, cutting, and merging sonic traces and imprints. Inspired by the Musique Concrète movement, he proposes that musical composition begins with concrete sounds instead of an abstract idea. But, in contrast to the fixed media compositions of Musique Concrète, Neumann’s pieces do not result in a finished, hermetic work. Rather, each iteration is responsive to its concrete surroundings and different speaker types and systems. The altered sonic material is subsequently re-applied to new listening situations. In this way, Neumann’s performances are temporary concretions that weave different spatio-temporal fragments and layers together.

 

About the Listening Series

Storefront’s newest event format, the Listening Series, invites close listening and reflection on aural histories, practices, and imaginaries from the real to the virtual. To make the interaction of sound and space legible in new ways, the format examines the ways sound is experienced, how it interacts with the hegemonies of visual media, and the ways in which it mediates perception across physical and psychological domains. To transform hearing into listening, the series invites the public to tune their ears to the performance of spaces, voices, instruments, and machines to capture, interpret, synthesize, produce, sonify, broadcast, and engage in feedback with information and environments.

 

About the Participants

Argeo Ascani first became interested in music with a childhood dream of playing the theme song to the Pink Panther. Since then, much has happened. As a performer, he traveled to many places, played many pieces, and worked with many people – sometimes even enjoying himself. He has taught in the Music History and Contemporary Performance Practice departments at the Manhattan School of Music and has given talks in over a dozen countries. Currently, Argeo can be found in the position of Curator, Music at EMPAC – the Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY. (oegra.com)

 

Willem Boning is an architectural and acoustical designer at Arup. He works at the intersection of architecture, sound simulation and virtual reality and has pioneered new tools for acoustical analysis, optimization and reverse-engineering. Willem led the design of the Tiara, an innovative outdoor music structure at the Tippet Rise Art Center, and has done acoustical design and consulting for clients including Steinway & Sons, the Frick Collection, the American Museum of Natural History, WeWork, Google and the Archdiocese of New York. Willem received his Masters of Architecture degree from Princeton University, and previously worked with Rem Koolhaas at the Office for Metropolitan Architecture in Rotterdam and Hong Kong. Willem has been invited to speak about his work at various institutions and conferences, including RWTH Aachen, Rice University, PUCP Lima and the IoA Auditorium Acoustics Conference, and he writes about music, acoustics and architecture on his blog, www.fromthesoundup.com.

 

Curt Gambetta is a scholar, architectural designer and editor of Attention audio journal, together with Joseph Bedford. He is a fourth year PhD student in the School of Architecture at Princeton University, and holds a Bachelor’s degree from Vassar College and a Master of Architecture from Rice University. Prior to his studies at Princeton, he was the Peter Reyner Banham Fellow at the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, a teaching fellow at Woodbury University School of Architecture in Los Angeles and a resident of the Sarai program of the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies in Delhi, India. His design and research practice has included a number of public installations, salons and curatorial residencies at Lawndale Art Center in Houston, CEPA Gallery in Buffalo and WUHO Gallery in LA, as well as ongoing research about the architecture and urbanism of waste infrastructure (http://assemblyoftrash.net/).

 

Zev Greenfield is a not-for-profit arts manager, curator and fundraiser with an MBA from Columbia Business School (’05) and over 15 years of progressive global experience across the not-for-profit and arts/entertainment industries. Zev is the Executive Director of the pioneering Brooklyn-based ISSUE Project Room and has a long-standing commitment to artists, devising new and inventive programming, plus coordinating critical operating and capital projects, such as the construction of The Orchestra of St.Luke’s DiMenna Center for Classical Music (New York’s first orchestral rehearsal and recording studio). Prior to ISSUE, Zev led the turnaround of the Byrd Hoffman Water Mill Foundation, worked with NY-based orchestras on the development of alternate revenue streams and has served a number of US and International arts organizations as a Strategic and Fundraising Consultant.

Anne Guthrie is an acoustician, composer, and French horn player living in Brooklyn, NY. She studied music composition and English at the University of Iowa and architectural acoustics at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, where she completed her Ph.D in 2014. She works as an acoustic consultant at Arup in New York City. Her music combines her knowledge of acoustics and contemporary composition/improvisation. While Guthrie’s electronic music focuses on exploiting the natural acoustic phenomena of unique architectural spaces through minimal processing of field recordings, her composition explores the orchestration of non-musical sounds, speech in particular. Guthrie’s French horn playing focuses on electronic processing and extended techniques used in improvisatory settings, as a soloist and with Fraufraulein and Delicate Sen, among others. Further, her acoustics research centers on the use of ambisonics for stage acoustics.

 

Daniel Neumann is a Brooklyn-based sound artist, organizer and audio engineer. He holds a master’s degree in media art from the Academy of Visual Art Leipzig and studied electronic music composition. Neumann’s practice engages hybrid installation-performance formats to explore how sound interacts with space and how spaces can be shaped by sound. He thinks of sound as an interdisciplinary field enabled by audio procedures. Neumann’s works have been presented at Pinacoteca Bellas Artes Universidad de Caldas, Loop Barcelona, MoMA PS1, Knockdown Center, Pratt Institute, Eyebeam, Sculpture Center and many other venues. As a curator, he runs an event series in NYC and Berlin (CT::SWaM) that engages in spatial sound works and focused listening. As a sound engineer, Neumann is the acoustic designer of The World Is Sound at the Rubin Museum and head engineer for Blank Forms, Alarm Will Sound, Diamanda Galás and David Guetta. In 2013-16, he was the head engineer for live events at MoMA PS1. See Daniel’s website http://danielneumann.org/ for samples of his work.

 

Margaret Anne Schedel is a composer and cellist specializing in the creation and performance of ferociously interactive media whose works have been performed throughout the United States and abroad. As an Associate Professor of Music at Stony Brook University she ran SUNY’s first Coursera Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), an introduction to computational arts. Schedel holds a certificate in Deep Listening and is a joint author of Cambridge Press’s Electronic Music.  Her research focuses on gesture in music, the sustainability of technology in art, and sonification/gamification of data. In her spare time she curates exhibitions focusing on the intersection of art, science, new media, and sound and runs www.arts.codes, a site celebrating art with computational underpinnings.

 

Elaine Sisman is the Anne Parsons Bender Professor of Music at Columbia University. Her numerous publications on Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven include the recent articles “Haydn’s Solar Poetics: The Tageszeiten Symphonies and Enlightenment Knowledge” in the Journal of the American Musicological Society and “Music and the Labyrinth of Melancholy” in the Oxford Handbook of Music and Disability Studies. She received the Ph.D. from Princeton University and has taught at the University of Michigan and Harvard University. A member of the Joseph Haydn-Institut (Cologne) and the Mozart-Akademie (Salzburg), she served a term as president of the American Musicological Society, which elected her to Honorary Membership (2011). In 2014 she was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

 

Peter Zuspan is a founding principal of the architecture and design studio Bureau V. Bureau V’s recently completed work, National Sawdust, a nonprofit incubator and performance space for new music in Brooklyn, New York, has been described by The New York Times as “the city’s most vital new-music hall,” and has won numerous awards, including Architectural Review’s Culture Award Commended, Architecture Record’s Top 10 Art Centers of the World in 2015, and was nominated for the Mies Crown Hall America’s Prize. In addition to his architectural work, Zuspan is a trained opera singer and musician and has performed in genre-spanning projects in numerous spaces, including Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, the Venice Biennale of Art, the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, the Gwangju Biennale, the Guggenheim Museum, and Brazil’s Inhotim. Zuspan currently sits as the Secretary of the Board of Directors of National Sawdust. He has taught architecture at Columbia University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Syracuse University. 

 

About Attention Audio Journal

Attention is an audio journal for architectural culture that uses the medium of sound and spoken word to capture a dimension of architecture otherwise lost in print. By precluding visual media, Attention strikes a distance between the distraction economy of much online media, creating an intimate and reflective space for the in-depth development of ideas and issues. Through interviews, roundtable debates, oral histories, field recordings, the exploration of archival recordings, experimental music and soundscapes, reportage and audio essays, Attention investigates issues of concern to contemporary architectural culture, theory and practice. Attention is edited by Joseph Bedford and Curt Gambetta, with assistance from production consultant Griffin Ofiesh.

 

Attention is a sister project of The Architecture Exchange www.thearchitectureexchange.com, a platform dedicated to fostering debate and exchange in architectural culture that was founded by Joseph Bedford and Jessica Reynolds. Since 2013, the Architecture Exchange has organized numerous public events and peer-to-peer workshops between architects, theorists and historians, as well as a book series with Bloomsbury Press.

 

Attention is available through its website www.attentionjournal.com, iTunes  https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/attention-audio-journal-for-architecture/id1103549975?mt=2= and other podcast applications such as Stitcher and Mixcloud.

 

About Attention Issue 4: How Musicians Think About Space

Produced by Willem Boning, featuring Jürgen Meyer, Elaine Sisman, Emily Thompson, John Harvith, Susan Edwards Harvith, John Culshaw, Glenn Gould, Paul Théberge, Yasuaki Shimizu, and Daniel Neumann.

Episode Summaries

 

1 – Introduction

The introductory audio essay illuminates four aspects of sound in physical space—location, size, reverberation and environmental noise—with examples of how composers from across the spectrum of Western art music exploited these phenomena in their music. Acoustician Jürgen Meyer and musicologist Elaine Sisman show how the classical composer Joseph Haydn used space to create musical effects beyond the boundaries of melody, harmony, rhythm and dynamics.

 

2 – The Sound of Absence

What is music like without the sound of a space? Historian Emily Thompson discusses the aesthetics, technology and politics of spatial absence at the dawn of the recording era while John and Susan Edwards Harvith explain how musicians coped with, adapted to and sometimes thrived in the acoustically dead confines of the recording studio.

 

3 – Even Better than the Real Thing

In the 1950s, classical record producers were fixated on realism, aspiring to put listeners in the ‘best seat of an acoustically perfect hall.’ Not so for John Culshaw, however, a maverick producer who used new stereophonic technology to produce operas that were more dramatic, more spatially immersive and (so he claimed) more faithful to a composer’s intentions. Sonic highlights from Culshaw’s producing career accompany a reading from his two memoirs, ‘Ring Resounding’ and ‘Putting the Record Straight.’

 

4 – The Acoustic Orchestrations

The pianist Glenn Gould was dogmatic about his recording setup, placing the microphone as close as possible to his piano to exclude the sound of the surrounding room. That is, until he encountered the music of Alexander Scriabin—Gould felt that no one acoustic could do justice to Scriabin’s mystical musical language, and devised a system of ‘sound cameras’ that could zoom into or zoom out of his piano. Gould’s ambitious ‘Acoustic Orchestrations’ experiment remained unfinished, however, until music professor Paul Théberge discovered it in an archive and brought the project to completion.

 

5 – Bach, Sax, Space

One day, while practicing the prelude to Bach’s Cello Suite #1, Yasuaki Shimizu accidentally ran his tenor saxophone through a reverb machine. The sound so moved him that he embarked on an odyssey to record each of the six Cello Suites in a different acoustical environment. In this piece, Shimizu takes us into a warehouse, a stone quarry, a mine, a concert hall, a Baroque villa and a Gothic palazzo, showing us how the unique acoustics of each site drew out the emotional nuances of each suite in Bach’s masterwork.

 

6 – Free Field/Pressure Field/Diffuse Field

Bad acoustics inspired Daniel Neumann to become a composer and sound artist. After struggling to tame echoes, flutter and too much reverberation as a sound engineer at a nightclub in Leipzig, Daniel embraced these and other acoustical peculiarities and made them the focus of his work. In this piece, Neumann talks about how he uses sound to raise awareness of the idiosyncratic sounds of architectural spaces and plays us an iteration of his piece, “Free Field, Diffuse Field, Pressure Field.”

 

 

Attendance and Seating

All Storefront events are free and open to the public. Seating is on a first come, first served basis, with priority seating available for members of Storefront. If you are a member and would like to reserve a seat, contact jk@storefrontnews.org.

 

To become a member, see here.

 

 

Support

Listening Series: Playing Spaces is supported by Arup.
 
Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

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In Recognition: Vito Acconci

20171213 Vito Acconci for FB-02

 

Throughout his life of visionary experimentation, Vito Acconci defied art, architecture, & all labels that society has produced. His boundary-defying work includes the facade of the building that Storefront has called home for the past 22 years.

 

Thank you, Vito.

 

From December 13th to 23rd, we invite you to pay homage to Vito Acconci. An installation designed by Acconci Studio on the walls of Storefront for Art and Architecture’s gallery space serves as a message board for friends and visitors.

 

From December 24th to January 3rd, the gallery space will remain lit, with windows along the facade offering views into this space of words that recognize Vito Acconci.

 

For the duration of the installation, visitors will also encounter a sound work, YOU ARE HERE (& there, too, etc), a 3 1/2 hour recording of a reading by Vito Acconci that narrates Storefront’s programmatic history in chronological order from 1982-2013. The piece was commissioned by Storefront for its 30th anniversary.

 

Manifesto Series: Souvenirs for an Ideal City

Manifesto Series: Souvenirs for an Ideal City

Tuesday, November 28th, 2017

7 – 9 pm

 

#storefrontseries   #manifestoseries   #souvenirs   @storefrontnyc

 

With Joep van Lieshout, Arjen Oosterman, QSPACE, and Marga Weimans.

 

As a contemporary form of commercialized nostalgia, souvenirs are the ultimate cliche in the representation of a city. Pocket-sized, acritical, and cheap, they populate tourist sites all over the world with a patina of innocence.

 

Souvenirs produce collective imaginaries made up of lines that follow the profiles of superlative sculptures, buildings, and stories. They have become the reference points that anchor a particular culture in time, representing (consciously or not) political, cultural, and social values.

 

Manifesto Series: Souvenirs for an Ideal City is organized as part of Storefront’s current exhibition, Souvenirs: New New York Icons. The event invites an international group of architects, designers, photographers, curators, and researchers to reflect upon the objects and imaginaries that define the global city. Participants will reimagine the icons of the city, and will present manifestos for new “souvenirs for an ideal city” in an effort to explore the concept of iconography and what icons mean for the city today.

 

 

About the Participants:

Joep van Lieshout is a sculptor and visionary known for exploring the boundaries of art, of ethics, of society. His work is not limited to sculptures and installations, but also comprises buildings and furniture, as well as utopian and dystopian visions. In his projects, Van Lieshout focuses on systems, power, autarky, life, sex and death – the human individual in the face of the greater whole. In 1995, Van Lieshout founded his studio, Atelier Van Lieshout; ever since, he has been working under the studio moniker to undermine the myth of the artistic genius.

 

Arjen Oosterman is a critic, educator and curator. With a background in architectural history he is editor-in-chief of Volume magazine (since 2007). For Volume’s publisher Archis, he is engaged in book publications and projects, the current one being Trust in the Blockchain Society. As an educator, he taught architectural history and later on specialized in research and writing at schools of architecture. He published first and foremost in Archis and Volume, but also in other magazines like l’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui, Baumeister, Rassegna, and Manifesto. He has written, edited, and contributed to books on contemporary Dutch architects and architecture, contributed to Dutch television documentaries, been member of juries and awards, and lectured internationally.

 

QSPACE is a queer architecture research and design studio that defines itself as mixing queer theory, social justice, and design practice. Beyond a collection of individuals, QSPACE is a platform for research projects by students and professionals working on queerness in the built environment, producing research and outputs on topics such as gender inclusive bathroom design, LGBTQ homelessness and housing, and queer histories in architecture. QSPACE pushes for organized action through exhibitions, publications, digital archiving, and design guidelines, making questions of gender and sexuality visible to a field that has traditionally subverted such questions. In the absence of a centralized voice, QSPACE is a hub for students, professionals, and academics to connect and collaborate. As architects, the studio believes that design can and should play an active role in responding to social change, and hopes to offer the tools with which to create it.

 

Marga Weimans is an international fashion house that expands itself to multiple disciplines including fashion, architecture, and fine arts. Weimans graduated from the Antwerp Royal Academy of Fine Arts. Her work has been purchased by and exhibited at the Groningen Museum, and her collections were presented in two haute couture weeks in Paris and in several Dutch exhibitions. Weimans pushes the boundaries of the industry, exploring the connections between fashion and architecture. Her collections are very broad: from haute couture to pret a porter, including architectural showpieces and minimalistic dresses. She incorporates elements of nature and space, and uses earth tones and natural fabrics. She works with 3D perspectives, and has used materials such as wood, iron, and resin as well as creating her own material by mixing fabric with fiberglass. Weimans is also interested in exploring the role of black women in our current global, complex culture. With her collection “Source of Power Collection,” Weimans puts forth an image of the eccentricity, political incorrectness, and dignity that come to play in analyzing the contemporary black woman.

 

About the Manifesto Series:

”To launch a manifesto you have to want: A, B & C, and fulminate against 1, 2 & 3. Work yourself up and sharpen your wings…” -Tristan Tzara, Dada Manifesto (1918)

 

The Manifesto Series is one of the Storefron’s ongoing event series formats. It seeks to encourage the formulation of positions and instigate spirited discussion and exchange in a dynamic and polemical context. The format therefore differs from that of other talks and presentations. Rather than putting forth a synthetic lecture or a series of projects, participants are invited to deliver a concise, point-by-point manifesto, with the hope that their positions will provide the grounds for discussion to test various hypotheses in real time.

 

 

Attendance and Seating

All Storefront events are free and open to the public. Seating is on a first come, first served basis, with priority seating available for members of Storefront. If you are a member and would like to reserve a seat, contact jk@storefrontnews.org.

 

To become a member, see here.

 

 

Support

This event is part of the Crossovers Program, a collaboration between Storefront and the Het Nieuwe Instituut. The program is supported as part of the Dutch Culture USA program by the Consulate General of the Netherlands in New York.

 

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

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OfficeUS Manual

 


$25.00

Lars Muller Publishers, 2017

16 × 24 cm, 6 ¼ × 9 ½ in

288 pages, 461 illustrations

Paperback

ISBN: 978-3-03778-439-6, English
 

Edited by Eva Franch, Ana Miljački, Carlos Mínguez Carrasco,

Jacob Reidel, and Ashley Schafer. 

 

OfficeUS Manual is a critical, occasionally humorous, and sometimes stupefying guide to the architectural workplace that documents and interrogates the protocols, policies, and procedures of architectural offices. The book is the third publication of the OfficeUS series, which deals with the influence of U.S. architectural practices on a global scale.

 

OfficeUS Manual contains historical material from large firms and small studios. Additionally, it features contemporary reflections by more than fifty architects, artists, and writers concerned with the needs and desires of professional architecture practices today. It analyzes the methods and practices of architectural firms, examining, in particular, the past one hundred years.

 

The book is a resource for understanding – and reimagining – the nature and design of an architectural practice. It features original graphic analysis and images from The Architects by Amie Siegel. The publication follows two other books in the series: OfficeUS Agenda, which documents the work of US architectural offices and their global influence over the past one hundred years; and OfficeUS Atlas, a register and press archive of US architectural production abroad.

 

OfficeUS is a project initiated by Storefront for Art and Architecture in 2014, when the organization was selected to serve as the commissioner of the U.S. Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale. Read more about the OfficeUS project here.

 

 

 

Salon Series: On the Politics of Performance

“Marching On: The Politics of Performance” by Bryony Roberts, Mabel O. Wilson, and the
Marching Cobras of New York. Commissioned by Storefront for Art and Architecture, 2017.

 

Salon Series: On the Politics of Performance

Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

7 – 9 pm

 

#salonseries   #marchingon   #politicsofperformance

 

With Bryony Roberts, Mabel O. Wilson, and Eva Franch

 

As part of Marching On: The Politics of Performance, Storefront collaborates with Performa to host a salon series at the gallery space exploring the politics of performance.

 

A corresponding performance by The Marching Cobras of New York is presented on the Saturday and Sunday before the event at Marcus Garvey Park in Harlem. The event is free and open to the public, and is part of Performa 17. See here for more information.

 

African-American marching bands have long been powerful agents of cultural and political expression, celebrating collective identities and asserting rights to public space and visibility. With Marching On, Bryony Roberts and Mabel O. Wilson, professors at Columbia University’s GSAPP, collaborate with the Marching Cobras of New York, a Harlem-based after-school drum line and dance team, to explore the legacy of marching and organized forms of performance. Commissioned by Storefront for Art and Architecture, this new project interweaves echoes of the 1917 Silent Parade against racial violence with references to the revered Harlem Hellfighters in order to celebrate the crucial role of the community’s collective performances as acts of both cultural expression and political resistance.