Updates Regarding COVID-19

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture will be temporarily closed beginning on March 13th, 2020. We are closely monitoring updates regarding COVID-19 from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the New York State Council on the Arts, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

In addition, all public programming initiated by Storefront is currently on hold, and our staff will be working remotely for the time being. We will not be accessible by phone, but email requests can be sent to info@storefrontnews.org.

 

We will post any future updates here. Thank you for helping us promote the safety of our staff, community, and the city at large.

Members Tours of Alien Property and Arabesque with Rayyane Tabet

Alien Property:

Monday, March 9th, 3:00 pm

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

1000 5th Ave, New York, NY

 

Arabesque:

Wednesday, March 11th, 3:30 pm

Storefront for Art and Architecture

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

[RSVP]  

 

#arabesque    #rayyanetabet     @storefrontnyc 

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture partners with The Metropolitan Museum of Art to host two exclusive members tours of our respective exhibitions featuring the work of artist Rayyane Tabet. Arabesque (on view at Storefront) and Alien Property (on view at The Met), both draw from Tabet’s research-oriented practice to explore issues of provenance, colonialism, appropriation, and context through personal stories that animate buildings, objects, and personal narratives.

 

These tours are open to members of Storefront for Art and Architecture. Current members, please RSVP below. To join our membership program in order to attend the tours, please email membership@storefrontnews.org.

 

Read more about Arabesque and about Alien Property.

 

RSVP for one or both of the tours here by Sunday, March 8th.

Notes on Arabesque: Rayyane Tabet at The Cooper Union

Tuesday, March 10th, 2020

7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

 

The Cooper Union Foundation Building

7 East 7th Street, Room 315

New York, NY

 

In collaboration with the IDS Public Lecture Series, organized by Leslie Hewitt and Omar Berrada

 

[RSVP

 

#sfevents     #rayyanetabet      @storefrontnyc     @thecooperunion

 

As part of the IDS Public Lecture Series at The Cooper Union, Storefront for Art and Architecture collaborates with The Cooper Union to present “Notes on Arabesque,” an event that draws upon the concepts that inform Rayyane Tabet’s current exhibition at Storefront’s gallery space.

 

About the Exhibition

In 2020, an improbable meeting takes place between a young American architect and an older French architectural historian over a century after they were both at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris.

 

Julia Morgan (1872-1957) was the institution’s first female architecture student, and went on to become a prolific representative of the American Arts and Crafts movement in her home state of California. At a time when Modernism was coming into favor, her design for the Hearst Castle at San Simeon was grand and complex, utilizing decorative elements and mixing many architectural styles.

 

Jules Bourgoin (1838-1908) was a Paris-born professor who spent much time traveling across the Middle East and North Africa. Bourgoin’s trips were intricately documented, and his keen interest in architectural detail and ornamentation was made visible through elaborate drawings that were incorporated into publications such as Les Arts Arabes (“The Arab Arts”) and Les Eléments de l’Art Arabe (“The Elements of Arab Art”).

 

It remains unknown the impact that Bourgoin’s work had on his students, and whether Morgan-who was a master in adopting different architectural styles-actually studied under him. Arabesque creates a space where the work of Morgan and Bourgoin is juxtaposed to reflect upon notions of appropriation and context. Anchoring his explorations around these two figures, Tabet presents a new body of work that sits between historical truths, chance encounters, and the migration of ideas.

 

Read more about the exhibition and the artist here

 

This event is free and open to the public. Please RSVP here.

Modernism Across the Sykes-Picot Line

Friday, February 14th, 2020

6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

 

97 Kenmare Street

New York, NY

 

Ines Weizman in conversation with Nora Akawi 

On the occasion of the launch of Dust & Data: Traces of the Bauhaus Across 100 Years by Ines Weizman

 

[RSVP]

 

#sfevents     @storefrontnyc

 

The infamous Sykes-Picot line, based on a 1916 secret treaty between the UK and France, partitioned the former Ottoman Empire and established mutually agreed upon spheres of influence between the UK, France, Russia, and Italy. It served to partially define the boundaries of what we now consider to be the Middle East, and has fed an endless conflict since. Drawing upon her recently published anthology Dust & Data, Ines Weizman (in conversation with Nora Akawi) will examine the hundred-year history of international modernism across the national and settler-colonial borders of the Middle East.

 

The Sykes-Picot Agreement established not only a line but a series of structures – British and French custom houses – that were built along its borders during the height of international modernism. Of the existing custom houses today, only two are within the jurisdiction of a single state. One of these, controlled by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, was recently occupied and blown out. The other, in the Israeli occupied Golan Heights, is considered a celebrated example of Bauhaus architecture, and is being converted into a hotel.

 

Using methods such as material analysis and documentation, Dust & Data includes a study of these buildings that connect them to the complex history of colonial control and occupation in the region, but also to modern architecture across Palestine and the Arab world, as well as to trans-Arabian infrastructures and routes of trade or exchange that are no more.

 

Ines Weizman is Director of the Bauhaus Institute for the History and Theory of Architecture and Planning and Professor of Architectural Theory at the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar. She is Founding Director of the Centre for Documentary Architecture (CDA). Weizman is the editor of the recently released publication Dust & Data: Traces of the Bauhaus across 100 Years, published with Spector Books, Leipzig (2019). In 2014, she was editor of Architecture and the Paradox of Dissidence, published by Routledge. Her book Before and After: Documenting the Architecture of Disaster, co-written with Eyal Weizman, was published in the same year by Strelka Press. Weizman has also worked on exhibitions and installations such as Repeat Yourself: Loos, Law, and the Culture of the Copy, exhibited at the 2012 Venice Architecture Biennale, as well as solo shows at the Architecture Centre in Vienna and the Buell Center at Columbia University, New York (2013). Other research and exhibition projects include: Celltexts: Books and Other Works Produced in Prison (2008, with Eyal Weizman), first exhibited at the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo in Turin and The Matter of Data (2019), which was shown in Weimar and Tel Aviv, and is currently on view at the Architektur Galerie Berlin.

 

Nora Akawi is an architect based in New York City. She is Assistant Professor of Architecture at The Cooper Union. Her research and teaching lie at the intersections of displacement, erasure, and memory within architecture—drawing from the areas of migration and border studies, mapping practices, and archive theory. Prior to joining The Cooper Union, Nora taught urban design and history/theory at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) at Columbia University. In 2012, she joined Columbia GSAPP and the Columbia Global Centers as Director of Studio-X Amman, a platform dedicated to advancing critical discourse in architecture in the Arab world through public programming, exhibitions, and publications, and other educational projects. Most recently, Nora curated Al Majhoola Min Al-Ard (“This Land’s Unknown”) at the Biennale d’Architecture d’Orléans 2019, and co-curated Friday Sermon, the Bahrain Pavilion exhibition in the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennial. She has co-edited books such as Friday Sermon (2018) and Architecture and Representation: The Arab City (2016). Akawi’s recently published work includes “Mapping Borderlands: Drawing From the Jawlan” in GTA Papers 2: War Zones (ETH Zürich, 2019) and “Worlding From the South” in Manifesta 12: Palermo Atlas, (OMA / Humboldt Books, 2018). Nora is a graduate of the Critical, Curatorial, and Conceptual Practices in Architecture program at Columbia University (MS.CCCP, 2011).

 

RSVP here.

أرابيسك

أرابيسك 

 ريّان تابت

 من ٢٣ كانون الثاني إلى ١٨ نيسان ‪ ٢٠٢٠‬ 

 [RSVP] الافتتاح: الخميس ٢٣ كانون الثاني ، من الساعة ٦ إلى الساعة ٨ مساءً

 

 

في مطلع عام ٢٠٢٠،أكثر من قرن بعد أن كانا كلاهما في كلية الفنون الجميلة في باريس، تلتقي مهندسة معمارية أميركية مع مؤرخ معماري فرنسي في اجتماع غير محتمل.

 

كانت جوليا مورغان ‪(١٩٥٧-١٨٧٢ )‬ أول إمرأة تدخل كلية العمارة في معهد الفنون الجميلة  في باريس لتصبح بعدها أحد أهم ممثلي حركة الفنون والحرف في كاليفورنيا. في وقت كانت فيه الحداثة في العمارة أسلوب جديد ومؤاتي، جاء تصميمها قصر هيرست في مدينة سان سيميون فخم ومعقد، استخدمت فيه عناصر زخرفية عديدة وخلطت أساليب معمارية مختلفة.    

 

 كان جول بورجوان ‪(١٩٠٨- ١٨٣٨)‬ قد أمضى الكثير من الوقت في أنحاء الشرق الأوسط وشمال أفريقيا. وثق رحلاته تلك بدقة ووضوح عبر رسومات لتفاصيل معمارية وحرفية تم نشرها في العديد من الكتب منها ” الفنون العربية” و.”عناصر الفن العربي”

 

لا أحد يعلم مدى تأثير بورجوان على تلاميذه بعد عودته إلى باريس وإن كانت مورغان أحد طلابه في كلية الفنون الجميلة. “أرابيسك” معرض يخلق مساحة لدمج أعمال مورغان و بورجوان و للتساؤل عن مفاهيم الإستعارة والاستيلاء. في هذا المعرض، يقدم تابت مجموعة جديدة من الأعمال تقع ما بين حقائق تاريخية، لقاءات غير محتملة وتساؤلات حول هجرة الأفكار.

 

ريّان تابت فنان يعيش ويعمل في بيروت‪.‬  بالاعتماد على البحث الموجه، يستكشف تابت قصصًا توفر مفاهيم بديلة للأحداث الاجتماعية والسياسية الكبرى من خلال سرد فردي. استنادًا إلى دراساته في الهندسة المعمارية والنحت، يبحث عمل تابت في المفارقات في البيئة المبنية وتاريخها عن طريق المنشآت التي تعيد تكوين تصور المسافة الجسدية والزمنية. أحدث معارضه الفردية تشمل مركز والكر للفنون في مينيابوليس، متحف المتروبوليتان للفنون في نيو يورك، باراسول يونيت في لندن، كاري دار في نيم، كنستفيرين في هامبورج ومركز ويت د ويت للفن المعاصر في روتردام. شارك تابت في مانيفستا ١٢, بينالي سيدني ٢١، بينالي إسطنبول ١٥، بينالي ساو باولو ٣٢، بينالي مراكش ٦، بينالي الشارقة ١٠ و ١٢و في ترينالي النيو موزيوم الثاني.

 

دورات البناء

“أرابيسك” ثالث معرض من “دورات البناء”,برنامج مدته عام ينظر إلى عملية البناء كمكان ومنهج. هذا المعرض تحديداً يركز على مفاهيم الزخرفة والحرف للتساؤل على مفاهيم الإستعارة والاستيلا في الممارسات الحالية والتاريخية داخل بيئتنا المبنية. “أرابيسك” يأتي بعد أول معرضين في المجموعة، “هنا يعيش الناس” و”وزارة للجميع.”

 

Read more about the exhibition in English here.

Arabesque

1_logotype_small

Rayyane Tabet

January 23rd–April 18th, 2020

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Opening: Thursday, January 23rd, 2020

Press + Members Preview: 5:30 – 6 pm [RSVP]
Public Reception: 6 – 8 pm [RSVP]
 
See photos from the opening here.
 

#arabesque            #rayyanetabet           @storefrontnyc                

 

In 2020, an improbable meeting takes place between a young American architect and an older French architectural historian over a century after they were both at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris.

 

Julia Morgan (1872–1957) was the institution’s first female architecture student, and went on to become a prolific representative of the American Arts and Crafts movement in her home state of California. At a time when Modernism was coming into favor, her design for the Hearst Castle at San Simeon was grand and complex, utilizing decorative elements and mixing many architectural styles.

 

Jules Bourgoin (1838–1908) was a Paris-born professor who spent much time traveling across the Middle East and North Africa. Bourgoin’s trips were intricately documented, and his keen interest in architectural detail and ornamentation was made visible through elaborate drawings that were incorporated into publications such as Les Arts Arabes (“The Arab Arts”) and Les Eléments de l’Art Arabe (“The Elements of Arab Art”).

 

It remains unknown the impact that Bourgoin’s work had on his students, and whether Morgan—who was a master in adopting different architectural styles—actually studied under him. Arabesque creates a space where the work of Morgan and Bourgoin is juxtaposed to reflect upon notions of appropriation and context. Anchoring his explorations around these two figures, Tabet presents a new body of work that sits between historical truths, chance encounters, and the migration of ideas.

 

About the Artist

Rayyane Tabet lives and works in Beirut. Drawing from experience and self-directed research, Tabet explores stories that offer alternative understandings of major socio-political events through individual narratives. Informed by his training in architecture and sculpture, Tabet’s work investigates paradoxes in the built environment and its history by way of installations that reconstitute the perception of physical and temporal distance. His most recent and upcoming solo shows include the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, Parasol Unit in London, Carré d’Art in Nîmes, Kunstverein in Hamburg, and Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art in Rotterdam. His work was featured in Manifesta 12, the 21st Biennale of Sydney, the 15th Istanbul Biennial, the 32nd São Paulo Biennial, the 6th Marrakech Biennale, the 10th and 12th Sharjah Biennials, and the 2nd New Museum Triennial.

 

Building Cycles

Arabesque is the third exhibition in Building Cycles, Storefront’s year-long curatorial program that examines building as both a place and a process. Focused on decoration and ornamentation, this exhibition questions existing and historical modes of practice by examining the notions of context and appropriation in our built environment. Arabesque follows the first two exhibitions in the cycle, Aquí­ vive gente and Ministry for All.

 

 

Credits

Arabesque by Rayyane Tabet. Graphic design by Morcos Key. Organized by Storefront for Art and Architecture, 2020.

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture Team:

José Esparza Chong Cuy, Executive Director and Chief Curator

Jinny Khanduja, Deputy Director

Jessica Kwok, Gallery and Operations Manager

Kweku Addo-Atuah; Axelle Dechelette; Eduardo Meneses; Victor Ohene, Interns

 

Support

Arabesque is generously supported by funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Violet Jabara Charitable Trust, and BKSK Architects.

 

 

vjlogo b&w BKSK_architecture_interiors_thick_gray

 

Arabesque is the third exhibition in Storefront for Art and Architecture’s year-long program of exhibitions and events, Building Cycles. Founding support of Building Cycles is generously provided by Linde-Griffith Construction Company and the Graham Foundation.

 

                     

    

Building Cycles has also been made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; KPF; Steven Holl Architects, WXY architecture + design; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

            nyc cultural affairs logo _small

Public Launch: Storefront’s Digital Archive

Launch Event:
Wednesday, December 18, 2019 / 6:00 – 8:00 pm 
 
Archive on View:
Thursday, December 19 – Friday, December 20 / 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
 
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY
 
With presentations by Francisca Benítez, Beatriz Colomina, Farnoosh Farmer, Claudia Gould, Lauren Kogod, Parker Límon, Cosimo Pori, Tal Schori, Amie Siegel, Anthony Vidlerand Aleksandra Wagner
 
 
#sfarchive     @storefrontnyc
 
On Wednesday, December 18th, Storefront for Art and Architecture hosts a holiday gathering in the gallery space to celebrate the launch of our digital archive, which consists of documentation from the organization’s 37-year history in the form of historical newsprints, rare publications, foundational texts, exhibition materials, and more. The digital archive is part of an ongoing archive project that began in 2015, and has been spearheaded by Storefront’s Archive Curator, Chialin Chou.
 
At the event, key figures from Storefront’s past and present will present curated selections from the digital archive in order to resurface some of the organization’s most memorable moments since its founding. The selections are curated by: Francisca Benítez, Beatriz Colomina, Claudia Gould, Lauren Kogod, Tal Schori, Amie Siegel, Anthony Vidler, and Aleksandra Wagner.
 
From the evening of Wednesday, December 18th through the end of the day on Friday, December 20th, Storefront’s digital archive will be available to browse in the gallery space, alongside newsprints and publications from our exhibition history and artworks from past events for sale.

 

Guests are welcome to browse Storefront’s digital archive, view the online selections by guest curators who participated in the public launch of the archive, and pick up some artwork for holiday gift giving. A reminder that all members of Storefront receive 10% off of select artwork and publications. To learn more about membership, see here.

 

We invite you to toast with us to the holiday season and to Storefront’s past, history, and future of experimental and critical programming about the built environment and the ways in which we inhabit it.
 
About the Archive Project
As one of the first alternative spaces in New York City dedicated to presenting innovative and provocative work at the intersection of art and architecture, Storefront has accumulated an archive documenting its diverse and influential program of over 280 exhibitions and events dating from its founding in 1982. Featuring the work of more than 1,500 architects, artists, and designers (including Nam June PaikDan GrahamMary MissDiller + ScofidioLebbeus WoodsKiki SmithPetra BlaisseCarolee SchneemannCoop Himmelblau, and more), this material contains a collection of original artwork, as well as over 115 cubic feet of proposals, correspondence, photographs, audio-visual media, and publications that together constitute a unique and underrepresented collection of narratives in contemporary cultural production and design.
 
The goal of Storefront’s archive is to significantly improve stewardship of and public access to Storefront’s collections. As a public design resource, the archive serves as a platform for research, ongoing programming, and collaborative partnerships with other resonant collections and organizations. The organization and digitization of Storefront’s archive has been made possible through the generous support of many funders; please see below for the full list.
 
Learn more about Storefront’s archive project and access the digital archive here.
 
SUPPORT
The digitization of Storefront for Art and Architecture’s archive is made possible by a major grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC). The archive has also received generous support from the Documentary Heritage Program of the New York State Archives, a program of the State Education Department; the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH); the Council on Library & Information Resources (CLIR); and Mr. Robert M. Rubin.  
 

 

         national archives logo

nys logo
neh logo

 

clir logo

 

 

Photo: Performance A-Z, Storefront’s first program at its original location on Prince Street.

Members Event: Private Tour of the New MoMA

 

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2019

9:30 am

 

The Museum of Modern Art

11 W 53rd St, New York, NY

 

With Charles Renfro, Partner of DS+R

 

[Members RSVP] [Become a Member]

 

#sfmembership          @storefrontnyc

 

On Tuesday, December 3rd, 2019, Storefront will host an exclusive tour of the new Museum of Modern Art, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro. The renovation, which opened to the public in late October, features a new lobby, bookstore, cafe, and several gallery spaces, expanding MoMA’s layout by one-third of its previously existing space.

 

The tour will be led by Charles Renfo, Partner at Diller Scofidio + Renfro and the Vice President of Storefront’s Board of Directors.

 

HOW TO RSVP

 

This tour is open to members of Storefront for Architecture. Space is limited. To attend, please RSVP here by Wednesday, November 27th, 2019. 

 

If you’d like to join Storefront’s membership program in order to attend the tour, see here for more information and email membership@storefrontnews.org.

 

 

Members Event: “Celebrating Geoffrey Bawa” at Callicoon Fine Arts

 

Thursday, November 21st, 2019
6:30 – 8:00 pm 
 
Callicoon Fine Arts
49 Delancey Street, New York, NY
 
With Channa Daswatte and Sean Anderson
 
 
#sfmembership          @storefrontnyc

 

On Thursday, November 21st, Storefront invites its members to participate in a guided tour and talk at Callicoon Fine Arts about Celebrating Geoffrey Bawa, a hybrid pop-up shop and exhibition dedicated to the celebrated Sri Lankan architect on the occasion of his centennial.

 

The event will include remarks by Channa Daswatte, a Sri Lankan architect and the last partner of Geoffrey Bawa’s firm whose work features prominently in the exhibition, and Sean Anderson, Associate Curator in the Department of Architecture and Design at The Museum of Modern Art. The event will be followed by a reception with the speakers.

 

Geoffrey Bawa (1919–2003) was a well-regarded Sri Lankan architect with an eponymous firm. Bawa arrived at architecture through landscape design in his late-thirties, following a brief career in law, and studied at the Architectural Association in Britain. His union of modernity, historical memory, and design became a beacon of regional architecture. While Colombo was the center of his professional and personal life, he earned commissions for private homes there and elsewhere, including India, the Maldives, Indonesia, and Fiji. He was also recruited for local projects including hotels, banks, a police station, schools, a train station, and Sri Lanka’s Parliament Building. His work was recognized by a civil honor award by the Sri Lankan government, earning him the title Deshamanya, meaning “highly meritorious service.” He was also awarded an Aga Khan chairman’s award for a lifetime contribution to architecture.

 

Channa Daswatte (b. 1965, Colombo, Sri Lanka) is Program Advisor for Bawa 100 and founder of MICD Associates in Sri Lanka. He was the last partner of Geoffrey Bawa’s firm after joining in 1991. Channa is the Chairperson of the Galle Heritage Foundation and has worked on a number of architectural, conservation, and curatorial projects including Corridors of Power, an installation most recently included in the Dhaka Art Summit 2018. Channa authored and edited Sri Lanka Style (2005) and has written for publications including A+U and Sri Lanka Institute of Architect’s Journal. He is a trustee of the Lunuganga Trust and Chairperson of the Geoffrey Bawa Trust.

 

Sean Anderson is Associate Curator in the Department of Architecture and Design at The Museum of Modern Art. A Fellow of the American Academy in Rome and the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, he has degrees in architectural design and architectural history from Cornell University, an M. Arch from Princeton University and a Ph.D in art history from the University of California, Los Angeles. He has practiced as an architect and taught in Afghanistan, Australia, India, Italy, Morocco, Sri Lanka and the U.A.E. His book, Modern Architecture and its Representation in Colonial Eritrea, was published in 2015 and was nominated for the AIFC Bridge Book Award for Non-Fiction. At MoMA, he has organized the exhibition Insecurities: Tracing Displacement and Shelter (2016).

 

Callicoon Fine Arts is located at 49 Delancey Street between Forsyth and Eldridge Streets. The nearest subway stops are the B and D trains at Grand Street and the F, J, M and Z trains at Delancey-Essex Street.

 

HOW TO RSVP
 
This event is open to members of Storefront for Architecture. To attend, please RSVP here by Thursday, November 21st, 2019. A wine reception will follow the event.
 
If you’d like to join Storefront’s membership program in order to attend the discussion, see here for more information and email membership@storefrontnews.org.
 
Read more about the exhibition here.

Letters to the Mayor: Berlin

Letters to the Mayor: Berlin

November 15th, 2019 – February 2nd, 2020 

Deutsches Architektur Zentrum – DAZ

Wilhelmine-Gemberg-Weg 6, 10179 Berlin, Germany

 

Opening Reception: Friday, November 15th at 7 pm

 

#letterstothemayor     #letterstothemayorberlin     @storefrontnyc

 

Storefront presents Letters to the Mayor: Berlin as part of the global project Letters to the Mayor in collaboration with the Deutsches Architektur Zentrum (DAZ). Each iteration presents a collection of letters by more than 100 architects, addressing the most pressing issues facing their city.

 

Letters to the Mayor: Berlin invites architects to write to the Mayor of Berlin, Michael Müller. On the evening of Friday, November 15th, there will be an opening reception with Mayor Müller and select participants of the exhibition discussing the state of architecture and the built environment in Berlin. All members of the public are invited to attend.

 

Participants

Esra Akcan, Aristide Antonas, Berk Asal, Yıldız Aslandoğan, Thomas Baecker, Matthias Ballestrem, Christophe Barlieb, Caro Baumann, Eike Becker, Uwe Becker, Verena von Beckerath, Sally Below, Helga Blocksdorf, Christine Bock, Friedrich von Borries, Chris Bosse, Malte von Braun, Benita Braun- Feldweg, Winfried Brenne, Jessica Bridger, Roger Bundschuh, Marius Busch, Nils Buschmann, Vanessa Miriam Carlow, Sam Carvalho, Hans-Jürgen Commerell, Jason Danziger, Christopher Dell, Dan Dorocic, Jan Edler, Tim Edler, Christine Edmaier, Franziska Eidner, Mascha Fehse, Kristin Feireiss, Lukas Feireiss, Jesko Fezer, Laura Fogarasi-Ludloff, Tom Friedrich, Jörg H. Gleiter, Bettina Götz, Nicholas Green, Heike Hanada, Saskia Hebert, Rainer Hehl, Mathias Heinz, Susanne Hofmann, Gerd Jäger, Helmut Jahn, Thomas Kaup, Theresa Keilhacker, Gabriele Kiefer, Erhard An-He Kinzelbach, Jan Kleihues, Julia Klink, Bettina Kraus, Thomas Kröger, Lars Krückeberg, Anupama Kundoo, Michael LaFond, Hilde Léon, Jens Ludloff, Michael Maginness, Ton Matton, Jeannette Merker, Tanaz Modabber, Stephen K. Molloy, Ingrid Moye, Ulrich Müller, Walter Nägeli, Anika Neubauer, Johannes Novy, Philipp Oswalt, Erica Overmeer, Klaus Overmeyer, Lukas Pappert, Markus Penell, Sofia Petersson, Joanne Pouzenc, Wolfram Putz, Alexander Rieck, Jacob van Rijs, Alexander Römer, Gunnar Rönsch, Eike Roswag-Klinge, Ines-Ulrike Rudolph, Ingrid Sabatier, Gudrun Sack, Johannes Schele, Gabi Schillig, Moritz Schloten, Julian Schubert, Elena Schütz, Joachim Schultz-Granberg, Stephan Schwarz, Alex Schweder, Max Schwitalla, Annelie Seemann, Rafi Segal, Johanna Sonnenburg, Maayan Strauss, Leonard Streich, Tilmann Teske, Lisa Tiedje, Katrin Voermanek, Petra Vondenhof- Anderhalten, Martin Voss, Tobias Wallisser, Thomas Willemeit, Peter Wilson, Lena Wimmer, Imke Woelk, Lennart Wolff, Ana Zatezalo Schenk, Christoph Zeller

 

PROJECT TEAM

 

Local Curators

DAZ

 

Wallpaper, Mayoral Desk, and Architect’s Table Design

something fantastic

 

ABOUT LETTERS TO THE MAYOR

 

Letters to the Mayor is an itinerant exhibition that displays real letters written by architects to their city mayors. Initiated by Storefront for Art and Architecture in 2014, the project has traveled to more than 18 cities across the globe, including Bogota, Mexico City, Athens, Panama City, Taipei, Mariupol, Madrid, Lisbon, and Buenos Aires, among others. 

 

Letters to the Mayor invites 100 architects in each city to write a letter to their mayor as a means of bringing innovative ideas and visions of the city closer to the decision-makers, and vice versa.

 

Throughout history, architects have engaged with this responsibility and the structures of economic, political, and cultural power in different ways and with varying degrees of success. With the rise of globalization and the homogenization of the contemporary city, the role of the architect in the political arena has often been relegated to answering questions that others have asked. 

 

Letters to the Mayor questions this dynamic, and invites local and global architects to deliver their thoughts directly to the desks of elected officials, and simultaneously into the public consciousness.