Manifesto Series: Souvenirs for an Ideal City

Tuesday November 28, 2017

Manifesto Series: Souvenirs for an Ideal City

Tuesday, November 28th, 2017

7 – 9 pm

 

#storefrontseries   #manifestoseries   #souvenirs   @storefrontnyc

 

With Joep van Lieshout, Arjen Oosterman, QSPACE, and Marga Weimans.

 

As a contemporary form of commercialized nostalgia, souvenirs are the ultimate cliche in the representation of a city. Pocket-sized, acritical, and cheap, they populate tourist sites all over the world with a patina of innocence.

 

Souvenirs produce collective imaginaries made up of lines that follow the profiles of superlative sculptures, buildings, and stories. They have become the reference points that anchor a particular culture in time, representing (consciously or not) political, cultural, and social values.

 

Manifesto Series: Souvenirs for an Ideal City is organized as part of Storefront’s current exhibition, Souvenirs: New New York Icons. The event invites an international group of architects, designers, photographers, curators, and researchers to reflect upon the objects and imaginaries that define the global city. Participants will reimagine the icons of the city, and will present manifestos for new “souvenirs for an ideal city” in an effort to explore the concept of iconography and what icons mean for the city today.

 

 

About the Participants:

Joep van Lieshout is a sculptor and visionary known for exploring the boundaries of art, of ethics, of society. His work is not limited to sculptures and installations, but also comprises buildings and furniture, as well as utopian and dystopian visions. In his projects, Van Lieshout focuses on systems, power, autarky, life, sex and death – the human individual in the face of the greater whole. In 1995, Van Lieshout founded his studio, Atelier Van Lieshout; ever since, he has been working under the studio moniker to undermine the myth of the artistic genius.

 

Arjen Oosterman is a critic, educator and curator. With a background in architectural history he is editor-in-chief of Volume magazine (since 2007). For Volume’s publisher Archis, he is engaged in book publications and projects, the current one being Trust in the Blockchain Society. As an educator, he taught architectural history and later on specialized in research and writing at schools of architecture. He published first and foremost in Archis and Volume, but also in other magazines like l’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui, Baumeister, Rassegna, and Manifesto. He has written, edited, and contributed to books on contemporary Dutch architects and architecture, contributed to Dutch television documentaries, been member of juries and awards, and lectured internationally.

 

QSPACE is a queer architecture research and design studio that defines itself as mixing queer theory, social justice, and design practice. Beyond a collection of individuals, QSPACE is a platform for research projects by students and professionals working on queerness in the built environment, producing research and outputs on topics such as gender inclusive bathroom design, LGBTQ homelessness and housing, and queer histories in architecture. QSPACE pushes for organized action through exhibitions, publications, digital archiving, and design guidelines, making questions of gender and sexuality visible to a field that has traditionally subverted such questions. In the absence of a centralized voice, QSPACE is a hub for students, professionals, and academics to connect and collaborate. As architects, the studio believes that design can and should play an active role in responding to social change, and hopes to offer the tools with which to create it.

 

Marga Weimans is an international fashion house that expands itself to multiple disciplines including fashion, architecture, and fine arts. Weimans graduated from the Antwerp Royal Academy of Fine Arts. Her work has been purchased by and exhibited at the Groningen Museum, and her collections were presented in two haute couture weeks in Paris and in several Dutch exhibitions. Weimans pushes the boundaries of the industry, exploring the connections between fashion and architecture. Her collections are very broad: from haute couture to pret a porter, including architectural showpieces and minimalistic dresses. She incorporates elements of nature and space, and uses earth tones and natural fabrics. She works with 3D perspectives, and has used materials such as wood, iron, and resin as well as creating her own material by mixing fabric with fiberglass. Weimans is also interested in exploring the role of black women in our current global, complex culture. With her collection “Source of Power Collection,” Weimans puts forth an image of the eccentricity, political incorrectness, and dignity that come to play in analyzing the contemporary black woman.

 

About the Manifesto Series:

”To launch a manifesto you have to want: A, B & C, and fulminate against 1, 2 & 3. Work yourself up and sharpen your wings…” -Tristan Tzara, Dada Manifesto (1918)

 

The Manifesto Series is one of the Storefron’s ongoing event series formats. It seeks to encourage the formulation of positions and instigate spirited discussion and exchange in a dynamic and polemical context. The format therefore differs from that of other talks and presentations. Rather than putting forth a synthetic lecture or a series of projects, participants are invited to deliver a concise, point-by-point manifesto, with the hope that their positions will provide the grounds for discussion to test various hypotheses in real time.

 

 

Attendance and Seating

All Storefront events are free and open to the public. Seating is on a first come, first served basis, with priority seating available for members of Storefront. If you are a member and would like to reserve a seat, contact jk@storefrontnews.org.

 

To become a member, see here.

 

 

Support

This event is part of the Crossovers Program, a collaboration between Storefront and the Het Nieuwe Instituut. The program is supported as part of the Dutch Culture USA program by the Consulate General of the Netherlands in New York.

 

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

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Salon Series: On the Politics of Performance

Tuesday November 14, 2017

“Marching On: The Politics of Performance” by Bryony Roberts, Mabel O. Wilson, and the
Marching Cobras of New York. Commissioned by Storefront for Art and Architecture, 2017.

 

Salon Series: On the Politics of Performance

Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

7 – 9 pm

 

#salonseries   #marchingon   #politicsofperformance

 

With Bryony Roberts, Mabel O. Wilson, and Eva Franch

 

As part of Marching On: The Politics of Performance, Storefront collaborates with Performa to host a salon series at the gallery space exploring the politics of performance.

 

A corresponding performance by The Marching Cobras of New York is presented on the Saturday and Sunday before the event at Marcus Garvey Park in Harlem. The event is free and open to the public, and is part of Performa 17. See here for more information.

 

African-American marching bands have long been powerful agents of cultural and political expression, celebrating collective identities and asserting rights to public space and visibility. With Marching On, Bryony Roberts and Mabel O. Wilson, professors at Columbia University’s GSAPP, collaborate with the Marching Cobras of New York, a Harlem-based after-school drum line and dance team, to explore the legacy of marching and organized forms of performance. Commissioned by Storefront for Art and Architecture, this new project interweaves echoes of the 1917 Silent Parade against racial violence with references to the revered Harlem Hellfighters in order to celebrate the crucial role of the community’s collective performances as acts of both cultural expression and political resistance.

 

Critical Halloween Party Bibliography: On Holes

Tuesday October 31, 2017

 

 

Storefront’s Critical Halloween Party Bibliography is a compilation of readings that acts as a resource for individuals interested in investigating the topic of each year’s Critical Halloween event. The bibliography for this year’s theme of “HOLES” focuses in particular on issues of presence/absence, matter, removal, and nothingness.

 

Holes appear to be made of nothing, and yet can be described by what takes place around, inside, and through them. In art and architecture, holes question our perceptions of matter and space, constructing, revealing, and inviting us to reflect upon what is real…and what is not. Scary.

 

We invite you to submit your own contributions to the bibliography ON HOLES. To do so, end an email with citations to info@storefrontnews.org.

 

Read more about Critical Halloween: Holes and purchase tickets here.

 

PARTY BIBLIOGRAPHY: ON HOLES

 

  • Barr, Jeff. 1001 Golf Holes You Must Play Before You Die. London: Ronnie Sellers Productions, 2005.
  • Barrada, Yto.  A Life Full of Holes. Autograph, 2005.
  • Bertamini, M., and Casati, R. ‘Figures and Holes’, in J. Wagemans (ed.), Handbook of Perceptual Organization, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014.
  • Bertamini, M., and Croucher, C. J. ‘The Shape of Holes’, Cognition, 2003, pp. 33–54.
  • Bozzi, P. ‘Osservazione su alcuni casi di trasparenza fenomica realizzabili con figure a tratto’, in G. d’Arcais (ed.), Studies in Perception: Festschrift for Fabio Metelli, Milan/Florence: Martelli-Giunti, 1975, pp. 88-110.
  • Buntrock, Dana. ‘Teshima Art Museum by Ryue Nishizawa, Teshima Island, Japan SANAA’, Architectural Review, 2011, Web.
  • Casati, R., and Varzi, A. C. Holes and Other Superficialities, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1994.
  • Dechristofano, Carolyn Cinami. A Black Hole Is Not a Hole. Charlesbridge, MA, 2012.
  • Demos, T.J. Life Full of Holes. Grey Room Inc., and Massachusetts Institute of of Technology, 2006, pp. 72–87.
  • Diedrich, Richard. The 19th Hole: Architecture of the Golf Clubhouse. Images Publishing, 2008.
  • Dimendberg, Edward. Diller Scofidio Renfro: Architecture After Images. University of Chicago Press, 2013, pp. 24, 156.
  • Ende, M. Die unendliche Geschichte: von A bis Z, Stuttgart: Thienemanns. English translation by R. Manheim: The Neverending Story, Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1983; reprinted by Puffin Books, 1985.
  • Gargiani, Roberto. OMA. EPFL Press, 2008, pp. 16.
  • Geach, P., 1968, ‘What Actually Exists’, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society (Supplement), 42: 7–16.
  • Giralt, N., and Bloom, P. ‘How Special Are Objects? Children’s Reasoning about Objects, Parts, and Holes’, Psychological Science, 2000, pp. 503–507.
  • Hoffman, D. D., and Richards, W. A. ‘Parts of Recognition’, Cognition, 1985, pp. 65–96.
  • Hofstadter, D. R., and Dennett, D. C., The Mind’s I. Fantasies and Reflections on Self and Soul, New York: Basic Books.
  • Holl, Steven. Parallax. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2000, pp. 17-18.
  • Hollier, Denis. Against Architecture: the writings of George Bataille. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1989, pp. 23.
  • Jackson, F. Perception. A Representative Theory, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1977.
  • Karmo, T. ‘Disturbances’, Analysis, 1977, pp. 147–148.
  • Lee, Pamela. Object to be destroyed: the work of Gordon Matta-Clark. MIT Press, 2001, pp. 67, 84.
  • Lewis, D. K., and Lewis, S. R. ‘Holes’, Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 48: 206–212; reprinted in D. K. Lewis, Philosophical Papers. Volume 1, New York: Oxford University Press, 1983, pp. 3–9.
  • Lewis, D. K. ‘Void and Object’, in J. D. Collins, N. Hall, and L. A. Paul (eds.), Causation and Counterfactuals, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2004, pp. 277–290.
  • Lewis, Paul, Marc Tsurumaki, and David J. Lewis. Manual of Section. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2016, pp. 17–18.
  • Martin, C. B. ‘How It Is: Entities, Absences and Voids’, Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 1996, pp. 57–65.
  • Meadows, P. J.‘What Angles Can Tell Us About What Holes Are Not’, Erkenntnis, 2013, pp. 319–331.
  • Miller, K. ‘Immaterial Beings’, The Monist, 2007, pp. 349–371.
  • Moos, Stanislaus von, and Jan de. Heer. Le Corbusier: elements of a synthesis. 010 Publishers, 2009, pp. 344.
  • Nelson, R., and Palmer, S. E. ‘Of Holes and Wholes: The Perception of Surrounded Regions’, Perception, 2001, pp. 1213–1226.
  • Rose, Julian, Stephanie Hanor, and Stephanie Weber. Sarah Oppenheimer. Oakland: Mills College Art Museum, 2016.
  • Sachar, Louis. Holes. Random House Children’s Books, 2011.
  • Simons, P. Parts. A Study in Ontology, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1987.
  • Sorensen, R. Seeing Dark Things. The Philosophy of Shadows, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.
  • Sudjic, Deyan. Norman Foster: A Life in Architecture. The Overlook Press, 2010.
  • Tucholsky, K. ‘Zur soziologischen Psychologie der Löcher’ (signed Kaspar Hauser), Die Weltbühne, March 17, p. 389; now in Gesammelte Werke, ed. by M. Gerold-Tucholsky and F. J. Raddatz, Reinbek bei Hamburg: Rowohlt Verlag, 1960, Vol. 9, pp. 152–153. English translation by H. Zohn: ‘The Social Psychology of Holes’, in Germany? Germany! The Kurt Tucholsky Reader, Manchester: Carcanet Press, 1990, pp. 100–101.
  • Vitruvius, and Morris Hicky Morgan. Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture. Chapter X: Catapults or Scorpiones. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. 1914.
  • Wake, A., Spencer, J., and Fowler, G. ‘Holes as Regions of Spacetime’, The Monist, 2007, pp. 372–378.

Critical Halloween: Holes

Tuesday October 31, 2017

Graphic design by Fru★Fru (Rosana Galian + Paula Vilaplana)

 

Critical Halloween: Holes

 

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

9:30 pm – late

 

Museum of Sex

233 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

 

SEE PHOTOS HERE

  
#criticalhalloween     #holes     @storefrontnyc
 

Critical Halloween is a party, an intellectual debate, a costume competition, and a space for the expression of radical thought. The event brings people together through music, dance, and costume to engage in critical discussion in New York City.

 

Each year, Critical Halloween celebrates a feared ghost of art and architectural production. This year, we explore HOLES.

 

Holes appear to be made of nothing, and yet can be described by what takes place around, inside, and through them. In art and architecture, holes question our perceptions of matter and space, constructing, revealing, and inviting us to reflect upon what is real…and what is not. Scary.

 

We invite artists, architects, designers, poets, lawyers, and other holed beings to join us at the Museum of Sex explore the conceptual depths of HOLES through sartorial guise.

 

DJ Mapquest will perform live sets throughout the night. Guests are invited to partake in an open bar, and to experience the Museum of Sex’s current exhibitions and installations.

 

Critical Halloween is a space of reflection and action based upon the belief that critical ideas have a place within even the most seemingly carefree manifestations of our culture: the Halloween costume party.

 

PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD

The People’s Choice Award, in partnership with The Architect’s Newspaper, will be decided in an online competition. Votes will be accepted through Friday, November 10th at 11:59 pm. View each of the entries and place your vote here.

 

 

COSTUME COMPETITION WINNERS
 
Best Individual Costume:
“Threshold” – Sebastian Grogaard
 
 
Best Duo/Couple Costume:
“Hole Foods” – Henning Strassburger and Daniel Topka
 
60_761A0374
  
Honorable Mention – Duo/Couple Costume:
“Holey-Roley (Rolex Learning Center) aka ‘Swiss Cheese'” –
Kate Chen and Ainslie Cullen
 
31_761A0204 
 
Best Firm/Group Costume: 
“Weep Holes” – FXFOWLE
 
68_761A0428
 
Best Overall Costume:
“Rhino Boolean” – Steven Holl Architects
 
22_761A0148
 
JURY
Costume competition winners were selected by a renowned jury comprised of:
  
Sean Anderson, Museum of Modern Art
Felix Burrichter, PIN-UP
Eva Franch, Storefront for Art and Architecture
Natasha Jen, Pentagram
Charles Renfro, Diller Scofidio + Renfro  
 

PARTY BIBLIOGRAPHY

See here for a list of publications and articles that inspired this years HOLES costumes.

 

________________________________

 

“I dug a deep hole in the basement of 112 Greene Street. What I wanted to do I didn’t accomplish at all, which was digging deep enough so that a person could see the actual foundations, the ‘removed’ spaces under the foundation, and liberate the building’s enormous compressive, confining forces simply by making a hole.” -Gordon Matta Clark

 

________________________________

 

 

LEAD SPONSOR
Arup
 
CRITICAL FIRMS*
DS+R
KPF 
Pentagram
Robert A.M Stern Architects
Steven Holl Architects
Weiss/Manfredi
CRITICAL COMMITTEE*  
Nanu Al-Hamad
The Architect’s Newspaper
Daniel Ayat
BIG
Sylvia Smith, FXFOWLE
Will Garris
Greta Hansen
Chase Kaars
Toshiko Mori Architects 
Margery Perlmutter
Russell Piccione Design
Protravel International
Valli Ravindran
SO-IL
Silvia Tomescu
WXY Architecture + Urban Design 
EVENT PARTNERS
Lagunitas Brewing Company
Tito’s Handmade Vodka
 
Main Photo by Jena Cumbo
Graphic Design by Fru★Fru (Rosana Galian + Paula Vilaplana)

We Like America: New Icon-i-Cities

Saturday October 21, 2017

Spacebuster: We Like America

NEW ICONICITIES
As part of It’s Happening! Celebrating 50 Years of Public Art in NYC Parks
Saturday, October 21st from 11 am to 3 pm
Central Park’s East Pinetum (East 84th Street entrance), located on the basketball courts 
See location here on Google Maps.
 
 
#spacebuster     #welikeamerica     @storefrontnyc     #ubermut    @raumlaborberlin    #newiconicities
 

NEW ICONICITIES brings together critical approaches to the shifting and complex iconography of the city. Presented during Souvenirs: New New York Icons, currently on view at Storefront’s downtown gallery space, the event includes a series of talks and a workshop inside the Spacebuster.  

 

For the Souvenirs exhibition, Storefront has commissioned 59 artists to produce original objects that represent and redefine the collective imaginary for each of New York City’s 59 community boards.

 

During New Iconicities, participants of the show will present their ideas about what should constitute an icon of the city today. In parallel to these open discussions, raumlaborberlin, the creator of the Spacebuster, will lead a public workshop that invites visitors to produce their own iconography for their neighborhoods, inspiring new ways of perceiving the city of New York.

 

This event is part of We Like America, an experimental road trip of the Spacebuster, and takes place in the context of It’s Happening! Celebrating 50 Years of Public Art in NYC Parks.

 

About We Like America

We Like America, presented in partnership with Übermut Project, is an experimental road trip of the Spacebuster, a temporary architectural structure designed by raumlaborberlin and commissioned by Storefront in 2009 in order to transform public spaces into impromptu community zones.

 

Exploring facets of the “American Dream” and seeking out new urban frontiers by transforming nomadic, transgressive, and transitory spaces, the Spacebuster is reprised through We Like America in a journey of the American Rust Belt.

 

With a multifaceted mission that includes fact finding, observation, and research, We Like America will pop up to investigate and organize around issues of collective societal desire in everyday life. The road trip kicked off in Chicago during the preview week of the Chicago Architectural Biennale, and then worked its way east with pit stops in St. Louis, Cleveland, eventually arriving in New York in October.

 

Read more about We Like America, the Spacebuster, and all the events here.

 

About It’s Happening!

As NYC Parks’ public art program took shape in the 1960s, artistic events called “happenings” popped up in parks across the city. Blurring the line between art and everyday life, these fleeting performances combined sculpture, music, theater, dance, and poetry. They varied in size and sophistication, but always relied on audience participation. Since its creation in 1967, Art in the Parks has featured over 2,000 works of art. 

 

This year NYC Parks is celebrating the 50th anniversary of its Art in the Parks program. It’s Happening! celebrate this milestone with dynamic public artworks, hands-on workshops, and performances that transform Central Park into a stage, museum, and art studio for a free day of public art. Art lovers, families, and park-goers will be delighted by free art exhibits, performances, and hands-on art workshops in Central Park’s beautiful East Pinetum field.

 

Read more about It’s Happening! here.

We Like America: Spacebuster x Brooklyn Boheme

Saturday October 14, 2017

Spacebuster: We Like America

 
 We Like America: Spacebuster x Brooklyn Boheme
Saturday, October 14th from 12 pm to 10 pm
Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn (enter at Washington / Dekalb)
 
#spacebuster     #welikeamerica     @storefrontnyc     @ubermutproject     @raumlaborberlin
 
As part of We Like America, an experimental road trip through the American Rust Belt to New York, the Spacebuster will set up shop in Brooklyn’s Fort Greene Park for a day-long program beginning with a furniture building workshop. Community residents are invited to participate in building a chair, and can take home their creations. The chair-building exercise is part of GENERATOR, an ongoing prototyping experiment by raumlaborberlin, where community input from each workshop engenders a new model. Brooklyn residents will build the “Sedia Venezana,” developed in Venice during the Architecture Biennale, and the feedback from this workshop will be used in the future towards the “Brooklyn Boheme Chair.”
 
At dusk, Spacebuster will present an hour of curated short films by Hamburg- and Berlin-based independent filmmakers such as Baltic Raw, with films including Quick Animation (1989), an Eastern Bloc “Berlin-wall era” take on hip hop culture. This will be followed by a screening of Brooklyn Boheme, a love letter to Fort Greene’s past as a vibrant cultural mecca of the late 80s and early 90s. Filmmakers Nelson George and Diane Paragas will participate in a discussion moderated by writer and performer Carl Hancock Rux (who is also featured in the film).
 
The events are free, kid-friendly, and open to the public.
 
Event Schedule
12:00 pm: Furniture making workshop as part of GENERATOR
6:00 pm: Screening of short works by Hamburg- and Berlin-based independent filmmakers
7:30 pm: Screening of Brooklyn Boheme
8:45 pm: Discussion with filmmakers Nelson George and Diane Paragas, moderated by Carl Hancock Rux
 

About We Like America

We Like America, presented in partnership with Übermut Project, is an experimental road trip of the Spacebuster, a temporary architectural structure designed by raumlaborberlin and commissioned by Storefront in 2009 in order to transform public spaces into impromptu community zones.

 

Exploring facets of the “American Dream” and seeking out new urban frontiers by transforming nomadic, transgressive, and transitory spaces, the Spacebuster is reprised through We Like America in a journey of the American Rust Belt.

 

With a multifaceted mission that includes fact finding, observation, and research, We Like America will pop up to investigate and organize around issues of collective societal desire in everyday life. The road trip kicked off in Chicago during the preview week of the Chicago Architectural Biennale, and then worked its way east with pit stops in St. Louis, Cleveland, eventually arriving in New York in October.

 

Read more about We Like America, the Spacebuster, and all the events here.

Marching On Performance

Saturday November 11, 2017 – Sunday November 12, 2017

Presented by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance as part of Performa 17.

Marching On Performance Teaser, November 2017. Commissioned by Storefront for Art

and Architecture. Video by Feran Mendoza and Chris Balmer.

 

 

Marching On Performance

Marcus Garvey ParkHarlem (enter at 122nd St. and Madison Avenue)

Commissioned by Storefront for Art and Architecture

Presented by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance, Storefront, and Performa

 

All performances are free and open to the public. Tickets are not required.

 

Saturday, November 11th, 2017

 

Sunday, November 12th, 2017

 

#marchingon     #politicsofperformance     #performa17     @storefrontnyc

 

Marching On: The Politics of Performance is a project commissioned by Storefront that explores the legacy of marching and organized forms of performance. African-American marching bands have long been powerful agents of cultural and political expression, celebrating collective identities and asserting rights to public space and visibility.

 

Bryony Roberts and Mabel O. Wilson collaborate with the Marching Cobras of New York, a Harlem-based after-school drum line and dance team in a new project that interweaves echoes of the 1917 Silent Parade against racial violence with references to the revered Harlem Hellfighters in order to celebrate the crucial role of the community’s collective performances as acts of both cultural expression and political resistance.

 

Marching On will be inaugurated with a series of performances presented by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance, Storefront, and Peforma during Performa 17. The performances are free and open to the public.

 

A subsequent exhibition will be presented at Storefront’s gallery space in early 2018. Read more about the exhibition here.

 

________

 

 

Project Credits

Marching On is a project by Bryony Roberts and Mabel O. Wilson in collaboration with the Marching Cobras of New York, commissioned by Storefront for Art and Architecture, and presented with the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance and Performa 17.

Commissioning Institution –  Storefront for Art and Architecture
     Chief Curator: Eva Franch i Gilabert
     Associate Curator: Carlos Mínguez Carrasco
     Director of Strategic Development: Jinny Khanduja
     Programs Producer: Max Lauter
Artistic Direction – Bryony Roberts and Mabel O. Wilson
Choreography – Terrel Stowers and Kevin Young of the Marching Cobras of New York
Performers – The Marching Cobras of New York
Costume Sourcing – Joseph Blaha and Morgen Warner
Cape Construction – Colin Davis Jones Studios
Fabric Printing – Design2Print
Graphic Design – Once-Future Office (Nikki Chung and Dungjai Pungauthaikan)
Videography and Film Editing – Ferran De Mendoza
Photography – Jenica Heintzelman
Research Assistance – Mariam Abd El Azim (Storefront for Art and Architecture) and Mayra Mahmood (Columbia GSAPP)
Production Assistance – Sasha Okshetyn and Maaike Gouwenberg (Performa)

 

 

Project Support

Marching On: The Politics of Performance is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, and the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

 

General Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

Photo: Marching Cobras rehearsal for Marching On, Marcus Garvey Park, Spring 2017. Courtesy of Storefront for Art and Architecture.

We Like America: In Response to Hurricanes

Wednesday October 4, 2017

Spacebuster: We Like America

In Response to Hurricanes

As part of We Like America: An Experimental Road Trip by Spacebuster

 

Wednesday, October 4th, 2017 at 6:30 pm

La Plaza @ The Clemente / 114 Norfolk Street

 

#welikeamerica    #spacebuster    @storefrontnyc    @ubermutproject    @raumlaborberlin

 

Spacebuster’s We Like America tour touched down in Chicago, St. Louis, Cleveland, and now stops in New York City. Its first NYC event takes place at The Clemente, where the discussion focuses on how art and architecture deal with issues of resilience and respond to natural disasters.

 

Addressing issues of migration, the recent humanitarian crisis in the Mediterranean, and the role of architecture in the response to natural disasters, In Response to Hurricanes features writer and architecture critic Niklas Maak, who will present his take on “emergency architecture,” followed by responses from Amy Chester, Director of Rebuild by Design, and Marcelo López-Dinardi, who trained as an architect in Puerto Rico. The responses, moderated by Carlos Mínguez Carrasco, contextualize the conversation around the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

 

This event is part of We Like America, a tour of the Spacebuster that seeks to explore various facets of urban American life.

 

We Like America is an initiative of raumlaborberlin in collaboration with Storefront for Art and Architecture, enabled by Übermut Project, 2017. Übermut Project is an initiative of visitBerlin and Hamburg Marketing, funded by the German Foreign Office. 

 

About the Participants:

 

Niklas Maak

Niklas Maak, born in 1972 in Hamburg, is an architecture theoretician working in Berlin, the arts editor of Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, and currently teaching at Harvard GSD. Since 2002, he has pursued parallel careers as a writer, educator, newspaper editor, architect, and visiting professor. Maak studied art history, philosophy and architecture in Hamburg and Paris. He completed a maîtrise in 1996, studying with Jacques Derrida, on the question of the threshold, and his PhD on the work of Le Corbusier and Paul Valery in 1998, with Martin Warnke at Hamburg University. Since then, he has undertaken continuous research on the history of mass housing, and models to re-engage with communal dwelling and collective housing.

 

He was a visiting professor for the history and theory of architecture at Städel Schule, Frankfurt, and has taught and lectured at the Universities of Basel, Berlin and Buenos Aires. In 2013, he co-designed and programmed, together with A77 and Pedro Gadanho of New York’s MoMA, an experimental, temporary, minimal collective dwelling structure, the Colony at MoMA PS1, in Queens. In 2014, he worked with Rem Koolhaas’ Biennial team as a consultant, and contributor.

 

For his essays, Maak has been awarded the George F. Kennan Prize (2009), the Henri Nannen Prize in Germany (2012) and the COR Prize for architectural critique (2014). His most recent publications include Le Corbusier: the Architect on the Beach, and Wohnkomplex, an investigation of the effects of fundamental technological, demographic and societal changes on housing, and The Living Complex, which researches concepts for a post-familial collective architecture.

 

Raumlaborberlin

Founded in 1999, raumlaborberlin acts at the intersection of architecture, city planning, art and urban intervention. Their work addresses forms of urban renewal in process. Urban locations that are torn between different systems, time periods or planning ideologies are of particular interest for the group.

 

Amy Chester

Amy Chester is the Managing Director for Rebuild by Design, an organization formed to run the Hurricane Sandy Design Competition, which resulted in over $1 billion in awards from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development to seven projects to address structural and social vulnerabilities in the New York region. Rebuild is now working in nine cities around the world, applying the same model of collaborative research and design to challenges of all sizes.

 

Amy brings over 20 years in municipal policy, community engagement, real estate development and communications to advocate for the urban environment. As Rebuild’s Managing Director, Amy is responsible the organization’s day-to-day operations, management and strategic direction.

 

Marcelo López-Dinardi

Marcelo López-Dinardi is an architect and educator based in New York interested in architecture and political economy. His writings have been published in The Avery Review, The Architect’s Newspaper and GSAPP Books, among others. As Partner of A(n) Office, a design and curatorial practice, he has exhibited at the US Pavilion in the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale and MoCAD in Detroit. He has taught at Barnard + Columbia, NJIT, Penn Design, RISD and Pratt. He is currently working on a research project about the spatial impact of Puerto Rico’s fiscal debt. Selected works can be found at www.marcelolopezdinardi.com.

 

 

About the Location:

 

The Clemente

The Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural and Educational Center Inc. (The Clemente) is a Puerto Rican/Latino cultural institution that has demonstrated a broad-minded cultural vision and a collaborative philosophy. While the Clemente’s mission is focused on the cultivation, presentation, and preservation of Puerto Rican and Latino culture, it is equally determined to operate in a multi-cultural and inclusive manner, housing and promoting artists and performance events that fully reflect the cultural diversity of the Lower East Side and the city as a whole.

Architecture Books / Yet to be Written / 1982-2017-2052

Saturday September 23, 2017

Launching the New York Architecture Book Fair

 

Saturday, September 23rd, 2017

The Great Hall at The Cooper Union

1:00 – 6:00 pm

RSVP [first come, first served; Storefront members get priority seating]

 

On September 23rd, Storefront for Art and Architecture will launch the New York Architecture Book Fair with a day-long event at The Great Hall at the Cooper Union.

 

Architecture Books / Yet to be Written / 1982-2017-2052 asks seminal voices to present and discuss the making of architecture and books. The event brings together major figures in the discipline and profession to reflect upon the last thirty five years of architecture and book production, and to evaluate the missing volumes of a history in the writing.

 

Each speaker will present an architecture book published in the last thirty five years that they consider to be fundamental to the understanding of contemporary architecture culture, as well as a “book yet to be written.”

 

Conference Schedule

 
1:00 pm – Welcoming Remarks by Nader Tehrani
1:05 pm – Introduction to New York Architecture Book Fair by Eva Franch
1:20 pm – Anthony Vidler
1:30 pm – Rafael Viñoly
1:40 pm – Sanford Kwinter
1:50 pm – Beatriz Colomina
2:00 pm – Henry Cobb
2:10 pm – Diana Agrest
2:20 pm – Eyal Weizman
2:30 pm – Stan Allen
2:40 pm – James Wines
2:50 pm – Joan Ockman
3:00 pm – Reinier de Graaf
3:10 pm – Richard Meier
3:20 pm – Peggy Deamer
3:30 pm – Enrique Norten
3:40 pm – Kenneth Frampton
3:50 pm – Spyros Papapetros
4:00 pm – Amale Andraos
4:10 pm – Daniel Libeskind
4:20 pm – Bernard Tschumi
4:30 pm – Ana Miljacki
4:40 pm – Thom Mayne
5:00 pm – Marion Weiss
5:10 pm – Nader Tehrani
5:20 pm – Mark Wigley
5:30 pm – Elizabeth Diller
5:40 pm – Closing Remarks
6:00 pm – End

 

As part of the event, Storefront will present BOOKS-NOW, a selection of signed architecture books published over the past year.At the conference, they will be accompanied by rare and out-of-print editions written by conference participants. Books will be on sale at a special discounted rate. See the full list of books here.

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This conference is presented in partnership with The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture of The Cooper Union.

 

Storefront events are free and open to the public, with limited access on a first come, first served basis. Members of Storefront and individuals affiliated with The Cooper Union can RSVP to reserve a spot. To become a member of Storefront, see here.
 
 

About the New York Architecture Book Fair

Storefront for Art and Architecture will present the first edition of the New York Architecture Book Fair in June of 2018 at Storefront’s gallery space and across a network of bookstores and private homes in the city. 

 

See more information about the book fair here, and feel free to contact architecturebookfair@storefrontnews.org with any questions.

 

 

 

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