Member’s Event: Guided Tour of New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original

Thursday May 11, 2023

 

Thursday May 11, 2023,

5pm-6pm

97 Kenmare St,

New York NY 10012

 

[RSVP]

 

Storefront members are invited to join curators for a guided tour of New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original, currently on view at Storefront. 

New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original looks at the spatial effects of the criminalization of informal markets and the contemporary repercussions this has on sidewalks and across the facades of Lower Manhattan. Over the course of the exhibition, Canal Street Research Association has “bootlegged” a historic Canal Street counterfeit bust by tracing its historical antecedents in order to understand current-day conditions. Presenting Ming Fay’s seminal Monumental Fruit public artwork honoring street vendors, the archival and speculative research for this re-staging takes various modes: resurfacing Fay’s proposals and artworks, creating a modular display system in collaboration with architectural collective common room, and pursuing an active intervention on Storefront’s facade.

 

Read more about New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original here.

 

If you would like to join and are not yet a Storefront member, please sign up here, or contact us at membership@storefrontnews.org.

 

Note to members: Please RSVP by Tuesday May 9.

Canal Street Research Association: FRUITS

Sunday May 7, 2023

Image courtesy of Ming Fay Studio

 

Sunday, May 7, 2023
3pm-5pm

97 Kenmare Street,

New York, NY,10012

 

[RSVP]

 

On Sunday, May 7, Canal Street Research Association presents FRUITS, a spring celebration and ode to triangles, street vendors, and the complexity of Canal Street. Beginning at their current exhibition, New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original at Storefront, visitors will embark on a meandering procession through the neighborhood streetscape before arriving at the tip of the so-called “Counterfeit Triangle” where Canal, Walker, and Baxter Streets meet — formerly home to a vibrant street market of produce sellers known as the Triangle Vendors. There, the small forest at the Triangle’s tip will play host to a set of performances and reflections from artist Emmy Catedral with poet Paolo Javier, channeling poet Frances Chung, and poet and critic John Yau, author of Crossing Canal Street. The group will convene under the trees to enjoy offerings and refreshments, including ephemeral hangings by artists Ryan Foerster and chef RJ Gitter, ad hoc seating by designer/builder Sebastijan Jemec, with materials donated by Citygroup and Bracket Creek Exhibitions.

 

Documentation courtesy of Loong Mah and Connor Sen Warnick.

 

Read more about New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original here.

 

On the Ground

New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original is presented as part of On the Ground, a yearlong research project and exhibition series about New York City’s ground floor. Through a close look at the urban typology of the storefront, this expansive endeavor presents newly commissioned artistic explorations and dialogues about the heterogeneous threshold between public and private space throughout 2023. The project will unfold through three exhibitions, a radio show, an open call, a public program, and a thematic reader. 

 

Support
Storefront’s On the Ground program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

Member’s Event: Tour of with Wardrobe

Saturday April 8, 2023

Pope. L, Roach Motel Black, 1993-95, Performance © Pope.L; 
Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
 
Saturday April 8, 2023
5pm – 6pm
Abrons Art Center
466 Grand Street, New York NY
 
 
Storefront members are invited to join in a walkthrough with Abrons Curatorial AIRspace Residents 2022-23, Laura Serejo Genes and Kiyoto Koseki, of with Wardrobe, a group exhibition featuring works by CFGNY, Devin Kenny, Erika Ceruzzi, K8 Hardy, Keioui Keijaun, Ken Lum, and Pope. L.
 
Through assemblage and performance, the artists reflect on self-styling as a practice that bridges private and public realms of appearance. Referencing various states of dress, with Wardrobe considers the body as a display mechanism tied to popular culture and global systems of material trade.
 

If you would like to join and are not yet a Storefront member, please sign up here, or contact us at membership@storefrontnews.org.

 

Note to members: This event has limited capacity. Please RSVP by Thursday April 6, 2023

Tomorrow is the Question: Benefit Art Sale

Thursday April 20, 2023 – Saturday April 22, 2023

Benefit Art Sale

 

 

 

Thursday – Saturday, April 20 – 22, 2023

kurimanzutto

520 W 20th St, New York, NY

 

[RSVP]

 

As we celebrate our 40th anniversary, Storefront for Art and Architecture is entering a new phase in which we aim towards building a more solid and stable institution. To this end, we’re launching the Storefront Futures Fund and will be hosting a benefit art sale at kurimanzutto’s recently opened New York gallery in Chelsea from April 20 – April 22, 2023. 

 

Founded by artists in 1982, Storefront has chronicled the changing landscape of cities from its iconic location in Nolita ever since. For the last forty years, we have supported artists and architects with an unflinching commitment to notions of publicness and community. 

 

RSVP for this event here.

 

Inquire about the works available here.

 

See the list of works available here.

 

With works by:

Felipe Baeza

Francisca Benítez

Abraham Cruzvillegas

Danielle Dean

Jonathas de Andrade

Minerva Cuevas

Rafael Domenech

Daqi Fang

Ming Fay 

Miguel Fernández de Castro

Raque Ford

Ignacio Gatica

Liam Gillick

Petrit Halilaj

Federico Herrero

Christian Hincapié

Akira Ikezoe

Alfredo Jaar

David L. Johnson

Jessica Kairé

Anna K.E.

Zoe Leonard

Florian Meisenberg

Jesús “Bubu” Negrón

Christian Nyampeta

Kayode Ojo

Damián Ortega

Jorge Pardo

Nohemí Pérez

Tania Pérez Cordova

Paul Pfeiffer

Wilfredo Prieto

Rose Salane

Shanzhai Lyric

Amie Siegel

Kiki Smith

Do Ho Suh

Rayyane Tabet

Rirkrit Tiravanija

Álvaro Urbano

Lulu Varona

Pae White

Jesse Wine

Anicka Yi

Rosario Zorraquín

 

 

Credits
Graphic Design by Estudio Herrera

 

Support
Storefront is grateful to kurimanzutto and participating artists and galleries for their commitment to independent spaces and generous support in this initiative. Additional support provided by Tequila Casa Dragones, RGNY Wines and Tacos No. 1, and Pinky Swear.

 

 

 

 

 

What Black Is This, You Say? Symposium

Wednesday April 26, 2023

 

 

Wednesday, April 26, 2023

6pm-8:30pm

Great Hall @ Cooper Union

7 E 7th St, New York, NY 

 

[RSVP]

 

In dialogue with What Black Is This, You Say?, the long term public artwork by Chicago-based artist Amanda Williams at Storefront for Art and Architecture, an evening of readings, propositions, conversations, and musings on the plurality, complexity, and nuance of Black experience(s) will be presented on the evening of April 26, 2023. 

 

Organized collaboratively by Storefront and The Cooper Union, this symposium celebrates the forthcoming monograph of Amanda Willams focused specifically on the public nature of her project What Black Is This, You Say?. Featuring an inter-generational group of artists, writers, scholars, thought leaders, and musicians, this event gathers them for an evening of creative exchange around the stakes, questions, and new horizons that Williams’ project puts forth. 

 

Please join us for a reading by New York Times culture writer J Wortham, a keynote lecture by Andres L. Hernandez, a panel amongst Williams, Deana Haggag, Justin Garrett Moore, and Mabel O. Wilson. As well as a special sonic performance by singer, songwriter, and poet Jamila Woods.

 

RSVP for this event here.

 

Note: Visitors must show security proof of vaccination or a negative PCR test by a third party (not home test) within three days of their visit to campus or a negative rapid test result taken by a third party (not home test) on the day of the visit to campus.

 

Symposium Program

6:00pm Doors Open

7:00pm Welcome by Cooper & Storefront 

7:10pm What Black Is This, You Say? Introduction by Camille Bacon

7:12pm Keynote by Andres L. Hernandez 

               “mighty/Black walls (the Blackness of blackness)”

7:40pm Reading by J Wortham 

               “NYT Uppercase”

7:45pm Panel with Amanda Williams, Mabel O. Wilson, and Justin Garrett Moore

Moderated by Deana Haggag

8:15pm Musical Performance by Jamila Woods 

8:30pm     Program Closes 

 

About the Participants

Andres L. Hernandez is a Chicago-based artist, designer, and educator who re-imagines the environments we inhabit, and explores the potential of spaces to support creative production, public dialogue, and social action. He is the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s inaugural and current SPACE artist-in-residence at Curie Metropolitan High School, a 2018–19 visiting artist-in-residence with the University of Arizona School of Art, and a 2018 Efroymson Family Fund Contemporary Arts Fellow.

 

Hernandez is a member of the performance collective Dark Adaptive with artists Torkwase Dyson and Zachary Fabri. Hernandez is cofounder of the Revival Arts Collective with Mecca Brooks, Frankie M. Brown, and L. Anton Seals, and founder and director of the Urban Vacancy Research Institute. From 2017 to 2019, he was an exhibition design team member for the Obama Presidential Center Museum, and currently serves as a creative consultant for other public projects and initiatives. Hernandez received a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Cornell University and a Master of Arts from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he is an Associate Professor.

 

Deana Haggag (she/her) is an arts administrator, cultural worker, executive leader, and strategic advisor. She is currently a Program Officer in Arts and Culture at The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Prior to joining the foundation in May 2021, she was the President & CEO of United States Artists, a national arts funding organization based in Chicago, IL. During her tenure, USA saw unprecedented growth, expanding its Fellowship award program, launching the Berresford Prize, and developing coalition efforts to advance support for individual artists most notably including Artist Relief, a $25 million COVID-19 emergency fund, and Disability Futures, a multi-disciplinary initiative supporting disabled creative practitioners. Before joining USA in February 2017, she was the Executive Director of The Contemporary, a nomadic and non-collecting art museum in Baltimore, MD, for four years. 

 

Justin Garrett Moore is the inaugural program officer for the Humanities in Place program at the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.  His work focuses on advancing equity, inclusion, and social justice through place-based initiatives and programs, built environments, cultural heritage projects, and commemorative spaces and landscapes.  He has extensive experience in architecture, planning, and design—from urban systems, policies, and building projects to grassroots and community-focused planning, design, preservation, public realm, and arts initiatives.

 

With over fifteen years of public service with the City of New York, Mr. Moore has led several urban design and planning projects, including the Greenpoint-Williamsburg Waterfront, Hunter’s Point South, and the Brooklyn Cultural District.  From 2016 to 2020, he was the executive director of the New York City Public Design Commission, where he spearheaded initiatives to address social equity and sustainability through improved built environment design and public processes.  His work spanned housing and community development, place and open space design, historic preservation, public art and monuments, and civic engagement.

 

Amanda Williams is a visual artist who trained as an architect. Her creative practice employs color as a way to draw attention to the complexities of how race shapes the ways in which we assign value to space in cities. The landscapes in which she operates are the visual residue of the invisible policies and forces that have misshapen most major US cities. Williams’ installations, paintings, and works on paper seek to inspire new ways of looking at the familiar, and in the process, raise questions about the state of urban space and ownership in America.

 

Amanda has exhibited widely, including the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale, a solo exhibition at the MCA Chicago, and a public project with the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis. She is a 2018 USA Ford Fellow, a Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters & Sculptors grantee, an Efroymson Family Arts Fellow, a Leadership Greater Chicago Fellow and a member of the multidisciplinary Museum Design team for the Obama Presidential Center. Her work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York and the Art Institute of Chicago. Williams lives and works in Chicago. Amanda Williams was selected as a 2022 MacArthur Fellow. 

 

Mabel O. Wilson  is the Nancy and George Rupp Professor of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, a Professor in African American and African Diasporic Studies, and the Director of the Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS) at Columbia University. At GSAPP she co-directs the Global Africa Lab. Wilson joined the faculty of Columbia in 2007 and she has held fulltime and visiting appointments at UC Berkeley, California College of the Arts, Princeton University, Ohio State University and the University of Kentucky. She is trained in Architecture and American Studies, two fields that inform her scholarship, curatorial projects, art works and design projects. Through her transdisciplinary practice Studio &, Wilson makes visible and legible the ways that anti-black racism shapes the built environment along with the ways that blackness creates spaces of imagination, refusal and desire. Her research investigates space, politics and cultural memory in black America; race and modern architecture; new technologies and the social production of space; and visual culture in contemporary art, media and film. 

 

Jamila Woods is a poet and R&B singer. Jamila Woods was born in Chicago and raised on the city’s South Side, in both Washington Park and the suburb Beverly Hills. Woods’s father is a physician, and her mother is a spiritual healer. 

 

Woods graduated from Brown University with a BA in Africana Studies and Theatre and Performance Studies. She has cited Gwendolyn Brooks and Lucille Clifton as poetic influences. In 2012, she published her first chapbook, The Truth About Dolls, which includes a Pushcart Prize-nominated poem about Frida Kahlo. Her poetry has been featured in the anthologies The Uncommon Core: Contemporary Poems for Learning & Living (2013), Courage: Daring Poems for Gutsy Girls (2014), and The Breakbeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop (2015).

 

J Wortham (they/them) is a sound healer,, reiki practitioner, herbalist, and community care worker oriented towards healing justice and liberation. J is also a staff writer for  The New York Times Magazine, and co-host of the podcast ‘Still Processing,’ They occasionally publish thoughts on culture, technology and wellness in a newsletter. J is the proud editor of the visual anthology “Black Futures,” a 2020 Editor’s choice by The New York Times Book Review, along with Kimberly Drew, from One World. J is also currently working on a book about the body and dissociation for Penguin Press. J mostly lives and works on stolen Munsee Lenape land, now known as Brooklyn, New York, and is committed to decolonization as a way of life.

 

Support

Storefront would like to thank the support for this program from The Cooper Union and The Cooper Union’s School of Architecture. Storefront’s program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors. Graphic Design for WBITYS? by Polymode.

 

 

Member’s Event: Tour of Gordon Matta-Clark & Pope.L: Impossible Failures

Thursday March 23, 2023

Pope.L studio, 2022. © Pope.L. Courtesy the artist and 52 Walker, New York

 

March 23rd, 2023
6pm-7pm

52 Walker

52 Walker Street, New York, NY

 

[RSVP]

Storefront members are invited to join in a walkthrough with curators of the current exhibition at 52 Walker, titled Gordon Matta-Clark & Pope.L: Impossible Failures.

Impossible Failures, pairs works by Gordon Matta-Clark (1943–1978) and Pope.L (b. 1955) and focuses on their shared fixation regarding the problematics of architecture, language, institutions, scale, and value.  

 

If you would like to join and are not yet a Storefront member, please sign up here, or contact us at membership@storefrontnews.org.

 

Note to members: This event has limited capacity. Please RSVP by Tuesday March 21, 2023

On the Ground: Open Sessions

Wednesday March 29, 2023 – Wednesday November 29, 2023

 

During the last week of each month Storefront will open the gallery for On the Ground: Open Sessions, inviting a different guest to curate and host the evening. These informal gatherings will open a space for collective learning where critical issues surrounding the transformation of New York’s ground floor are shared and discussed. 

 

See below for details on each of the open sessions. 

___________________________________________________________________________

 

Open Session #1: Hosted by David L. Johnson 

 

Wednesday March 29, 2023, 7 – 9 pm

 

Top: From the Street, I Can See the Moon by David L. Johnson, 2014 

Bottom: C’est Vrai (One Hour) by Robert Frank, 1990

 

About Open Session 1

For the first in our Open Session series, artist David L. Johnson convened an evening of conversation and collective learning around his own video work and C’est Vrai! (One Hour), a single-take film photographer Robert Frank made in 1990 on the streets of SoHo and the Lower East Side. Johnson convened writers Nicholas Dawidoff, Geelia Ronkina, and special guests to converse around street performance, pedestrian perspectives, and how we choose to document New York as it continues to change. 

 

About the Artists

David L. Johnson (b. 1993, New York, NY) is an artist who lives and works in New York City. Johnson uses photography, video, found and stolen objects, and installation to engage the margins between public and private space. Focusing on loitering and property law, his recent work has been interested in the complex relationship urban development engenders between the built environment and its living and non-living subjects. Johnson received a BFA from The Cooper Union in 2015 and an MFA from The University of Pennsylvania in 2020. He is an alum of the Whitney Independent Study Program and a part-time lecturer at The New School. Recent exhibitions include: Life Between Buildings, MoMA PS1, New York, NY; Everything is Common, Artists Space, New York, NY; Revocable Consents, Theta, New York, NY; A Place to Live, Tiger Strikes Asteroid, Philadelphia, PA; Wants & Needs, Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, New York, NY. Johnson’s work is in the public collection of The Studio Museum in Harlem.

 

Nicholas Dawidoff is the author of six books including the just-published The Other Side of Prospect: A Story of Violence, Injustice, And The American City. It’s a New Yorker book of the year and is a finalist for the New York Public Library’s Helen Bernstein Award for excellence in journalism. His biographical memoir of his grandfather, The Fly Swatter: Portrait of an Exceptional Character, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His memoir, The Crowd Sounds Happy, won the Kenneth Johnson Book Award for outstanding literary writing about mental illness. He has been a Henry Luce Scholar, a Guggenheim Fellow, a Civitella Ranieri Fellow, a Berlin Prize fellow of the American Academy, an Anschutz Distinguished Fellow at Princeton University, and an Art For Justice Fellow. His articles appear in The New Yorker and The New York Times Magazine including several pieces on the life and work of Robert Frank. He is a member of the Advisory Board of the Wesleyan (University) Center for Prison Education and a member of the Honorary Council of the Board of Directors of the MacDowell artist’s residency program.

 

Geelia Ronkina is a writer.

___________________________________________________________________________

 

Open Session #2: Hosted by Betty Yu 

 

Tuesday, April 25, 2023, 7 – 9 pm

[RSVP]

 

Note: This program has limited capacity and RSVP is required.

 

Image: MOCA No Jail Protests, 2019. Courtesy of Betty Yu.

 

About Open Session 2

For our second Open Session tomorrow evening at Storefront, multimedia artist and co-founder of Chinatown Art Brigade, Betty Yu examines on the ground socially-engaged movements, in particular the growing grassroots movement in NYC calling for the abolition of prisons, the police state and the carceral system as a whole. Since 2017, the city has continued to push forward plans to build 4 borough based jails in the guise of closing Rikers Island, one of the worst prisons in the U.S. One of those jails is in the heart of NYC’s Chinatown in Lower Manhattan. It will be the tallest jailscraper in the world. The other jails are being proposed in Kew Gardens, Queens; Downtown Brooklyn, and in Mott Haven, Bronx. Meanwhile, prominent activists from the feminist and social justice movement are praising a new initiative to build a “Feminist” Jail in Harlem.

 

Yu has assembled a special group of activists and community leaders— attorney, abolitionist, researcher and political educator, Jindu Obiofuma, Denise Zhou from W.O.W. Project, Mon Mohapatra from Critical Resistance NY, No New Jails NYC, and Inside/Outside Organizing Collective NYC, and Anna Ozbek, member of Chinatown Art Brigade, for a roundtable discussion to highlight critical grassroots approaches to advancing the fight for abolition in immigrant, low-income and communities of color.

 

Additional Resources shared and discussed during the open session available here.

 

About the Artist

Betty Yu is a multimedia artist, photographer, filmmaker and activist born and raised in New York City to Chinese immigrant parents. Yu integrates documentary film, new media platforms, and community-infused approaches into her practice, and she is a co-founder of Chinatown Art Brigade, a cultural collective using art to advance anti-gentrification organizing. She holds a BFA from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, an MFA in Integrated Media Arts from Hunter College/CUNY, and New Media Narratives program certificate from the International Center Photography.

 

Yu teaches video, social practice, art and activism at Pratt Institute, John Jay College of Criminal Justice/CUNY, and The New School, in addition to over 20 years of community, media justice, and labor organizing work. Among various distinctions, she was a participant of After the Plaster Foundation, or, “Where Can We Live?” (Queens Museum, 2020-21). In Fall 2020, she curated Imagining De-Gentrified Futures at Apex Art in Tribeca, NYC.

 

About the Participants

Jindu Obiofuma is an attorney, abolitionist, researcher and political educator committed to redefining the experience of justice, healing and safety. She is a believer in abolition democracy and in the inevitability of Black liberation. She has worked on issues of pretrial policy, juvenile justice policy and Black liberatory policy at Harvard, Columbia, and Law for Black Lives. She plans to do this work for as long as she is able and hopes to continue building community along the way. 

 

Denise Zhou is a filmmaker and cultural worker based in Brooklyn, New York. She is currently collaborating with the W.O.W. Project, a youth arts and anti-gentrification organization in Chinatown, as part of the Creatives Rebuild New York Artist Employment Program. 

 

Mon Mohapatra is an Indian abolitionist organizer, propagandist, and poet living on Lenni-Lenape / Canarsie land.  Her work uses play, collaborative art, and campaigning to push forward solidarity strategies to end anti-Black, casteist, ableist, anti-queer, and ecocidal state violence in the US and elsewhere, as expressed in systems of policing, imprisonment, coercion, family separation, and social control.

 

Anna Ozbek is a multimedia journalist, filmmaker, activist, and educator. She is a member of the cultural organizing collective Chinatown Art Brigade and the art-activist collective The Illuminator. Her work has appeared in CNN, NY1, National Geographic, Global Post, and Democracy Now!. She has an MFA in Integrated Media Arts from Hunter College and is an Assistant Professor of Visual Journalism at Purchase College.

 

___________________________________________________________________________

 

Open Session #3: Hosted by Viscose Journal

 

Tuesday, May 30, 2023, 7 – 9 pm

[RSVP]

 

Note: This program has limited capacity and RSVP is required.

 

Image: Still from The Creators of Shopping Worlds, © Harun Faroki, 2001

About Open Session 3

For the third Open Session, Viscose Journal presents a screening of Harun Farocki’s 2001 film The Creators of Shopping Worlds. 

 

The Creators of Shopping Worlds is an analytical study and visual essay on mall design. Set at the start of the millennium, between architect offices in Germany and a tech-convention in Las Vegas, Farocki uncovers how malls and shopping spaces are constructed to not only control movement of shoppers but shape their actual behavior. Through a combination of interviews and behind-the-scenes meetings with different planners and stake-holders, Farocki makes visible the intentions and technologies that govern retail spaces, while laying bare the sheer absurdity of their architects. 

 

The screening launches research inquiries around the forthcoming issue of Viscose Journal on “Retail”, which will be published in partnership with Storefront in Autumn 2023. “Retail” will collect responses to sites of shopping and urban spatial politics, from histories of vitrines and visual merchandising, to strategies of building and overcoming loss prevention systems. With special thanks to Harun Farocki GbR, this screening of The Creators of Shopping Worlds will be introduced by Viscose Journal “Retail” issue co-editor Camila Palomino and will be followed by conversations, snacks, and wine. 

 

About the Artists

Viscose Journal is a new journal for fashion criticism. Launched between Copenhagen and New York in 2021, the periodical published critical writing and projects by a wide range of authors from the worlds of art, fashion, literature, and academia. Through specially edited thematic issues, Viscose gives space to projects that challenge and expand the possibilities of research, practice, and critique of fashion. The forthcoming issue of Viscose Journal, on the topic of retail, is slated for publication in partnership with the Storefront for Art and Architecture in Autumn 2023. It is co-edited by Viscose Founding Editor-in-Chief Jeppe Ugelvig and New York City-based curator and writer Camila Palomino.

 

___________________________________________________________________________

 

On the Ground
On the Ground is a yearlong research project and exhibition series about New York City’s ground floor. Through a close look at the urban typology of the storefront, this expansive endeavor presents newly commissioned artistic explorations and dialogues about the heterogeneous threshold between public and private space throughout 2023. The project will unfold through three exhibitions, a radio show, an open call, a public program, and a thematic reader. 

 

Credits
On the Ground is conceived and organized by the Storefront Team

Graphic design by Estudio Herrera 

Photography by PJ Rountree 

 

Support
Storefront’s On the Ground program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

People’s Gardens: Walking Tour with the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space

Saturday November 12, 2022


Adam’s House in Paradise, 1984. Photo by Glenn Weiss. Storefront for Art and Architecture.

 

Saturday, November 12

2:30pm – 4pm

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

[RSVP]

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture, in partnership with the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space, invites you to join a walking tour of community gardens in Lower Manhattan. Led by Bill Di Paola and Marco Lanier from MoRUS, the walk will begin at Storefront’s gallery at 97 Kenmare Street and will culminate at La Plaza Cultural on East 9th Street in the East Village, meandering through six other sites along the route. Each of these gardens hold historical and political significance as places of resistance in the struggles against increasing real estate expansion and austerity. Stops include:
 
1. Elizabeth Street Garden
2. Liz Christy Garden
3. Garden of Eden Site
4. Children’s Magical Garden
5. 6B Garden
6. Carmen’s Garden
7. La Plaza Cultural
 
As a living history of urban activism, the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space (MoRUS) chronicles the East Village community’s history of grassroots action. It celebrates the local activists who transformed abandoned spaces and vacant lots into vibrant community spaces and gardens. Many of these innovative, sustainable concepts and designs have since spread out to the rest of the city and beyond.

 

This event has a limited capacity. Please RSVP to join us for this special afternoon.

 

—-

Support 

Storefront’s 40th Anniversary program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

Members Event: The Architects by Amie Seigel at The Museum of Modern Art

Tuesday October 25, 2022

Amie Siegel, The Architects, 2014. © 2014 Amie Siegel

 

Tuesday, October 25

4:30pm 

The Museum of Modern Art

11 W 53rd St, New York, NY

 

[RSVP]

 

Join us for a viewing of The Architects with artist Amie Siegel at The Museum of Modern Art. As a special event for our Storefront Members, Siegel will host an intimate conversation around this piece. 
 
The Architects, originally commissioned by Storefront for the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale as part of OfficeUS, is a film that cuts transversely through the city of New York, moving through ten architecture studios, unveiling the operational territories and landscapes of global architecture production. The piece was recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art and is currently on view in the Philip Johnson Galleries. 
 
If you would like to join and are not yet a Storefront member, please sign up here, or contact us at members@storefrontnews.org.
 
Note to members: This event has limited capacity. Please RSVP by Friday, October 21st
 
Amie Siegel works variously in film, video, photography, sound, sculpture, and installation. She is known for her meticulously constructed works that trace and perform systems of value, examine relationships between objects, materials, and spaces, and expose the plasticity of the moving image through sound and performance. The artist’s current and recent exhibitions include The Silence, ArkDes, Stockholm (2022); Bloodlines, Scottish National Museum Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh (2022); 34th São Paulo Biennial, Brazil; (2021); Medium Cool, Blaffer Art Museum, Houston (2019); Winter, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (2017); Strata, South London Gallery (2017), Double Negative, Museum Villa Stuck, Munich (2016) and Ricochet, Kunstmuseum Stuttgart (2016). Siegel has been a fellow of the DAAD Berliner-Künstlerprogramm and the Guggenheim Foundation and a 2021 Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants to Artists award recipient. She lives and works in New York City.

Artist Talk: Tehching Hsieh – One Year Performance (1981-1982)

Wednesday October 26, 2022

Wednesday, October 26

6:30pm – 8pm

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

[RSVP]

 

In the context of our 40th anniversary exhibition Public Space in a Private Time, artist Tehching Hsieh will share his experiences about One Year Performance (1981-1982). This seminal durational performance, where he spent an entire year living outdoors, concluded during Storefront’s inaugural program Performance A-Z in 1982.
 
This conversation by Hsieh, in dialogue with Storefront’s director José Esparza Chong Cuy, is an opportunity to delve deeper into the year preceding the opening of Storefront. Hsieh and his work offer a window into the politics of public space around the Lower Manhattan of that era.
 
For this particular performance, Hsieh spent a full year living outside and moving around New York while documenting his daily experience. He pledged never to enter any building or form of shelter during the entire duration of the piece. 
 
Performance A-Z was organized by Storefront’s founders, Kyong Park and R.L. Seltman, and artist Arleen Schloss, as a 26-day sequence of performances by New York-based artists — one for each letter of the alphabet. On the ninth evening, corresponding with letter I, Storefront’s community gathered outside of Hsieh’s apartment to witness the conclusion of his year-long performance piece. 
 
Please RSVP to join us for this special evening.

 

Tehching Hsieh was born in 1950 in Nan-Chou, Taiwan. Hsieh dropped out from high school in 1967 and took up painting. After finishing compulsory military service (1970-73), Hsieh had his first solo show at the gallery of the American News Bureau in Taiwan. Shortly after this solo show, Hsieh stopped painting. He made a performance action, Jump, in which he broke both of his ankles. He trained as a seaman, which he then used as a means to enter the United States. In July of 1974, Hsieh arrived at a small port near Philadelphia. He was an illegal immigrant in the States for fourteen years until granted amnesty in 1988.    

 

Starting in the late 1970s, Hsieh made five One Year Performances and a Thirteen Year Plan’, inside and outside his studio in New York City. Using long durations, making art and life simultaneous, Hsieh achieved one of the most radical approaches in contemporary art. The first four One Year Performances made Hsieh a regular name in the art scene in New York; the last two pieces, intentionally retreating from the art world, set a tone of sustained invisibility. Since the Millennium, released from the restriction of not showing his works during the thirteen-year period, Hsieh has exhibited his work in North and South America, Asia and Europe. Hsieh recent exhibitions Doing Time was presented by Taiwan Pavilion at 57th Venice Art Biennale 2017, One Year Performance 1980-981 was exhibited at Tate Modern, London, in 2017-2018, and MoMa and Guggenheim Museum, New York, in 2009.

 

Tehching Hsieh lives in Brooklyn, New York.

 

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Support 

Storefront’s 40th Anniversary program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.