SMART CITIES?

Sunday April 23, 2017

SmartCities500x500

SMART CITIES?

(Impossible Objects, Political Objects, and Measuring Objects)

 

Sunday, April 23rd, 2017

12 – 6 pm

 

The New School

Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Auditorium (Room N101)

66 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY

 

#SmartCitiesQuestionMark   #CityForces   @storefrontnyc   @NieuweInstituut   @newschool

 

What do we talk about when we talk about smart cities? How do we measure the smartness of a city? Who measures it? For whom? What are the tools, values, and constituencies involved in  measuring the built environment and the human edifices that inhabit them?

 

Smart Cities? was a conference of fictional and critical thoughts that was seeking to debate and measure the measuring of cities and the various urban epistemological models that define urbanization and development in the 21st century.

 

Organized in three panels: Impossible Objects, Political Objects, and Measuring Objects, this event presented a series of performances and presentations that bring architects, scholars, artists, sociologists, and scientists together to discuss the means and methods by which we think—and dream—about cities and urbanism, from the planetary scale to the city of New York.

 

Participants presented New Terms, New Indexes, and New Tools, bringing alive fictional and real pieces of technology, methodology, machine processes, information systems, and critical reflection in order to better understand and develop new and old forms of intelligence that shape our contemporary cities.

From biologically engineered urban agents to new cartographies, from technosolutionist approaches to postcolonial studies, Smart Cities? presented a series of projects, reflections, and propositional values that reflect upon notions of safety, fun, health, activism, education, infrastructure, diversity, memory, and the environment. Ultimately, the conference served as a forum to compel us to rethink the way in which various forms of knowledge are produced and reproduced within the value systems of our cities.

 

Smart Cities? was free and open to the public. 

 

____________________________________________________________________________

 

SMART CITIES? SCHEDULE:

 

INTRODUCTION

12:00 pm

Welcome and Introduction by Eva Franch and Shannon Mattern

 

PANEL 1

Impossible Objects (New Terms / New Constituencies)

12:00pm to 2:00pm, Moderated by Shannon Mattern

#ImpossibleObjects

 

With Jürgen Hermann Mayer, Lydia Matthews, Jorge Otero-Pailos, Vyjayanthi Rao, David Smiley, and Luke Swarthout

 

The city, despite its multiple formal and political structures, is a constantly changing body. What are the historical forms of knowing and sensing the city? What are its yet-to-be-identified intelligences and values? What new terminology do we need to build on those grounds? Each panelist presented a new term (a neologism, appropriation, portmanteau…) that defines and describes important means of knowing and sensing a specific city.

 

PANEL 2

Political Objects (New Values / Indexes)

2:00 to 4:00 pm, Moderated by Marina Otero

#PoliticalObjects

 

With Dorit Avganim, Dawn BarberMatthijs BouwIngrid Burrington, Farzin Lotfi-Jam / Mark Wasiuta, and Jim Venturi

 

Rapidly changing geographies of urban settlement, growth, and struggle in early 21st-century capitalism are transforming basic understandings of the city. What intelligences enable us to navigate across the disparate political spheres that define the city? Who owns, acquires, sells, shares urban intelligence? How might we form new alliances to reorient or subvert measurement and surveillance systems so they can aid in the creation of a more equitable metropolis? Each panelist presented a new index that provides a new indicator about the value of cities.

 

PANEL 3

Objects of Measurement (New Tools/New Typologies)

4:00 to 6:00 pm, Moderated by Eva Franch

#MeasuringObjects

 

With Paolo CirioAriane Lourie Harrison, Agnieszka Kurant, and Jeff Maki

 

To measure, to quantify the physical and intangible dimensions of a place, is to articulate facts in order to construct values. What can be measured can be capitalized, historicized, distributed, or sold. By creating new standards and guidelines for measurement we have the potential to affect new epistemologies and ideologies, to make new claims about “what counts.” How might we design new measuring tools that change how and what we measure—how we assign value—in our cities.” ? Each panelist presented a new tool that expands our understanding of the city.

 

____________________________________________________________________________

 

The conference was organized by Storefront for Art and Architecture in collaboration with The New School and the Urban Epistemologies seminar by Shannon Mattern, Kate Fisher, and Jack Wilkinson.

 

Smart Cities? was presented as part of City Forces, a year-long joint cultural crossover program between Storefront for Art and Architecture and Het Nieuwe Instituut, with the Netherlands Consulate General in New York. This event was presented as part of Control Syntax Rio, an exhibition on view at Storefront for Art and Architecture through May 20th, 2017. Special exhibition support for Control Syntax Rio is generously provided by Samsung and FoyerLive.

 

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

 

 

 

 

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Party Bibliography: On Luxury

Saturday October 29, 2016

#CriticalHalloweeen     #luxury     @storefrontnyc

 

Storefront’s Critical Halloween Party Bibliography is a compilation of readings that acts as a resource for individuals interested in investigating the topic of each year’s Critical Halloween event. The bibliography for this year’s theme of LUXURYfocuses in particular on issues of desire, excess, and aspirations of fairness.

 

Luxury can carry fluctuating pejorative and covetous connotations. With this bibliography, we collect existing philosophies, ideologies, and knowledge in the archives of history through a series of texts that sheds light upon the articulation of thoughts, costumes, and critique.

 

To submit your own contributions to the bibliography ON LUXURY, send an email with citations to info@storefrontnews.org. 

 

SF Crit Halloween Purchase Tikets

 

PARTY BIBLIOGRAPHY: ON LUXURY


 

 

Appadurai, Arjun. “The Social Life of Things : Commodities In Cultural Perspective.” Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986.

 

Berry, Christopher J. The Idea of Luxury: A Conceptual and Historical Investigation. Cambridge University Press, 1994.

 

Bourdieu, Pierre. “Distinction: a Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste”. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1984.

 

Brewer, John and Roy Porter, eds., Consumption and the World of Goods. London: Routledge, 1993.

 

Brucken, Carolyn E. Consuming Luxury: Hotels and the Rise of the Middle-Class Public Space, 1825-1860. George Washington University, 1997.

 

Burke, Timothy. “Lifebuoy Men, Lux Women : Commodification, Consumption, and Cleanliness In Modern Zimbabwe.”  Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1996.

 

Condello, Annette. The Architecture of Luxury. Farnham: Ashgate, 2014.

 

Dalby, Andrew. Empire of Pleasures: Luxury and Indulgence in the Roman World. London and New York: Routledge, 2000.

 

Frank, Robert H. “Luxury Fever : Why Money Fails to Satisfy In an Era of Excess.” New York, NY: Free Press, 1999.

 

Galbraith, John Kenneth. ”The Affluent Society.” Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998 [1958].

 

Hoffman, Jonas and Ivan Coste-Manière. Global Luxury Trends: Innovative Strategies for Emerging Markets. Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

 

Hont, Istvan. The Specter of Luxury. The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Political Thought,

 

Mark Goldie and Robert Wokler. Cambridge University Press, 2006.

 

Hine, Thomas. Populuxe. Knopf, 1986

 

Kastner, Olga Louisa. When Luxury Meets Art: Forms of Collaboration between Luxury Brands and the Arts. Berlin: Springer Gabler, 2014.

 

Koons, Jeff. Luxury and Degradation, 1986

 

Marx, Karl. Capital: A Critique of Political Economy. Moscow: Progress Publishers. English, 1886.

 

Maxine Berg and Elizabeth Eger, ed. Luxury in the Eighteenth Century: Debates, Desires and Delectable Goods. New York: Palgrave Macmillan 2003.

 

Miller, Daniel. “Stuff.” Cambridge: Polity Press, 2010.

 

Pearson, Giles. Aristotle on Desire, Cambridge University Press, Sep 29, 2016

 

Sekora, John. Luxury: The Concept in Western Thought, Eden to Smollett. Johns Hopkins University Press, 1977.

 

Sombart, Werner. Luxury and Capitalism. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan, 1967.

 

Thomas, Dana. Deluxe: How Luxury Lost Its Luster. Penguin, 2007.

 

Thomson, David. Renaissance Architecture: Critics, Patrons, Luxury. Manchester University Press, 1993.

 

Thorstein Veblen, The Theory of the Leisure Class, An Economic Study of Institutions. New York, 1899.

 

Voltaire, Luxury.” A Philosophical Dictionary, Volume 3. London: Hunt, 1824.

 

Waterson, Darren. “Filthy Lucre.” Freer and Sackler Galleries of Asian Art, Washington DC,  May 2015 –  January 2017

Critical Halloween: Luxury

Saturday October 29, 2016

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Critical Halloween: Luxury

 

Saturday, October 29, 2016

9 pm – 2 am

 

United Palace

4140 Broadway, New York

  
#CriticalHalloween     #luxury     @storefrontnyc
 

Critical Halloween is a party, an intellectual debate, a costume competition, and a space for the expression of radical thought. Over the past few years, it has become a referential event that brings people together through music, dance, and costume to engage in critical discussion in New York City.

 

Each year, Critical Halloween celebrates a feared ghost of art and architectural production. This year, we explore LUXURY.

 

Luxury is a chameleonic and shifting term. We use it to describe that which we desire; we all want to have the luxury of time, and some of us want to see it pass by on a luxury watch.

 

Derived from the Latin “luxus” (excess), the term carries fluctuating pejorative and covetous connotations. The modern confluence of excess and excellence conflicts with a world that also aspires to fairness and equality.

 

The appropriation of luxury as a marketing tool has penetrated contemporary life, and luxury itself is too often entangled in capitalistic and financial exuberance. Constantly bombarded by media campaigns, our individual and collective vectors of desire are constantly realigned with the products, services, and goods being marketed and sold to us. However, luxury cars, luxury goods, and luxury homes may in fact have little to do with luxury itself, and with the values behind our real aspirations.

 

Our decisions are often driven by the opinions and power of tastemakers and experts. This year, we are looking for new connoisseurs. Critical Halloween invites you to denounce obsolete definitions of luxury in art, architecture, and design, and to redefine its possibilities in shaping the future.

 

Critical Halloween is a space of reflection and action based upon the belief that critical ideas have a place within even the most seemingly carefree manifestations of our culture: the Halloween costume party.

 

COSTUME COMPETITION WINNERS

Best Individual Costume:
“Scales of White (a.k.a. Bad Ombre),” Evalynn Rosado

 
 
Best Duo/Couple Costume:
“In-Unit Washer and Dryer,” Faith Lim and Jumi Song

 
 
Best Group Costume: 
Waste is a Luxury in 2016,” Buro Koray Duman
 
 
Best Overall Costume:
“Luxury Plumbing” 
Studio Christian Wassmann 
+
“ALL GOLD EVERYTHAAANG, Please” 

yUUNg GOLD$tein
 
 
People’s Choice:
“The Duck and the Decorated Shed,”
Katherina, Katie, and Betty  

 

Read the Party Bibliography HERE.

 

 

For more Photographs, check our Flickr album:

Critical Halloween: Luxury

 

 

EVENT PROGRAM
Please note that the festivities are rated 21+. Remember to bring valid ID.
 
GRAND ENTRANCE
 
9:00 pm
Box Office Opens*
*Please pick up your ticket from will call. 
Note that box office tickets increase by $15 at the door.
 
ACT I
 
9:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Competition Registration and Portrait Photography*
*Please have your portrait taken by photographer Yuko Torihara 
by 11:00 pm to be entered into the costume competition. 
 
11:30 pm – 12:00 am
Ensemble Jury Deliberation*
*Featuring Sherry Dobbin, Eva Franch, Amit Khurana,
Curtis KuligBenjamin Prosky, Charles Renfro, and Anja Rubik.
 
INTERMISSION
 
12:00 am – 12:30 am
Screening of Winners*
*Please proceed to the main theatre for the 
presentation of awards in the categories of: 
 
Best Overall Costume
Best Individual Costume
Best Duo/Couple Costume

 Best Group Costume 
 
ACT II
 
12:30 am – 1:45 am
Portrait Photography Reprise, Luxury, and Leisure*
*Please help yourself to a drink, the dance floor, and music by dj mapquest.
 
FINALE
 
2:00 am
 Curtain Call
*Please exit stage left, or create an alternate ending.
 

 

PARTY BIBLIOGRAPHY

Need some inspiration for your costume? Check out our Party Bibliography HERE.

 

COSTUME COMPETITION PRIZES

This year the LUXURY jury will announce the awards at midnight. The jury will award prizes in the following categories: Best Overall Costume, Best Individual Costume, Best Duo/Couple Costume, and Best Group Costume. 

 

LUXURY JURY

Sherry Dobbin, Director of Public Art, Times Square Arts
Eva Franch, Chief Curator and Executive Director, Storefront for Art and Architecture
Amit Khurana, Founding Partner, Sumaida + Khurana
Curtis Kulig, Artist
Benjamin Prosky, Executive Director, AIANY & Center for Architecture
Charles Renfro, Partner, Diller Scofidio + Renfro
Anja Rubik, Editor in Chief, 25 Magazine

 
 
CRITICAL FIRMS
 
DS+R
Pentagram
Robert A.M. Stern Architects
Steven Holl Architects
Toshiko Mori Architects
Weiss/Manfredi
CRITICAL COMMITTEE
 
5468797 architecture
Damian Baden
Corcoran Sunshine Marketing Group
Sebastian ErraZuriz
Family New York
Belmont Freeman Architects
FXFOWLE
Seth and Ariane Harrison [HAt]
Lydia Kallipoliti
Büro Koray Duman
April Lee
Sara Meltzer
Mona Mahall (m-a-u-s-e-r)
Russell Piccione Design
Charles Renfro
SO – IL
Studio Christian Wassmann
Sumaida + Khurana
Karen Wong
ZERZA Architects
ENTERTAINMENT PARTNERS
 
dj mapquest
Tony Herbas
Joan Rodés and Remi Steinberg
Yuko Torihara
EVENT PARTNERS
  
Chilly Willy & Cool Carl’s Ice
Cosentino
Lagunitas Brewing Company
Noë & Associates
Linens by Razatrade
Original New York Seltzer
Tito’s Handmade Vodka
MEDIA PARTNERS
  
The Architect’s Newspaper
Luxury Listings NYC

 

 

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Membership Event: Tour of James Turrell’s Three Saros

Monday July 25, 2016

July 25th, 2016

6 pm

Small private tour

 
Storefront’s members are invited to attend a tour of James Turrell’s Three Saros, on Monday, July 25th. The installation, designed in collaboration with SITU Fabrication, is a 24′ tall, 2-story volume with a seamless GFRG interior and a polished solid surface exterior.  
 
For more information on the fabrication of Three Saros, see here.

 

Space is extremely limited for this event, with RSVP’s on a first-come first-served basis. If you are a Storefront member, and wish to attend the event, please see hereIf you are not a Storefront member and wish to attend, we invite you to join our membership program. For more information on membership levels and benefits, see here.

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

 

   

Radio Redux

Thursday June 30, 2016

In a Philadelphia, United States, office, on April 18, 1979 R. Buckminster Fuller holds up a Tensegrity sphere – one of his inventions that’s inspired a space project. Dr. Ernest Okress of the Franklin Center envisions the structure, made of rods and cables, as the basis for a Spherical Tensegrity Atmospheric Research Station – STARS. A giant Tensegrity sphere could be light and strong enough to support a floating space station a mile in diameter. (AP Photo/WGI)

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

7 pm

Storefront for Art and Architecture

97 Kenmare St, New York, NY

 

#radioredux     #buckminsterfuller     @storefrontnyc

 

With Mark Wigley and Andrés Jaque

 

Special guests: Allegra Fuller and Buckminster Fuller

 

Hosted by Eva Franch and Lars Muller

 

We live in radio. The real architecture of our world is that of electromagnetic frequencies. We are constantly being reshaped by countless overlapping waves that pulse through our buildings and bodies, yet we don’t really know what this means.

 

Radio Redux brings together Andres Jaque and Mark Wigley to discuss invisible architecture in the context of Wigley’s new book, Buckminster Fuller Inc.: Architecture in the Age of Radio (published by Lars Muller, 2015). Fuller will be present in voice and spirit, with recordings that reflect his obsessive, eccentric brilliance.

 

RSVP

This event is free and open to the public. If you are a Storefront member and would like to reserve a seat, you can RSVP here. If you would like to become a Storefront member, please see here.

 

Screen Shot 2016-06-23 at 1.14.37 PM

 

About the Book

Buckminster Fuller Inc.: Architecture in the Age of Radio, is an intellectual biography that rethinks the legacy of one of the key protagonists of the twentieth century. It shows that Buckminster Fuller, as a unique amalgam of theorist, designer, and performance artist, was devoted completely to the architecture of radio. The book draws extensively on Fuller’s archive to follow his thinking from toilets to telepathy, plastics to prosthetics, nanostructures to networks, and deep data to deep space. It shows that the critical arguments and material techniques of arguably the single most exposed designer of the last century were too radical to be grasped at the time, but have become urgently relevant today. In Bucky Inc., Fuller serves as a crucial reference point in trying to understand and engage our increasingly electronic world.

 

Copies of Buckminster Fuller Inc.: Architecture in the Age of Radio will be available for purchase at the event.

 

 

About the Speakers

 

Mark Wigley

Mark Wigley is a Professor of Architecture and Dean Emeritus of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. He is a historian and theorist who explores the intersection of architecture, art, philosophy, culture, and technology. His books include: Derrida’s Haunt: The Architecture of Deconstruction; White Walls, Designer Dresses: The Fashioning of Modern Architecture; Constant’s New Babylon: The Hyper-Architecture of Desire; and Buckminster Fuller Inc. – Architecture in the Age of Radio. He has curated exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art and The Drawing Center in New York, the Witte de With in Rotterdam, and the Canadian Center for Architecture in Montreal. He was born in New Zealand, trained there as an architect then as a scholar, and is now based in New York. He is currently co-curating the Istanbul Design Biennial 2016 with Beatriz Colomina on the question ARE WE HUMAN?

 

Andrés Jaque

Andrés Jaque, PhD Architect (ETSAM) and Alfred Toepfer Stiftung’s Tessenow Stipendiat, is a Professor of Advanced Architectural Design at the Columbia University GSAPP and a Visiting Professor at Princeton University School of Architecture.

 

He is the founder of the Office for Political Innovation, that has completed many renowned projects such as “TUPPER HOME,” “Plasencia Clergy House,” “House in Never Never Land,” “ESCARAVOX,” and “COSMO MoMA PS1.” They have been awarded the Frederick Kiesler Prize, the SILVER LION for Best Research Project at the 14th Venice Biennale, the Dionisio Hernández Gil Award, London Design Museum’s “Designs of the Year” Selection, and Architectural Record’s “Designers of the Year.” The office’s project “IKEA Disobedients” is the first architectural performance ever included in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, and it is part of a series of architectural experiments intended to explore design from the perspective of post-foundational politics.

 

Buckminster Fuller

Richard Buckminster Fuller was born on July 12, 1895, in Milton, Massachusetts. After spending most of his youth in Massachusetts and on Bear Island in Maine, he matriculated at Harvard University in 1913, only to be dismissed shortly after. From 1917-1919, Fuller served in the US Navy during World War I. In 1917, he married Anne Hewlett, the daughter of a prominent New York architect, and, after leaving the Navy, spent five years working with his father-in-law on new techniques of housing construction.

 

From 1927 onward, he became independent and committed himself to completely rethinking the question of shelter—relentlessly challenging every assumption about structure, function, materials, technology, aesthetics, services, distribution, mobility, communication, collaboration, information, recycling, politics, property, and social norms. He started from first principles to develop a radical philosophy. The purpose was to create a much more efficient and equitable distribution of planetary resources to enable the survival and ongoing evolution of the human species. His work paralleled, radicalized, and critiqued the mainstreams of modern architecture, and it still defies categorization today. He was a teacher and communicator who worked across the globe in every possible medium, becoming probably the single most exposed designer and design theorist of the twentieth century. He died in Los Angeles on July 1, 1983 at the bedside of his wife, who died thirty-six hours later.

 

Eva Franch

Eva Franch is a New York based architect, curator, educator, and lecturer of experimental forms of art and architectural practice. In 2004, she founded a solo practice called OOAA (Office of Architectural Affairs) and since 2010, has been the Chief Curator and Executive Director of Storefront for Art and Architecture. In 2014 Franch was selected by the US State Department with a project called OfficeUS to represent the United States Pavilion at the 14th Venice Architecture Biennale. Franch has taught at Columbia University GSAPP, the IUAV University of Venice, SUNY Buffalo, and Rice University School of Architecture.  

 

Lars Muller

Lars Müller, born in Oslo in 1955 and a Norwegian citizen, has been based in Switzerland since 1963. After becoming a graphic designer in Zurich, extended traveling, and a one-year assistant position with designer Wim Crouwel in Amsterdam, Müller established his studio in Baden/Switzerland in 1982. In 1983 Müller published his first book. As Lars Müller Publishers, he has produced some 600 titles to date.

 

Lars Müller is a passionate educator and has taught at universities in Switzerland and throughout Europe. Since 2009, he has been a guest lecturer at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. Müller frequently serves on academic and competition juries, and is currently a member of the steering board of Design Preis Schweiz. From 2013 to 2015, Müller was the international president of AGI Alliance Graphique Internationale.

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

 

   

Part II: Manifesto Series: In Our Time – The Sharing Movement

Tuesday July 19, 2016

MetBreuer_PhotobyEdLederman
Tuesday, July 19th, 2016  
7 pm
Storefront for Art and Architecture
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY
 
#storefrontseries     #manifestoseries     #InOurTime     #TheSharingMovement     @storefrontnyc     @metbreuer
 
Confirmed participants include:
Craig Nevill-Manning (Sidewalk Labs)
Mauricio Giraldo (The New York Public Library)
Mimi Hoang and Eric Bunge (nArchitects)
Shawn McLearen (Placeful)
 
The conversation will be moderated by Eva Franch i Gilabert, and will be followed by a roundtable discussion with Margery Perlmutter and remarks by Brian Butterfield (The MET) .
 

Manifesto Series: In Our Time – The Sharing Movement, is a two-part series presented by Storefront for Art and Architecture and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. How will today’s sharing movement affect the way we work, move, build, and produce new ideas and knowledge?

 

Participants will discuss this contemporary and ubiquitous movement, one that is increasingly influencing the exchange of goods, data, images, services, and spaces of residence and work. The series brings together leading practitioners and scholars embedded within the movement to explore its spatial, social, public, and private consequences, many of which are changing the future of urban life.

 

Events will take place on June 8th at the Met Breuer, and on July 19th at Storefront for Art and Architecture. Storefront will also publish a related book as part of its Manifesto Series that draws upon the issues presented during the event.

 
#sharingmovement
@storefrontnyc
@metbreuer
 
 
These events are free and open to the public, with seating on a first come, first served basis. Storefront members receive reserved seating. If you are a member and would like to reserve a seat, you can RSVP to aa@storefrontnews.org and specify which events you’ll be attending. If you would like to become a Storefront member, please see here.
 
A video of this event is available here
 
 
About the Participants: 

 

Margery Perlmutter

Margery Perlmutter is the Chair of New York City’s Board of Standards and Appeals. Prior to her appointment by Mayor Bill de Blasio, Perlmutter was a partner at Bryan Cave LLP. She counseled developers, architects, and non-profit institutions on zoning and land use, development enhancement strategies, building code, and related environmental issues. Perlmutter also represented owners in obtaining special permits, variances, zoning map and text changes, and other special approvals from governmental and quasi-governmental regulatory agencies, including the New York City Planning Commission, the Board of Standards and Appeals, and the Department of Buildings. Prior to practicing law, Perlmutter was, for more than 15 years, a managing partner at a private architecture practice in New York City. She has been a registered architect in New York since 1982.

 

Craig Nevill-Manning, Sidewalk Labs

Craig is Chief Technology Officer of Sidewalk Labs, leading the engineering team – which focuses on developing new urban technologies – and working with portfolio companies to develop their engineering teams and technology. Before joining Sidewalk Labs, he founded Google’s first remote engineering center, located in New York City. In his role as Engineering Director at Google, he oversaw the development of products including Google Local (now Maps) and Froogle (now Google Shopping), as well as features of web search such as Question Answering and Web Definitions.

 

As engineering director of Google.org, Google’s philanthropic arm, he co-founded Google.org’s Flu Trends and Crisis Response projects, providing maps, imagery and a missing persons service after crises in Japan and elsewhere.

 

Prior to joining Google in 2000, he was an assistant professor in the Computer Science Department at Rutgers University, and a Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Biochemistry Department at Stanford University. He is the author of 44 peer-reviewed academic publications, and was awarded a Career Grant by the National Science Foundation for work combining information retrieval and computational biology.

 

A native of New Zealand, he earned a BSc in Computer Science from Canterbury University and a PhD in Computer Science from Waikato University. Passionate about great coffee, he co-founded Happy Bones café in Little Italy with his wife Kirsten and partners from New Zealand.

 

Mauricio Giraldo, New York Public Library

Mauricio enjoys playing with code, objects and all things interactive. He is currently an interaction designer and manager of the Product and R&D group at NYPL Labs, The New York Public Library’s digital innovation unit. One of his favorite projects is Building Inspector, a tool to extract data from historic insurance atlases through a combination of computational and human processes.

Mauricio spent the last fifteen years designing and developing interaction design projects for a wide range of commercial, academic, private and public institutions. Mauricio is an Industrial Designer from Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia where he also lectured for six years. He also holds a Master in Human-Computer Interaction from Carnegie Mellon University.

 

Mimi Hoang and Eric Bunge, nArchitects

nARCHITECTS was founded by Principals Eric Bunge and Mimi Hoang with a goal of addressing  contemporary issues through innovative concepts, social engagement, and technical experimentation. The letter ‘n’ represents a variable, indicating the firm’s interest in designing for a dynamic variety of experiences within a systemic approach. The firm’s work instigates relationships between architecture and public space, and their dynamically changing contexts.

 

nARCHITECTS’ architecture provokes social interactions that in turn question basic building types and systems, responding to evolving criteria or phenomena such as weather (as in their bamboo Canopy for MoMA PS1, 2004); light and views (Switch Building, 2007); rising sea levels (New Aqueous City, Rising Currents, MoMA, 2010); shifting demographics (Carmel Place, 2016); and landscape (Chicago Navy Pier, 2016).  While engaging with complexity and flux, nARCHITECTS aims to create architecture with an economy of conceptual and material means. 

 

nARCHITECTS was recently honored with an American Academy of Arts and Letters award in Architecture and with the AIANY’s Andrew J. Thomson Award for Pioneering in Housing. Previous recognition includes The Architectural League’s Emerging Voices award, several AIANY Design Honor and Merit Awards, the Canadian Professional Rome Prize, Architectural Record’s Design Vanguard, and two NYFA grants.

 

Principals Eric Bunge and Mimi Hoang are Adjunct Assistant Professors at Columbia University.

 

 

Shawn McLearen
 
Shawn McLearen is a community real estate developer and consultant. As former Vice President of Real Estate Development for Artspace Projects, he spent a decade cultivating and administering over $100 million in public and private funds necessary to advance multi-policy, community development real estate projects in New York state. Partners, financing structures and regulatory requirements include private foundations, tax credit equity, state bonds, local / state / federal program funds, and community finance banking products.

Since that time he has co-founded Placeful, a non-profit community real estate development company with a mission to foster community space through socially responsible partnerships in finance, agriculture, education and the arts (placeful.org); and New York Hops & Grains (nyhopsandgrains.com) with a mission to bring Craft Beverage farming back to the Empire state. Previously, he co-founded Mixed Palate as a bi-lingual website that promotes sustainable food culture (mixedpalate.com); and Farm to Campfire as a platform to celebrate the produce and producers of the Hudson Valley (farmtocampfire.com). He is an Executive Committee member of the North East Foodshed Finance Alliance (foodshedfinance.org) and Food + Enterprise (foodandenterprise.com), and a Board Member of Slow Food NYC (slowfoodnyc.org). 

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

 

   

Part I: Manifesto Series: In Our Time – The Sharing Movement

Wednesday June 8, 2016

Part I:
Wednesday, June 8th, 2016
6:30 – 9 pm
The Met Breuer
945 Madison Avenue, New York
 
Tuesday, July 19th
7 – 9 pm, 2016
Storefront for Art and Architecture
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY
 
#storefrontseries     #manifestoseries     #InOurTime     #TheSharingMovement     @storefrontnyc     @metbreuer
 
With Daniel Davis, Jeff Maki, Leah Meisterlin, Anna Puigjaner, and Rafi Segal
 
Moderated by Eva Franch i Gilabert and Beatrice Galilee
 

Manifesto Series: In Our Time – The Sharing Movement, is a two-part series presented by Storefront for Art and Architecture and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. How will today’s sharing movement affect the way we work, move, build, and produce new ideas and knowledge?

 

Participants will discuss this contemporary and ubiquitous movement, one that is increasingly influencing the exchange of goods, data, images, services, and spaces of residence and work. The series brings together leading practitioners and scholars embedded within the movement to explore its spatial, social, public, and private consequences, many of which are changing the future of urban life.

 

Events will take place on June 8th at the Met Breuer, and on July 19th at Storefront for Art and Architecture. Storefront will also publish a related book as part of its Manifesto Series that draws upon the issues presented during the event.

  
These events are free and open to the public, with seating on a first come, first served basis.
 
 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; KPF; ODA; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 
This lecture is made possible by Dr. William Pordy.
 
 

OfficeUS and The Architects

Monday June 6, 2016

Monday, June 6th, 2016
9:30 pm
Mies van der Rohe Pavilion, Barcelona

 

Presented by Eva Franch i Gilabert and Martín Garber

 
On Monday, June 6th, Fundació Mies van der Rohe in Barcelona will host a screening of The Architects by Amie Siegel. 
 
The Architects, Commissioned by Storefront as part of OfficeUS (the US Pavilion at the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale), cuts transversally through the city of New York, producing a continuous image of the global architecture office today. 
 
Moving through several architecture studios, from Fifth Avenue to Downtown to Brooklyn, the film depicts the operational territories and landscapes of worldwide architectural production from New York. As a singular unfolding visual, the film deploys silent conversations among the architectures, locations, objects, and characters that inhabit its frames, and raises questions of scale, agency, and power.

Beyond the Front: Cocktails & Conversation

Friday May 27, 2016

Friday, May 27th, 2016
4:30 pm
The Bauer Hotel, Terraza on the Canal, Venice
 
with Eva Franch i Gilabert and Luba Michailova
 
Storefront for Art and Architecture’s Executive Director and Chief Curator, Eva Franch i Gilabert, will participate in Cocktails & Conversation with Luba Michailova of ISOLYATSIA as part of the opening of Architecture Ukraine: Beyond the Front.
 
Franch and Michailova will discuss the future of cities in places of ongoing conflict, framed through the work of the Architecture Ukraine residency program and Storefront for Art and Architecture’s international project Letters to the Mayor, which was presented with IZOLYATSIA in Mariupol, Ukraine.
 
For more information on Architecture Ukraine: Beyond the Front, see here.
 
Storefront invites its members who are attending the opening of the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale to attend. If you are a Storefront member and would like to RSVP, please see here.

SoHo Memory Project

Saturday June 4, 2016

On Saturday, June 4th, the SoHo Memory Project will be in residence at Storefront for Art and Architecture. Founded by Yukie Ohta, the SoHo Memory Project is a mobile museum, archive, and blog dedicated to preserving and sharing the cultural history of SoHo. The residency will feature material from Storefront’s archive of past exhibitions and programs.
 
Using unconventional media such as Viewmaster viewers, 3D-printed miniatures, and a smell station, The SoHo Memory Project exhibition chronicles the evolution of the area that is now called SoHo from farmland to high-end retail hub, charting its cycles of development and thus placing current day SoHo in the context of New York City’s history, focusing on the decades between 1960 and 1980, when SoHo was a vibrant artists community. Visitors are invited to navigate the bustling urban environment of today’s SoHo while gaining a glimpse of its past, by interacting with this hands/eyes/ears/nose-on exhibit, taking away a multi-sensory impression of SoHo history and an understanding of the many ways in which SoHo’s cultural pioneers influenced the larger cultural landscape of New York City and the world. Visitors will also have an opportunity to contribute to the exhibition by sharing memories about their own neighborhoods to illustrate the ways in which SoHo is at once unique and a part of a larger landscape of worldwide communities.

 

The SoHo Memory Project is part of a series of free and interactive public sessions hosted by four other SoHo Arts Network.

 

Calendar of Public Sessions with SoHo Memory Project

 

Judd Foundation, 101 Spring Street

Wednesday, January 13th, 4 – 5 pm

Wednesday, January 20th, 5 – 6 pm

Wednesday, February 17th, 4 – 5 pm

Wednesday, February 24th, 5 – 6 pm

 

The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster Street

Saturday, February 20th, 12 – 4 pm

Sunday, February 21st, 12 – 4 pm

Saturday, March 5th, 12 – 4 pm

Sunday, March 6th, 12 – 4 pm

 

The Renee & Chaim Gross Foundation, 526 LaGuardia Place

Thursday, April 14th, 6 – 8 pm

Saturday, May 21st, 1 – 4 pm

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture, 97 Kenmare Street

Saturday, June 4th, 1 – 4 pm

 

Center for Italian Modern Art, 421 Broome Street

Wednesday, July 13th, 6 – 8 pm

 

About the SoHo Arts Network

The SoHo Arts Network (SAN) (www.sohoarts.org) was founded in 2014 by a group of non-profit arts organizations based in New York City’s SoHo neighborhood to celebrate the rich history of SoHo’s unique creative community and to advance the neighborhood’s continued cultural contributions to the lives of both residents and visitors. Created in part in response to the misperception that SoHo has lost its arts community, the network provides an important platform to increase awareness of the neighborhood’s continued importance as an arts district, especially for non-profit organizations. The network facilitates and reinforces collaboration between institutions and artistic leaders within the area, and the sharing of best practices. In addition, the network seeks to further ignite the growth of the arts in the neighborhood through public programs and events exploring SoHo’s rich cultural history. Founding Members include Apex Art, Art in General, Artists Space, Center for Architecture: AIA New York Chapter, Center for Italian Modern Art, Dia Art Foundation, The Drawing Center, The Renee & Chaim Gross Foundation, HarvestWorks, Judd Foundation (101 Spring Street), Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, Recess, Storefront for Art and Architecture, and the Swiss Institute.