Members Event: Private Tour of the New MoMA

Tuesday December 3, 2019

 

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2019

9:30 am

 

The Museum of Modern Art

11 W 53rd St, New York, NY

 

With Charles Renfro, Partner of DS+R

 

[Members RSVP] [Become a Member]

 

#sfmembership          @storefrontnyc

 

On Tuesday, December 3rd, 2019, Storefront will host an exclusive tour of the new Museum of Modern Art, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro. The renovation, which opened to the public in late October, features a new lobby, bookstore, cafe, and several gallery spaces, expanding MoMA’s layout by one-third of its previously existing space.

 

The tour will be led by Charles Renfo, Partner at Diller Scofidio + Renfro and the Vice President of Storefront’s Board of Directors.

 

HOW TO RSVP

 

This tour is open to members of Storefront for Architecture. Space is limited. To attend, please RSVP here by Wednesday, November 27th, 2019. 

 

If you’d like to join Storefront’s membership program in order to attend the tour, see here for more information and email membership@storefrontnews.org.

 

 

Members Event: Private Tour and Discussion of “Celebrating Geoffrey Bawa” at Callicoon Fine Arts

Tuesday November 19, 2019

 

Thursday, November 21st, 2019
6:30 – 8:30 pm 
 
Callicoon Fine Arts
49 Delancey Street, New York, NY
 
With Channa Daswatte and Sean Anderson
 
 
#sfmembership          @storefrontnyc

 

On Thursday, November 21st, Storefront invites its members to participate in a guided tour and talk at Callicoon Fine Arts about Celebrating Geoffrey Bawa, a hybrid pop-up shop and exhibition dedicated to the celebrated Sri Lankan architect on the occasion of his centennial.

 

The event will include remarks by Channa Daswatte, a Sri Lankan architect and the last partner of Geoffrey Bawa’s firm whose work features prominently in the exhibition, and Sean Anderson, Associate Curator in the Department of Architecture and Design at The Museum of Modern Art. The event will be followed by a reception with the artists and speakers.

 

Geoffrey Bawa (1919–2003) was a Sri Lankan architect and the principal force behind what is today know globally as “tropical modernism.” Bawa arrived at architecture through landscape design in his late-thirties, following a brief career in law, and studied at the Architectural Association in Britain. His union of modernity, historical memory, and design became a beacon of regional architecture. While Colombo was the center of his professional and personal life, he earned commissions for private homes there and elsewhere, including India, the Maldives, Indonesia, and Fiji. He was also recruited for local projects including hotels, banks, a police station, schools, a train station, and Sri Lanka’s Parliament Building. His work was recognized by a civil honor award by the Sri Lankan government, earning him the title Deshamanya, meaning “highly meritorious service”. He was also awarded an Aga Khan chairman’s award for a lifetime contribution to architecture.

 

Channa Daswatte (b. 1965, Colombo, Sri Lanka) is Program Advisor for Bawa 100 and founder of MICD Associates in Sri Lanka. He was the last partner of Geoffrey Bawa’s firm after joining in 1991. Channa is the Chairperson of the Galle Heritage Foundation and has worked on a number of architectural, conservation, and curatorial projects including Corridors of Power, an installation most recently included in the Dhaka Art Summit 2018. Channa authored and edited Sri Lanka Style (2005) and has written for publications including A+U and Sri Lanka Institute of Architect’s Journal. He is a trustee of the Lunuganga Trust and Chairperson of the Geoffrey Bawa Trust.

 

Sean Anderson is Associate Curator in the Department of Architecture and Design at The Museum of Modern Art. A Fellow of the American Academy in Rome and the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, he has degrees in architectural design and architectural history from Cornell University, an M. Arch from Princeton University and a Ph.D in art history from the University of California, Los Angeles. He has practiced as an architect and taught in Afghanistan, Australia, India, Italy, Morocco, Sri Lanka and the U.A.E. His book, Modern Architecture and its Representation in Colonial Eritrea, was published in 2015 and was nominated for the AIFC Bridge Book Award for Non-Fiction. At MoMA, he has organized the exhibition Insecurities: Tracing Displacement and Shelter (2016).

 

Callicoon Fine Arts is located at 49 Delancey Street between Forsyth and Eldridge Streets. The nearest subway stops are the B and D trains at Grand Street and the F, J, M and Z trains at Delancey-Essex Street.

 

HOW TO RSVP
 
This tour is open to members of Storefront for Architecture. To attend, please RSVP here by Tuesday, November 19th, 2019. A wine reception will follow the event. 
 
If you’d like to join Storefront’s membership program in order to attend the tour, see here for more information and email membership@storefrontnews.org.
 
Read more about the exhibition here.

2019 Friends + Family Membership Dinner

Monday October 28, 2019

CSR_Mon_Mar_27

 

Monday, October 28th, 2019

Storefront for Art and Architecture

97 Kenmare, New York, NY, 7-11 pm

 

#membershipdinner     @storefrontnyc

 

Each fall, Storefront brings together 100 established and emerging voices in art, architecture, design, and planning for its annual Friends + Family Membership Dinner. This year, we celebrate the arrival of our Executive Director and Chief Curator, José Esparza Chong Cuy, and the launch of our new curatorial program, Building Cycles. 
 
The dinner will take place within the second exhibition of Building Cycles, Ministry for All, which presents the work of architect Carla Juaçaba and artist Marcelo Cidade.
 
Storefront’s membership family supports our unique mission and allows us to continue to develop innovative public programming at the intersection of art, architecture, and design. To join, renew, or upgrade your membership, contact us at membership@storefrontnews.org.
 
See photos from past dinners here.

 

Reserved Seating

 

Join us by becoming a member of Storefront at the Action Benefactor level or aboveTo become an Action Benefactor member or upgrade your membership in order to join us, please contact us at 212.431.5795 or membership@storefrontnews.org

 

Current members: to reserve a seat, please RSVP. 

 

 

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH 

 

 Patoro_GoldLogo_GrayBG_RGB_300dpi

 

 

BUILDING CYCLES PATRON

Linde-Griffith Construction Company

 

LINDE griffith

 

 

CURRENT MEMBERS

 

Visionary Dual Alternative Supporter 
Arup Caitlin Blanchfield and Farzin Lotfi-Jam

Diller Scofidio + Renfro

Ana Castella and Max von Werz

Lauren Kogod and David Smiley

N H D M

Kohn Pedersen Fox

Obra Architects
ODA Pernilla Ohrstedt

Robert M. Rubin

Platt Byard Dovell White Architects
  Joan Scott, D2 Groups

Dual Action Benefactor 

Adam Snow Frampton and Karolina Czeczek
Diana Agrest and Mario Gandelsonas  

Dillon Cohen and Katie Holten

Alternative Supporter 

Bernardo Faría and Georgiana Rothier

Mercedes Armillas

Steven Holl Architects

Basile Baudez
Leong Leong Bryce Beckwith
Studio Libeskind Peter Best

SO-IL

Brett Beyer

Anthony Vidler and Emily Apter

Matthew Celmer
  Kamilla Csegzi

Action Benefactor 

Glen Cummings
Abrons Family Foundation

Felecia Davis

The Architect’s Newspaper Kevin W. Davis
Bluedge Peggy Deamer
Bromley Caldari Architects  Neil Donnelly
Maddy Burke-Vigeland Peter Dumbadze
Stephen Cassell Keller Easterling
Beatriz Colomina Christopher Felts
Sharon Davis Gideon Fink Shapiro
Michelle Dilello Saul Fisher
Mark Fletcher Lukas Fitze
Gluckman Tang Architects Dan Graham
Molly Heintz Jerome Haferd
Knippers Helbig Larissa Harris
Caroline Hirsch Noushin Jafari
Peter Hochschild Brandt Knapp
Jon S. Hogden Arianne Kouri
Tracey Hummer Kengo Kuma

Mary Margaret Jones

Laura Kurgan
LevenBetts Michael Maltzan Architecture
Stephen Moser Kate Nation
Pentagram Carrie Norman
Alex Polier Katerina Paitazoglou
William Prince Emily Rauh Pulitzer 
Paul Richert-Garcia Peterson Rich Office
Annabelle Selldorf Adam Poinsett-Hall
SPAN Architecture Mark Rakatansky
Nader Tehrani Jacob Reidel
David van der Leer Alan Ruiz
D’juro Villaran-Rokovich Tal Schori
WEISS/MANFREDI David Shane
Mark Wigley Tyler Smith
  Michael Sorkin
Small Firm  Noah Steffes
Architecture at Large Joseph Tapia
Edwin Chan Ioanna Theocharopoulou 
inc_a Ryan Thomas
Jean-Louis Cohen Olga Touloumi
Marilys Downey John Trent Bromley
Belmont Freeman Architects Mar Urrestarazu
Claudia Gould Renee Viola
Susan Grant Lewin und_LLC
Deana Haggag Bettina Zerza
Andrew Philip Heid  
LOT-EK Emerging Supporter 
Magnusson Architecture and Planning Nohar Barnea 
Joeb Moore Lluis Alexandre Casanovas Blanco 
New Affiliates Stephanie Boyer
Once-Future Office Taylor Brophy
SOFTlab Johannes Knoopes
Irene Sunwoo Christian Mason
Bernard Tschumi and Kate Linker Manuela Paz
WXY architecture + urban design Dennis Rijkhoff
  Benjamin Sirota
Radical + Beyond  Alison Snyder
Luis M. Castañeda Two Points Films
Anne Rieselbach and Grant Marani  
W. Gavin Robb  
Aleksandra Wagner  

 

 

STOREFRONT MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS

 

ACTION BENEFACTOR

 

$1,000 individual / $1800 dual (for two individuals at the same address)

 

  • One invitation (2 for dual) to Storefront’s annual 100-person Membership Dinner in our gallery space
  • Invitations to private Storefront exhibition receptions
  • Three invitations to press and member previews of all exhibition openings at Storefront
  • Three invitations to a members-only curator led tour of each of Storefront’s exhibitions
  • Three invitations to members-only programming, including tours, discussions, screenings, drinks, dinners, and more with emerging and established voices in art and architecture
  • Passes and invitations to select architecture and art fairs
  • A complimentary copy of the Storefront Newsprints book
  • Guaranteed seating at Storefront events
  • Mailed copy of each of Storefront’s exhibition and program newsprints
  • Access to Storefront’s archives
  • Acknowledgment and listing on Storefront’s website and publications
  • 50% off of Storefront competition registration fees
  • 20% off of Storefront publications and books for sale in the gallery space

 

VISIONARY

 

$5000 Individual or Corporate

 

  • Ability to host one private event in Storefront’s gallery space per year
  • Private curator-led tours of each of Storefront’s exhibitions for friends, clients, colleagues, and/or staff
  • Two invitations to Storefront’s annual 100-person Membership Dinner in the gallery space
  • Invitations to private Storefront exhibition receptions
  • Unlimited invitations to press and member previews of all exhibition openings at Storefront
  • Unlimited invitations to a members-only curator led tour of each of Storefront’s exhibitions
  • Five invitations to members-only programming, including tours, discussions, screenings, drinks, dinners, and more with emerging and established voices in art and architecture
  • Passes and invitations to select architecture and art fairs
  • A complimentary copy of each newly released Storefront publication, as well as the Storefront Newsprints book
  • Guaranteed seating at Storefront events
  • Mailed copy of each of Storefront’s exhibition and program newsprints
  • Acknowledgment on Storefront’s website, emails, print invitations, newsprints, and gallery wall text for all exhibitions and programs
  • 50% off of Storefront competition registration fees
  • 20% off of Storefront publications and books for sale in the gallery space

Todos juntos (Everyone Together)

Saturday September 7, 2019

 

 

Todos juntos (Everyone Together)

Closing Event Program for Aquí vive gente

Saturday, September 7th, 2019

 

[RSVP]

 

#aquívivegente           @brigadapdt          @storefrontnyc

 

12–1 pm

Exhibition Tour by artist and Brigada member Margarita Ramos

Storefront for Art and Architecture: 97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

4–5:30 pm 

Youth Basketball Game: Puerta de Tierra vs. Lower East Side

Boys Club of New York: 287 East 10th Street, New York, NY

 

6–8 pm

Live medley of Joe Quijano’s music by members of Conjunto Cachana

The Loisaida Center: 710 East 9th Street, New York, NY

 

To mark the closing of Aquí vive gente: Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra, Storefront for Art and Architecture presents Todos juntos (Everyone Together).This day-long program begins with an exhibition tour by Margarita Ramos, a member of Brigada Puerta de Tierra and the artist of the mobile murals on the walls of the gallery space.

 

Afterwards, the murals will travel from the gallery space to the Boys Club of New York, where a team of young players from Puerta de Tierra, San Juan will play a friendly game against a local team from the Lower East Side brought together by The Loisaida Center. The game celebrates basketball as a manifestation of neighborhood pride, bringing to light the significance of the sport as a form of collective gathering, a platform for cultural interplay, and a catalyst for social change. The event honors the career of Puerto Rican basketball legend Jenaro “Tuto” Marchand, who passed away in 2017. Marchand left a deep imprint in his home neighborhood of Puerta de Tierra and served as an inspiration to the community and its emerging athletes.

 

After the game, all attendees and players are invited to The Loisaida Center for live music by members of Conjunto Cachana, whose former band leader, Joe Quijano, was born and raised in Puerta de Tierra. The band, put together by Quijano—who passed away earlier this year—features prominently in the section of Aquí vive gente that details the history of music in Puerta de Tierra. Quijano is remembered as a pioneer of salsa music and an advocate for his community. 

 

Visual arts, sports, and music are central to Puerta de Tierra’s identity and are core themes in the collection of the newly formed Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra. The museum aims to preserve and heighten the practice of artists, athletes, and musicians from the neighborhood through creative programs that bring everyone together. 

 

Todos juntos is co-hosted by Storefront for Art and Architecture,Brigada Puerta de Tierra, The Loisaida Center, and the Boys Club of New York.

 

Logo_Museo_draft_fromBPDT    Loisaida-Center-Logo-Final-1  0

 

 

SUPPORT

 

Brigada Puerta de Tierra is the recipient of the 2017 Visible Award (Cittadellarte – Fondazione Pistoletto, Fondazione Zegna), funding from which has supported this exhibition.

 

 

Aquí vive gente is the first exhibition of Storefront for Art and Architecture’s year-long program of exhibitions and events, Building Cycles. Founding support of Building Cycles is generously provided by Linde-Griffith Construction Company and the Graham Foundation.

 

 

 

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; KPF; ODA; Rockwell Group; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

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Open Meeting: Sharing Community Building Models

Friday August 9, 2019

Open Meeting: Sharing Community Building Models

August 9th, 2019

 

4–6 pm: Open meeting (RSVP: info@storefrontnews.org with a brief description of your work)

6–8 pm: Drinks, dancing, and music by Sonido Caluda

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

As part of Aquí vive gente, Storefront for Art and Architecture and the East Harlem Culture Collective will host an open meeting on Sharing Community Building Models that brings together local artists, collectives, and organizations focused on community engagement and cultural production in New York City. In a conversation moderated by Alonso Gorozpe, former coordinator of the East Harlem Culture Collective, participants will share their experiences on the opportunities and challenges for self-organized cultural initiatives. For more information or to attend, please email info@storefrontnews.org with a brief description of your work.

 

After the meeting, Aquí vive gente will remain open to the public late for a set by Sonido Caluda, an NYC-based pioneer of the movimiento sonidero who has been hosting parties in New York City and around the Americas for more than two decades. Movimiento sonidero is a genre of public parties and social events from Mexico City in which DJs and entertainers called “sonideros” bring together communities through dance, music, and oration. Read more about the sonidero movement here.

 

Storefront’s current exhibition, Aquí vive gente, presents the first iteration of the Museum of History and Community of Puerta de Tierra (MHC PDT). MHC PDT is a new cultural institution that seeks to preserve the memory and heritage of the neighborhood of Puerta de Tierra in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Initiated by a collective called Brigada Puerta de Tierra and led by community members from the neighborhood, the museum utilizes a horizontal model of governance in which its activities are determined collectively and based on community interest.

 

Read more about the exhibition here

 

SUPPORT

 

Brigada Puerta de Tierra is the recipient of the 2017 Visible Award (Cittadellarte – Fondazione Pistoletto, Fondazione Zegna), funding from which has supported Aquí vive gente.

 

 

Aquí vive gente is the first exhibition of Storefront for Art and Architecture’s year-long program of exhibitions and events, Building Cycles. Founding support of Building Cycles is generously provided by Linde-Griffith Construction Company and the Graham Foundation.

 

 

 

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; KPF; ODA; Rockwell Group; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

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Open Archive: Project DMZ, 30 Years After

Saturday April 20, 2019

Newsprint from Storefront for Art and Architecture’s 1988 exhibition, Project DMZ.

 

 

OPEN ARCHIVE: PROJECT DMZ, 30 YEARS AFTER

With Kyong Park, Dongsei Kim, Jungyoon Kim, Jinhyun Jun, Kangil Ji, Minkyung Song, Yehre Suh, Youngkyu Shim

 

Saturday, April 20th, 2019

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Symposium

3 pm – 5 pm

 

Book Signing by Kyong Park

Imagining Eurasia: Visualizing a Continental History

5 pm – 6 pm

 

[RSVP]

 

Imagine the Korean Demilitarized Zone as a tiger farm or an airport, as an amulet for the reunification of the peninsula, or covered in a blanket of metal.

 

In November 1988, Storefront presented Project DMZ, an exhibition organized by Kyong Park and Cathleen Crab that imagined how the Korean DMZ might be occupied for non-military and anti-political uses. At the brink of South Korean democracy and right after the Seoul Summer Olympics, when it seemed almost possible that the DMZ could be the next geopolitical line to be removed, artists and architects such as Paul Virilio, Nam June Paik, Mo Bahc, and Lebbeus Woods proposed strategies for inventive use of the space, rather than for its outright elimination.

 

Today, 30 years later, the political divide between the two Koreas remains. However, recent and dramatic political rapprochement between North and South Korea and the United States hint at the potential for radical transformations to take shape in and around the DMZ.

 

Drawing upon Storefront’s extensive exploration of its own archival material, Project DMZ, 30 Years After brings together contemporary voices that address the DMZ in their own work and places them in conversation with works from the original exhibition in 1988.

 

Together, participants will question the urgency and agency of art and architecture to build new visions that engage socio-political predicaments such as the political division of the Korean Peninsula. Through the study of the unique landscapes and architectures of the DMZ, Project DMZ: 30 Years After identifies borders as one of the most fundamental structures that function to define “us” and “them.” In the wake of this divide, participants will imagine new futures that better serve the commons.

 

Project DMZ: 30 Years After is presented as part of the programming for Storefront’s current exhibition, State of Tyranny by Theo Deutinger, which examines the objects and spatial manifestations of tyranny both worldwide and locally in New York City. The event is also the first in a series of open archive events that Storefront will present periodically as part of its upcoming program, utilizing materials and documentation from the organization’s 36-year history of exhibitions, events, competitions, publications, and projects, in conjunction with the organization’s ongoing effort to arrange, digitize, and preserve its archive for broad public access. To learn more about Storefront’s archive, see here.

 

The event also launches the publication Imagining Eurasia: Visualizing a Continental History by Storefront’s founding director, Kyong Park.

 

ABOUT IMAGINING EURASIA: VISUALIZING A CONTINENTAL HISTORY

Imagining Eurasia visualizes the historical precedents and contemporary reconstructions of Europe and Asia as one continent, envisioning a new relationship between East and West. The book highlights the significance of cities, networks, and territories within urban, regional, and continental geopolitics. Through his research, Park questions whether greater trade, migration, and cultural exchange bring about greater empathy and communion between different societies, or they instead deepen distinctions and result in conflict. The book also uses photographs, videos, graphics, animations, and texts to examine the constitution of points, lines, and areas that have morphologically shaped the space and time of Eurasia. Learn more here.

 

ABOUT THE PARTICIPANTS

Kyong Park is Professor of Public Culture at University of California, San Diego, as well as the founder and first Director of a number of institutions, including Storefront for Art and Architecture (1982–98), the International Center for Urban Ecology in Detroit (1998–2001), and the Centrala Foundation for Future Cities in Rotterdam (2005–06). Park has also served as curator of the Gwangju Biennale (1997), Artistic Director and Chief Curator of the Anyang Public Art Project (2010), and Project Director of Imagining New Eurasia at the Asia Culture Center (2015–17). He has exhibited at the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Castilla y León (Spain), the Kunsthalle Graz, the Deichtorhallen (Hamburg), the Kunst-Werke Berlin, and the Nam June Paik Art Center (Seoul). He is the editor of Urban Ecology: Detroit and Beyond (2005) and the author of Imagining Eurasia: Visualizing A Continental History (2019).

 

Dongsei Kim is an architect, urbanist, and educator. He is an Assistant Professor at the New York Institute of Technology. His research examines nation-state borders across multiple scales that explore the ways we define “us” and ‘them’ through architecture and urbanism’s spatial “inclusion” and “exclusion.” His research on the Korean Demilitarized Zone and urbanism has been widely exhibited and published internationally in Topos, Volume, Inflection, Landscape Architecture Frontiers, and The North Korean Atlas. He contributed to the Golden Lion award-winning “Crow’s Eye View” exhibition at the 14th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice. He has taught at Korea University, Columbia University, Carleton University, RMIT, and Victoria University of Wellington (VUW). He received an MDesS (distinction) from Harvard University, MSAUD from Columbia University, and a B.Arch (honors) from VUW.

 

Jungyoon Kim is the Founding Principal of PARKKIM, a Seoul-based landscape architectural firm, and a Design Critic in Landscape Architecture at Harvard GSD. She founded the firm with Yoon-Jin Park in Rotterdam upon their winning entry in the Taiwan Chichi Earthquake Memorial Design Competition (2004). She has also completed projects with diverse scales and landscapes, including Yanghwa Riverfront (2011), CJ Blossom Park (2015), SBS Prism Tower (2012), and Triple Street Shopping Mall (2016). Current ongoing projects include the H Zen Center in Chicago and Hyundai Motors Training Facility. PARKKIM’s work has been recognized widely by contemporary design professionals and thinkers. Kim and Park also collaboratively published a book called Alternative Nature (2016) the compilation of articles in various media since 2001. Kim received a Master of Landscape Architecture from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design and Bachelor of Agriculture from Seoul National University with distinction.

 

Jinhyun Jun was educated in both fine art and landscape architecture, and brings exceptional attention to the perception of users in three-dimensional experience. He attempts to use diverse media, as he believes that both fine art and design can serve to renew people’s perspectives. Jun received a Master of Landscape Architecture from Harvard University and holds a Bachelor of Fine Art and Master of Landscape Architecture from Seoul National University. He is currently an Associate at Field Operations and a founder of Studio M.R.D.O. Jun has designed many diverse spaces and typologies, such as urban developments, theme parks, public parks, and gardens.

 

Kangil Ji is a registered architect and co-founder of the design research studio DOH-GAM, founded with Namjoo Kim. While using his studio practice to investigate the relationship between environment, geometry, and human perception, he is concurrently working on higher education projects at Perkins+Will. He has won international design competitions including the Seoul Hall of Urbanism & Architecture (2015, for which he also was a lead-designer), Hongdae Culture Platform (2016), and Arch Out Loud (2017). He has participated in the Elements of Architecture publication and exhibition for the 2014 Venice Biennale. He is a member of the AIA and holds an M.Arch from Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

 

Minkyung Song is an architect, urban designer, and researcher specializing in large-scale urban design solutions. Minkyung received a Master of Architecture in Urban Design from Harvard University and a Bachelor of Architecture from Yonsei University in Seoul. Before co-founding Studio M.R.D.O, she had worked on numerous interior design, architecture design, and urban design projects with renowned design offices including Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill; and CAZA Architects. Minkyung also has been involved in research projects in Korea with AURI (Korea Architecture and Urban Research Institute) and LH (Korea Land and Housing Corporation).

 

Youngkyu Shim is the founder and director of Project-DAY. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of GARM Magazine. He studied at Architectural Engineering at Hanyang University, and has been a reporter for the Joongang Daily Newspaper and Assistant Manager at SPACE Magazine. His research article on the DMZ, “A Flexible Expansion of Space to Resolve Conflicting Borders: The Demilitarized Zone of the Korean Peninsula” was published in the Journal of Territorial and Maritime Studies in 2014.

 

Yehre Suh is an Assistant Professor of Urban Design at Seoul National University’s Graduate School of Environmental Studies, as well as Director of Urban Terrains Lab and the Office of Urban Terrains. She was the Curator of Asian Urbanism at the Asia Culture Center in Gwangju, Korea and has previously taught at Cornell University, Barnard College, City College of New York, and Pratt Institute. Suh’s research work focuses on the parallel urbanisms of North and South Korea. She is a registered architect in New York and New Jersey, and is a LEED AP BD+C accredited professional. She received a B.F.A. and an M.F.A. in Industrial Design from Seoul National University in Seoul, Korea, and a Masters in Architecture at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

 

CREDITS

OPEN ARCHIVE: PROJECT DMZ, 30 YEARS AFTER is organized by Dongsei Kim, with research assistance and project management by Yisoo Choi. The event is based on ongoing research on the Korean Demilitarized Zone and original archive materials from Storefront for Art and Architecture’s 1988 exhibition, Project DMZ, organized and curated by Kyong Park and Cathleen Crab.

 

SUPPORT

PROJECT DMZ: 30 YEARS AFTER is supported by the New York Institute of Technology’s Institutional Support for Research and Creativity (ISRC) Grants.

 

The digitization of Storefront’s archive is made possible by a major grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC). The archive has also received generous support from the Documentary Heritage Program of the New York State Archives, a program of the State Education Department; the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH); the Council on Library & Information Resources (CLIR); and Mr. Robert M. Rubin.
 
 
Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; KPF; ODA; Rockwell Group; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

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Tyranny Trail

Thursday March 28, 2019 – Saturday May 4, 2019


Presented as part of
State of Tyranny by Theo Deutinger

March 29th – May 4th, 2019

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Tyranny Trail Guided Tour Dates:

Saturday, April 13th:

11 am–1 pm

3 pm–5 pm

with Ingrid Burrington

 

Friday, April 19th

3 pm–5 pm

with John Michael Kilbane

 

Saturday, April 20th

11 am–1 pm

with John Michael Kilbane

 

Friday, April 26th

11 am–1 pm

3 pm–5 pm

with Rebecca Manski

 

[READ ABOUT TOUR GUIDES BELOW]

 

[RSVP HERE]

 

All tours are free of charge. Guided tours depart from Storefront for Art and Architecture’s gallery space and end at the 9/11 Memorial. The estimated duration of the tours is two hours. Please wear comfortable shoes and be prepared to walk in areas with high pedestrian and vehicular traffic.

 

How do we understand tyranny? Tyranny defines contemporary culture, and though it is often talked about conceptually, its more subtle spatial manifestations have a real impact on our cities and public spaces. Despite a steady rise in street-level activism, hostile and defensive design have gradually and quietly transformed our buildings, parks, and homes into sites of surveillance and societal control.

 

As part of the exhibition State of Tyranny, Storefront presents the Tyranny Trail, which follows a route through the streets of Lower Manhattan, beginning at Storefront’s gallery space and ending at the 9/11 Memorial. The trail, developed by Theo Deutinger, highlights methods of control such as roadblocks, wedge barriers, and other anti-terror measures. It also highlights smaller-scale “quality of life” interventions that are more inconspicuous in our urban context, such as anti-skateboarding devices, anti-homeless bench design, and anti-graffiti paint.

 

On four dates in April, guided tours will be led by experts whose work addresses related issues. Guides include: Ingrid Burrington, a researcher and writer who explores the often-overlooked physical landscapes of internet and surveillance infrastructures; John Michael Kilbane, a photographer who has recently documented hostile architecture in New York City; and Rebecca Manski, an independent researcher and educator whose work in the Wall Street area considers issues of displacement, occupation, and decolonization.  

 

For those who cannot attend scheduled tour times, the Tyranny Trail can be walked as a self-guided tour. Detailed maps of the route, available at Storefront’s gallery space, contextualize each stop of the tour, enabling visitors to explore the Tyranny Trail on their own.

 

A PDF map of the trail is also available for self-guided tours here.

 

Read more about State of Tyranny here.

 

ABOUT THE TOUR GUIDES

Ingrid Burrington writes, makes maps, and tells jokes about places, politics, and the weird feelings people have about both. Much of her work focuses on mapping, documenting, and studying the often-overlooked landscapes of the internet (and the ways in which the entire planet has become, in effect, a “landscape of the internet”). Her areas of inquiry vary widely, from the open-pit mines where minerals are extracted to create hardware, to the quiet insinuation of fiber optic cable and antennae into urban environments. By examining the political geography and embodied realities of living on a networked planet, she seeks to demystify these technologies for non-technical publics and to reframe technology’s underlying politics and power dynamics. Her writing has appeared in The Atlantic, The Nation, Popula, e-flux journal, and other outlets. She is also the author of Networks of New York: An Illustrated Field Guide to Urban Internet Infrastructure. Ingrid has previously taught at Rhode Island School of Design, the Cooper Union, and the School for Poetic Computation.

 

John Michael Kilbane is a photographer from Illinois. He studied literature at Marquette University and University College London and has since held jobs in publishing and at an independent bookstore in Brooklyn before entering the General Studies program at the International Center of Photography in 2016. His photographs are made out of a close observation and attention to the human-shaped world. See his work at www.johnkilbane.com.

 

Rebecca Manski is an independent researcher and educator specializing in the history of the Wall Street area, currently based at the South Street Seaport Museum. She first became intrigued by Lower Manhattan during her years with Occupy Wall Street’s Press Working Group. Before moving to New York to complete an Interdisciplinary Masters in Public History and Middle Eastern Studies, Rebecca lived in Palestine, doing media and advocacy work with a plethora of Palestinian organizations between 2003-2008. Having also lived the first five years of her life in Jerusalem, Rebecca’s thinking has always been informed by issues of displacement, walls, borders, liminal spaces, zones of indistinction, the Commons, and decolonization.

 

SUPPORT

State of Tyranny is supported by Creative Industries Fund NL and the Federal Chancellery of Austria.

 

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; KPF; ODA; Rockwell Group; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 
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Members Tour: United Nations

Friday January 25, 2019

UNtour

 

Friday, January 25th, 2019

4 – 6 pm

 

United Nations

 

With Ginni Wiik of the Royal Norwegian Consulate General

 

[Members RSVP]

 

#sfmembership @storefrontnyc

 

Members of Storefront for Art and Architecture are invited to a tour of the United Nations, led by Norwegian Consul Ginni Wiik.

 

Attendees will learn about the history of the UN complex, as well as how politics, architecture, and art have come together in the making of one of the most important political spaces in our city and across the globe. The tour will also make connections between the buildings and their surroundings, contextualizing the structures of the UN—as well as unseen aspects of their interiors—within the broader architectural history of Manhattan.

 

HOW TO RSVP

 

This tour is open to members of Storefront for Architecture. To attend, please RSVP here by Tuesday, January 22nd, 2019.

 

If you’d like to join Storefront’s membership program in order to attend the tour, see here for more information or email membership@storefrontnews.org.

Members Tour: ALL THAT IS SOLID by Pablo Gómez Uribe

Thursday December 13, 2018

Membership Tour Proxyco
 
Thursday, December 13th, 2018
7 pm 
 
PROXYCO Gallery
168 Suffolk Street, New York, NY
 
With Pablo Gómez Uribe
 
 
#sfmembership          @storefrontnyc
 

Members of Storefront for Art and Architecture are invited to a tour of ALL THAT IS SOLIDthe current exhibition at PROXYCO Gallery. The tour will be led by artist Pablo Gómez Uribe. 

 
Pablo Gómez Uribe uses his practice to investigate manifestations of social and political conflicts in urban environments, highlighting how traumatic events create new literal and psychological landscapes in cities. Gómez Uribe has previously worked with Storefront as the designer of the mayoral desk and architect’s table for Letters to the Mayor: Bogotá.
 
ALL THAT IS SOLID showcases recent work by Gómez Uribe that explores the notion of architecture as progress. The exhibition presents material tests for the building of a new fictional city, “Medenyal,” which has roots that lie in the demolished buildings of the artist’s hometown of Medellín. The show also puts forth proposals for new types of bricks made from the ruins of buildings and other materials, as well as exploratory artworks that problematize the relationships between memory and industry, culture and displacement, and dilapidation and development. 
 
HOW TO RSVP
 
This tour is open to members of Storefront for Architecture. To attend, please RSVP here by Tuesday, December 11th, 2018. A wine reception will follow the event. 
 
If you’d like to join Storefront’s membership program in order to attend the tour, see here for more information and email membership@storefrontnews.org.
 
Read more about the exhibition here.

Subculture Open Lab Days and Workshops

Friday November 2, 2018 – Saturday December 15, 2018

Screen Shot 2018-10-31 at 6.59.39 PM

Photo by Inessa Binenbaum.

 

Subculture Open Lab Days

With Dr. Elizabeth Hénaff

Friday, November 2nd, 2018 and Friday, December 14th, 2018

11 am – 6 pm

Open to all

 

Storefront’s current exhibition Subculture: Microbial Metrics and the Multi-Species City brings together work in biology, data science, material science to to reframe the value of microbial communities found in urban spaces. As an active laboratory for metagenomic sequencing, the gallery space explores the invisible ecologies and genetic landscapes of the built environment through the practice and study of genetic material collected directly from environmental samples across New York City.

 

On two Fridays this fall, the laboratory will be active and open to all to view. Dr. Elizabeth Hénaff, a computational biologist and one of the exhibition collaborators, will conduct the second and third rounds of DNA sequencing as part of the ongoing experiment.

 

Stop by at any point during these two Fridays to learn more about the process from Dr. Hénaff and Storefront’s staff.

 

Bioinformatics for Environmental Metagenomics 101: Introduction to DNA Sequencing and Analysis

With Dr. Elizabeth Hénaff

Saturday, November 10th, 2018

97 Kenmare Street

2 – 4 pm

RSVP required. Capacity capped at 20. If you are interested in attending, please email subculture@storefrontnews.org with a brief statement about your relevant interests and background.

 

What is the DNA of the city?

 

Utilizing technological innovations of web-based, open source, and small-scale genetic sequencing devices, it is possible to collect, extract, sequence, and analyze microbial life of our immediate environments through novel and rapidly evolving techniques.

 

Bioinformatics for Environmental Metagenomics 101: Introduction to DNA Sequencing and Analysis, led by Dr. Elizabeth Hénaff, provides an introduction to the molecular structure of DNA through the basics of transcription and translation. Participants will learn about the current methods of “reading” sequences through the use of both short- and long- read DNA sequencing technologies. Using a sample dataset that includes metagenomic data from Subculture, participants will employ online tools to perform sequence alignments and searches, gaining an understanding of the applications and interpretations of this data for environmental metagenomics.

 

As as part of Subculture (and for use in this workshop), genetic material has been extracted from the bio-receptive wooden tiles installed on Storefront’s façade for analysis and interpretation. The materials, exposed directly to their environments, undergo a process designed to indicate the metabolic functions of the geographically-specific microbiome found on Kenmare Street. In this 101 workshop, participants will have the opportunity learn about the underlying principles and processes of the ongoing experiment at Storefront.

 

Interrogation Series: Across Scales and Species will follow Bioinformatics for Environmental Metagenomics 101; for more information, see HERE.

 

Requirements for participants for 101:

– Laptop computer with a web browser. Tablet use is possible but not recommended.

 

Bioinformatics for Environmental Metagenomics 202: Interpreting the Microbiome for Design

With Dr. Elizabeth Hénaff and Blacki Migliozzi

Saturday, December 15th, 2018

97 Kenmare Street

1 – 4 pm

RSVP required. Capacity capped at 10. If you are interested in attending please email subculture@storefrontnews.org with a brief statement about your relevant interests and background.

 

We are increasingly aware of the invisible and ubiquitous microbial component of our lives – in and on our bodies and in our environments. But, how do we actually measure these? What if we want to determine which bacteria are living around us?

 

In Bioinformatics for Environmental Metagenomics 202: Interpreting the Microbiome for Design, participants will learn the methods for identifying microbial species with DNA sequencing data, understand their functions, and explore their implications for urban design decisions. The workshop will utilize the dataset acquired for Subculture: Microbial Metrics and the Multi-Species City. Participants will learn about file formats used for sequencing data and how to manipulate them, and will gain hands-on experience with computational tools used to identify bacterial species, their genes, and methods for visualizing the results that are generated.

 

Requirements for participants for 202:

– Laptop computer with a UNIX-based operating system. Tablet use is not possible.

 

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SUPPORT

Subculture: Microbial Metrics and the Multi-Species City is supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.
 

Pro-bono and institutional support for this exhibition is kindly provided by Evan Eisman Company and the Hénaff Lab at NYU Tandon School of Engineering.

 
Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.
 
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