Guided Tour: The Absolute Restoration of All Things

Wednesday, May 4th, 2022
6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY
 

RSVPs are kindly encouraged for this event.

 
 
 

Join us for a guided tour with artist Miguel Fernández de Castro and anthropologist Natalia Mendoza as they walk us through their exhibition The Absolute Restoration of All Things at Storefront. 

 

The exhibition unfolds from a 2014 lawsuit that shut down the operations of a gold mine in the Sonoran Desert in the northwest of Mexico. This groundbreaking case, brought to court by the “ejidatarios” (communal land holders) of the mining site claiming that their territory was illegally occupied and exploited, ruled that the mining company was “obliged to fully restore the ecosystem that prevailed in this place, with its hills, mountains, waters, air, flora, and fauna that existed before.”

 

For the event, Fernández de Castro and Mendoza will contextualize the objects on display to hone in on land rights and the limits of the legal language that is meant to protect it. Concepts like the “ejido”, and other forces unique to this territory, will be discussed. 

 

About the Exhibition

The Absolute Restoration of All Things was commissioned by Storefront for Art and Architecture and presents a new film, a sculpture, a photomural, diagrams, and objects from the mining site. Together, these works present a panoramic picture of the expansive devastation caused by the mining industry, alongside the unattainable legal verdict that aims to restore this particular part of the Sonoran Desert.
 
RSVP for the event here.
 
Read more about the exhibition here.
 
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Support
The Absolute Restoration of All Things is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and Fundación Jumex.
 
Building Cycles has been made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, as well as from DS+R; KPF; Steven Holl Architects; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

The Absolute Restoration of All Things

The Absolute Restoration of All Things
By Miguel Fernández de Castro & Natalia Mendoza
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Exhibition Opening:
Friday, April 8th from 6:30–8:30 pm [RSVP]

 

Gallery Hours:
Wednesdays – Saturdays, 12-6 pm
April 8th–July 30th, 2022

 

#absoluterestoration  @miguelfernandezdecastro  @mendozarockwell   @storefrontnyc  

 

In the middle of the vast Sonoran desert in the northwest of Mexico, a sculpture sits within the deep pit of a decommissioned gold mine. Made on-site with soil from the pit, the sculpture is shaped as a perfect cube. Beside it sits a silver plaque that reads:

 

Between 2010 and 2013, the Penmont Mining company illegally extracted 236,709 ounces of gold, according to its own reports. To do this, they blew up and moved 10,833,527 tons of stone. 

 

The decision of the Unitary Agrarian Court of the 28th District, issued on December 8th, 2014, obliges Penmont to return the extracted gold, which would take the shape of a 70 x 70 x 70 centimeter cube and would have a value of 436 million dollars. 

Ejido El Bao

February 2022

 

The contrast in scales between the small volume of the sculpture in relation to the massive open pit clearly showcases the environmental damage caused by the mining industry. This sculpture and its accompanying plaque function as an anti-monument to the site’s dispossession. They are part of the exhibition The Absolute Restoration of All Things by artist Miguel Fernández de Castro and anthropologist Natalia Mendoza at Storefront for Art and Architecture. 

 

For the last five years, Fernández de Castro and Mendoza—who are based in the Sonoran Desert—have been researching the 2014 court case that shut down Penmont’s mining operations. The lawsuit was brought to court by the “ejidatarios” (communal land holders) of the mining site, who claimed that their territory was illegally occupied and exploited, causing an irrevocable environmental impact on their land. In addition to the return of the extracted gold, the court ruled that Penmont Mining is “obliged to fully restore the ecosystem that prevailed in this place, with its hills, mountains, waters, air, flora, and fauna that existed before.” Not only has Penmont Mining not complied with the court ruling, but the ejidatarios continue to suffer from arbitrary imprisonment, harassment, and forced disappearance in a context of intertwined state and criminal violence. 

 

The Absolute Restoration of All Things departs from the impossibility of this historic legal verdict to explore the issue of land rights and the limits of the legal language that protects it. 

 

The exhibition at Storefront presents newly commissioned works by Fernández de Castro and Mendoza that unpack the court case, including a film, diagrams, a photo mural, and objects from the mine. The formwork used to create the rammed earth sculpture inside the open pit is also included, allowing the viewer to grasp the scale and connect the two sites. Together, these works present a panoramic picture of the expansive devastation caused by the mining industry, alongside the unattainable legal verdict that aims to restore this particular part of the Sonoran Desert.

 

RSVP for the public opening here.

 

About the Artist

Miguel Fernández de Castro (b. 1986, Sonora, Mexico) is a visual artist based in the Sonora-Arizona borderlands. Through photography, video, sculpture, and writing, his work examines how extractive and criminal economies materially transform a territory while looking at the historical ties between environmental catastrophe, smuggling routes, and forced disappearance. In Mexico, his work has been shown at Museo Jumex, Casa del Lago, and Museo de Arte Moderno. Internationally he’s presented work at Frac Centre-Val de Loire (France), Spazio Veda (Italy), Wren Library (UK), Museo Artium (Spain), Ashkal Alwan (Lebanon), among others. His film Grammar of Gates was selected by Ballroom Marfa to be for the Artists’ Film International program at Whitechapel Gallery in London. Since 2018 he has collaborated with multiple search groups documenting mass graves on both sides of the Mexico-US border.

 

​​Natalia Mendoza, (b. 1981, Mexico City, Mexico) is a researcher and essayist based between New York and Sonora, Mexico. She obtained a PhD in anthropology from Columbia University and joined Fordham University as an assistant professor. She has conducted extensive ethnographic research in the region of Sonora-Arizona. Her work examines the convergence of legal and illegal economies, and the overlaps between state and criminal violence in the US-Mexico borderlands. In 2020, Natalia Mendoza won the “José Revueltas-INBA National Essay Award” for her collection of essays on disappearance, funerary rituals, and political imagination.

 

Building Cycles

The Absolute Restoration of All Things is presented as part of Building Cycles, Storefront’s ongoing curatorial program that examines building as both a place and a process. The Absolute Restoration of All Things follows five exhibitions in the cycle, Aquí­ vive gente, Ministry for All,  Arabesque, and Something Broke, and The Great Ruins of Saturn.

 

 

Credits

The Absolute Restoration of All Things by Miguel Fernández de Castro & Natalia Mendoza.  Graphic design by Estudio Herrera. Organized by Storefront for Art and Architecture, 2022.

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture Team:

José Esparza Chong Cuy, Executive Director and Chief Curator

Jinny Khanduja, Deputy Director

Eduardo Meneses, Gallery and Operations Manager

 

Support

The Absolute Restoration of All Things is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and Fundación Jumex. The opening is supported by Los Mariscos and Mal Mezcal.

 

Building Cycles has been made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, as well as from DS+R; KPF; Steven Holl Architects; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

   

   

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Form Follows Feeling

Tuesday, March 15th, 2022

6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Suchi Reddy in conversation with Beatrice Galilee

On the occasion of the launch of Form Follows Feeling by Suchi Reddy

 

[RSVP]  

 

Please note that in accordance with New York State regulations, proof of vaccination will be required to enter the gallery space.

 

#sfevents @reddymadedesign  @storefrontnyc

 

Join us for an event to celebrate the launch of Form Follows Feeling by Suchi Reddy, published on the occasion of Reddy’s Plym Distinguished Visiting Professorship at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign School of Architecture. The book presents a selection of projects by Reddy’s firm Reddymade and student work from the studio co-taught with host and professor Kevin Erickson. It includes contributions by Alberto Pérez-Gómez, Beatrice Galilee, Isolde Brielmaier, LionHeart, Susan Magsamen, and Michael Spicher. 

 

For the event, Reddy will engage in conversation with curator and critic Beatrice Galilee, with introductory remarks by Kevin Erickson. A new artistic video collaboration with poet, artist, and writer LionHeart will also debut at the event, as an extension of his series of spatial poems written in response to the work of Suchi Reddy. 

 

Form Follows Feeling is edited by Julia van den Hout of Original Copy, designed by Natasha Jen of Pentagram, published by the University of Illinois School of Architecture, and printed in New York by Cosmos Communications. A limited number of copies will be provided to those who attend the event.

 

This event is free and open to the public. RSVPs are encouraged.

 

Suchi Reddy founded Reddymade Architecture and Design in 2002. Since its inception, the firm has been lauded for its formal experimentation, its imaginative use of color, and passion for innovative materials. Based in New York, the firm’s practice spans the fields of architecture, design, installation art, and sculpture. Through its diverse portfolio of projects, Reddymade utilizes a human-centric approach to design, dedicated to celebrating diversity and equality, as well as addressing the economic, social, environmental and cultural impacts of her work on both the user and the planet.

 

Reddy sits on the boards of the Design Trust for Public Space, Storefront for Art and Architecture, and Madame Architect; and she is a member of the Dean’s Board of Advisors at University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture. She was appointed the Plym Distinguished Professor at the University of Illinois School of Architecture, Urbana-Champaign for the Fall 2019 semester. Reddy has presented and lectured on the firm’s work at numerous venues including The Salk Institute for the Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture’s 2018 conference, University of Illinois, and University of Wisconsin.

 

Beatrice Galilee is a curator, critic and cultural consultant specializing in the field of contemporary architecture and design. She is internationally recognised for her worldwide experience in curating, designing and conceiving original and dynamic city-wide biennales, museum exhibitions, installations, conferences, events and publications, bringing together the world’s most important institutions with cutting edge practitioners. Her research and writing has been published in journals, newspapers and magazines.

 

She is co-founder and creative director of The World Around, a new platform for critical architectural discourse. Between 2014-2019 was the first curator of architecture and design at The Metropolitan Museum of Art where she curated exhibitions and site-specific installations with artists and architects including Wolfgang Tillmans, Cornelia Parker, Luisa Lambri, Bas Princen and Adrian Villar Rojas and initiated the annual conference “A Year of Architecture in a Day”. She has led city-wide exhibitions and biennales in Lisbon, Shenzhen, Gwangju, Milan, Ordos, London, and New York. She received a BSc in Architecture from University of Bath, an MSc in Architectural History from Bartlett UCL and is currently a PhD candidate at the Royal College of Art.

The Great Ruins of Saturn

 
The Great Ruins of Saturn
By Alvaro Urbano
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Exhibition Opening:
Saturday, December 4th from 5-7 pm [RSVP]
Please note that the public opening is free and all are welcome to attend. Proof of vaccination will be required to enter the gallery space.

 

Gallery Hours:
Wednesdays – Saturdays, 12-6 pm
December 8th, 2021 – February 26th, 2022
(Closed December 23rd – January 1st)

 

#greatruinsofsaturn     @alvaro_urbano     @storefrontnyc   

 

“There’s a great, big, beautiful tomorrow and it’s just a dream away!”
Song lyrics for the Carousel of Progress (1964)
by Richard & Robert Sherman, commissioned by Walt Disney

 

“Man’s Achievements on a Shrinking Globe in an Expanding Universe” stated the dedication of the 1964 New York World’s Fair, held at Flushing Meadows Corona Park – once a sprawling ash dump in the heart of the borough of Queens.

 

The 650-acre fair site was populated by hundreds of temporary structures and attended by 51 million people. Amidst all the attractions, the colossal New York State Pavilion, with its space age design and its boasting rights as the largest and tallest pavilion at the fair, embodied the spectacle of “man’s achievements” (or of those by certain men, such as Governor Nelson Rockefeller, World’s Fair President Robert Moses, and pavilion architect Philip Johnson).

 

57 years later, this once colorful symbol that sought to project the ultimate vision of progress, optimism, and power lies largely dormant. Its concrete vestige now casts shadows upon its surroundings…and its original vision. While other structures from the fair have been repurposed, rehabilitated, and moved to various sites, the New York State Pavilion, with its central structure known as the Tent of Tomorrow, still awaits its grand departure.

 

The Great Ruins of Saturn by artist Alvaro Urbano speculates upon its unknown future. Through the technique of shadow puppetry, Urbano presents a film and an installation that playfully and satirically resurface stories from the Tent of Tomorrow and its politically and socially charged past. Urbano’s work situates the neglected pavilion in a theater occupied by a cast of inanimate characters, bringing them to life in order to question both obsolete and contemporary notions of growth and development.

 

Untethered from its original site, the building relinquishes the bright lights of achievement and instead seeks an otherworldly ending. In the process, it escapes the shadows formed by the still-thriving promises of a techno-capitalist future.

 

RSVP for the public opening here.

 

About the Artist

Alvaro Urbano (b. 1983, Madrid, Spain) is a visual artist based in Berlin. He studied at the Escuela Técnica Superior de Madrid (ETSAM) and the Institut für Raumexperimente of the Universität der Künste in Berlin. He is currently a professor at the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Urbano’s practice embraces a variety of media, from performance to spatial installations that unfold throughout an experimental process. Often using architecture, theatre, and heterotopia as points of departure, his work invites dialogue in newly conceived environments – exposing conflicts between reality and fiction that redefine and render time-space based situations. Recently, his work has explored and researched the futures of abandoned and vacant World’s Fair pavilions, as in his 2020 show The Awakening at La Casa Encendida (Madrid), which animated the 1958 Spanish Pavilion in Brussels. The Great Ruins of Saturn is Urbano’s first solo exhibition in the U.S.

 

Building Cycles

The Great Ruins of Saturn is presented as part of Building Cycles, Storefront’s ongoing curatorial program that examines building as both a place and a process. The Great Ruins of Saturn follows four exhibitions in the cycle, Aquí­ vive gente, Ministry for All,  Arabesque, and Something Broke.

 

 

Credits

The Great Ruins of Saturn by Alvaro Urbano. Graphic design by Estudio Herrera. Organized by Storefront for Art and Architecture, 2021.

 

Film Credits:
Artist: Alvaro Urbano
Puppeteers and Scenography: Victor Ame Navarro, Yao Liao, Luli Pérez, and Elena Peters
Music: Coeval
Editing: Joji Koyama
Graphic Design: Estudio Herrera
Commissioned by: Storefront for Art and Architecture with the collaboration of Acción Cultural Española, AC/E

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture Team:

José Esparza Chong Cuy, Executive Director & Chief Curator

Jinny Khanduja, Deputy Director

Eduardo Meneses, Gallery and Operations Manager

 

Support

The Great Ruins of Saturn is presented in collaboration with Acción Cultural Española (AC/E), as well as with the support of Silman, ChertLüdde, Travesía Cuatro, and Sotheby’s. Lighting design is supported by L’Observatoire International, with contributions from Lutron / KETRA, Lumenture, and O’Blaney Rinker Associates.

 

Building Cycles has been made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, as well as from DS+R; KPF; Steven Holl Architects; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

          

 

           

 

                       

 

 

             

 

 

         

 

 

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Closing Event: Something Broke

Friday, November 5th, 2021
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY
Silkscreen Station: 4 – 7 pm ET
Virtual Performance by Mariela Scafati: 4:30 pm ET
 
$25 requested donation per attendee; free for members of Storefront. Tote bags and t-shirts will be provided; guests can also bring their own (light colored, pre-ironed) items to print. Storefront’s membership program allows us to remain open and is crucial to our ability to present new work in the gallery space and beyond.
 
Please note that in accordance with New York State regulations, proof of vaccination will be required to enter the gallery space.
 
#somethingbroke   #algoserompio   @scafatiscafati   @storefrontnyc
 
 
Join us next Friday for an event to mark the closing of Something Broke: 2011–Windows–2021 by Mariela Scafati.
 
Drawing upon the artist’s installation at Storefront as well as her work as one of the founders of Serigrafistas Queer (Queer Silkscreeners), attendees are invited to learn the method of silkscreening in order to print on t-shirts and tote bags with an original design by Scafati (pictured above). T-shirts and tote bags will be provided by Storefront for the event, and guests can also bring their own (light-colored and ironed) cloth items to print on. At 4:30 pm, a live virtual performance, Kamishibai Windows (presented by the artist in person from ArteBA in Buenos Aires) will be screened from inside the gallery space and on Storefront’s instagram at @storefrontnyc.
 
About the Exhibition
“A self portrait in reds and pinks,” offers Scafati. Something Broke is a diary of the personal and the collective, in the form of paintings that are both poems and protest signs. It’s a window into the artist’s body as a painter, a teacher, an activist, a queer silkscreener, and – as of recently – a mother. It’s a spectrum of visceral crimsons.
 
These reds and pinks emerge from the artist’s bonds of affection through activism, and from an entanglement of art, politics, and life. They are windows that frame the subjectivities of a body that seeks to inhabit other ways of being.
 
Read more about the exhibition here.
 
RSVP for the event here. Please note that space is limited and entry at the door will be on a first come, first served basis. For non-members: to confirm your attendance, you can make the requested donation or renew/join our membership program in advance of the event.
 
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Support
 
With special thanks to Diego Bianchi, curator of the performance program at ArteBA 21.
 
The silkscreen printing station at this event supports Works in Progress, a nonprofit organization that provides printing services and education.
 
Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from BKSK; DS+R; KPF; Steven Holl Architects; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.
 
 

Sandfuture

Tuesday, September 21st, 2021

6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

97 Kenmare Street, New York

 

Justin Beal in conversation with Felicity Scott

On the occasion of the launch of Sandfuture by Justin Beal

 

[RSVP]  

 

Please note that in accordance with New York State regulations, proof of vaccination will be required to enter the gallery space.

 

#sfevents     @thejustinbeal     @storefrontnyc

 

Architect Minoru Yamasaki (1912–1986) remains on the margins of history despite the enormous influence of his work on American architecture and society. That Yamasaki’s most famous projects—the Pruitt-Igoe apartments in St. Louis and the original World Trade Center in New York—were both destroyed on national television, thirty years apart, makes his relative obscurity all the more remarkable.

 

Sandfuture by Justin Beal is a work of literary non-fiction that recounts the life and work of Minoru Yamasaki, told through the eyes of a contemporary artist who considers how objects gain meaning and how (and for whom) architectural history is written.

 

New York City changes drastically after a decade bracketed by terrorism and natural disaster. From the central thread of Yamasaki’s life, Sandfuture spirals outward to include reflections on a wide range of subjects, from the figure of the architect in literature and film and transformations in the contemporary art market to the perils of sick buildings and the broader social and political implications of how, and for whom, cities are built. 

 

Join us for an event with artist and author Justin Beal, in conversation with scholar Felicity Scott, to celebrate the launch of the book. This event is free and open to the public. RSVPs are encouraged.

 

Justin Beal is an artist with an extensive exhibition history in the United States and Europe. He graduated from Yale University with a degree in architecture and continued his studies at the Whitney Independent Study Program and the University of Southern California. His work has been reviewed in the New York Times, the New Yorker, Artforum, Frieze, Art in America, and the Los Angeles Times and is included in the permanent collections of the Albright Knox Museum, the Hammer Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles. Beal teaches at Hunter College. Sandfuture is his first book.

 

Felicity D. Scott is Professor of Architecture, Director of the PhD program in Architecture (History and Theory), and Co-Director of the program in Critical, Curatorial and Conceptual Practices in Architecture (CCCP) at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, Columbia University. Her work as a historian and theorist focuses on articulating genealogies of political and theoretical engagement with questions of techno-scientific, environmental, and geopolitical transformation within modern and contemporary architecture, art, and media, as well as upon the discourses, institutions and social movements that have shaped and defined these disciplines, sometimes evidently, sometimes less so.

Algo se rompió

 
Information about the exhibition in English here.
 

Algo se rompió: 2011–Windows–2021
Mariela Scafati
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Inauguración:
Jueves 29 de julio, de 6 a 8 pm [RSVP]

 

Horas de la galería:
De miércoles a sábados, de 12 a 6 pm
29 de julio-6 de noviembre de 2021

 

#algoserompio  #somethingbroke  @scafatiscafati  @storefrontnyc   

 

“El cuerpo, barricada fluída”, afirma uno de los 60 afiches monocromáticos pintados a mano por Mariela Scafati en tonos que van del rojo militante al rosa salvaje. Para esta instalación, Scafati regresa a 2011, cuando presentó una exposición titulada Windows en Buenos Aires. Diez años después, la artista revisita y amplía este cuerpo de trabajo, recontextualizando la obra tras una década intermedia de activismos transfeministas que han tenido un impacto intenso en ella y en quienes la rodean. “No sé si llego con palabras a definir esos diez años, posiblemente sí, con los colores”.

 

“Un autorretrato en rojos y rosas”, ofrece Scafati a modo de descripción. Algo se rompió es un diario de lo personal y lo colectivo en forma de pinturas que son a la vez poemas y carteles de protesta. Es una ventana al cuerpo de la artista como pintora, docente, activista, serigrafista queer y, recientemente, como madre. Es un espectro de carmesíes viscerales.

 

Es el color de la solidaridad. “Felicidad infinita en la plaza”, escribió en 2011. Windows se presentó inicialmente durante una acalorada elección presidencial en Argentina y en un momento de gran entusiasmo por el movimiento de los Indignados en contra de la austeridad en España. El trabajo incorpora ideas de sus asambleas, sus modos de organización en espacio público y las estrategias creativas que surgieron de estos esfuerzos, muchos de los cuales fueron heredados de Reclaim the Streets, la Primavera Árabe y otros movimientos sociales globales y locales.

 

Es el color de atención. “Ataques de cariño por tí”, pronunció mientras transmisiones de todo el mundo parecían estar en streaming permanentemente en las ventanas de la pantalla de su laptop. En 2021, al dejar abierta una ventana de su casa, pasó una vecina que le dijo “Avísame si puedo ayudarte en algo.” Este gesto de apoyo se volvió más común que nunca durante la pandemia y lo sigue siendo.

 

Es el color de la audacia. “Sí, se puede. Sonreir, llorar, son parte de lo mismo”, declaró aquella vez con un sentido más despreocupado. Ahora, diez años después, la sensación es distinta. Es un sentido de esperanza mezclada con melancolía, entendiendo que hemos estado aquí antes pero sin estar seguros de lo que sucederá después.

 

Es el color de la desesperación. “Soledad constante, incluso entre la multitud”, recuerda. Ahora, aunque la conectividad se expande a través de WhatsApp y más allá, es difícil escapar de la sensación de aislamiento, como si algo se rompiera en la red que nos une.

 

Estos rojos y rosas surgen de lazos de afecto de la artista a través del activismo y del entrelazamiento de arte, política y vida. Son ventanas que enmarcan las subjetividades de un cuerpo que busca otras formas de ser.

 

Sobra la artista

Mariela Scafati (1973) es pintora, serigrafista queer y docente. Ha vivido y trabajado en Buenos Aires desde 1997. En el 2000, tuvo lugar su primera muestra individual en la galería Belleza y felicidad en Buenos Aires. Una de sus últimas exposiciones colectivas, Transformación, se presentó en el Museo Nacional de Grabado de Argentina y en la onceava Bienal de Berlín. Scafati ha participado en proyectos colectivos y colaborativos vinculados a la serigrafía, la educación, la radio y el teatro. Desde 2007, ha sido integrante de Serigrafistas Queer, un no-grupo que convoca a encuentros para crear consignas que están impresos en camisetas para usar en las marchas del orgullo LGBTTTIQ+, manifestaciones feministas, escuelas, hospitales, museos y asambleas. Desde 2013, ha sido parte de Cromoactivismo, un grupo que usa el color para intervenir poéticamente y transversalmente en los acontecimientos políticos y sociales. En 2020, se sumó a un colectivo que está construyendo la Huerta Agroecológica Transfeminista en Buenos Aires.

 

Building Cycles

Algo se rompió se presenta como parte de Building Cycles, un programa curatorial de Storefront que examina “building” como lugar y proceso. Algo se rompió sigue a tres exposiciones del ciclo, Aquí­ vive gente, Ministry for All, y Arabesque.

 

 

Créditos

Algo se rompió: 2011–Windows–2021 por Mariela Scafati. Diseño gráfico por Julián Solís Morales. Organizado por Storefront for Art and Architecture, 2021.

 

Un agradecimiento especial a Isla Flotante.

 

Equipo de Storefront for Art and Architecture:

José Esparza Chong Cuy, Director ejecutivo y curador en jefe

Jinny Khanduja, Subdirectora

Eduardo Meneses, Manager de galería y operaciones

 

Apoyo

Building Cycles ha sido posible gracias al apoyo de la Fundación Graham, así como de BKSK, DS + R; KPF; Steven Holl Architects; el Consejo de las Artes del Estado de Nueva York con el apoyo del Gobernador Andrew Cuomo y la Legislatura del Estado de Nueva York; fondos públicos del Departamento de Asuntos Culturales de la Ciudad de Nueva York en asociación con el Concejo Municipal; y por la Junta Directiva, los miembros y los donantes individuales de Storefront.

 

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Something Broke

 
Información de la exposición en español aquí.
 

Something Broke: 2011–Windows–2021
By Mariela Scafati
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Exhibition Opening:
Thursday, July 29th from 6–8 pm [RSVP]

 

Gallery Hours:
Wednesdays – Saturdays, 12-6 pm
July 29th–November 6th, 2021

 

#somethingbroke  #algoserompio  @scafatiscafati  @storefrontnyc   

 

“The body, fluid barricade,” states one of 60 monochrome posters hand-painted by artist Mariela Scafati in shades that range from militant red to wild pink. For this installation, Scafati reaches back to 2011, when she presented an exhibition entitled Windows in Buenos Aires. Ten years later, she revisits and expands upon this body of work, recontextualizing it in light of the intermediate decade of transfeminist activism that has intensely impacted the artist and those around her. “I don’t know if I can define these ten years with words, but possibly with colors.”

 

“A self portrait in reds and pinks,” offers Scafati by way of description. Something Broke is a diary of the personal and the collective, in the form of paintings that are both poems and protest signs. It’s a window into the artist’s body as a painter, a teacher, an activist, a queer silkscreener, and – as of recently – a mother. It’s a spectrum of visceral crimsons.

 

It’s the color of solidarity. “Infinite happiness on the street,” she wrote in 2011. Windows was initially presented during a heated presidential election in Argentina, and at a time of great enthusiasm for the Indignados Movement against austerity policies in Spain. The work incorporated ideas from the assemblies, modes of organization in public space, and creative strategies that emerged from these efforts, many of which were inherited from Reclaim the Streets, the Arab Spring, and other global and local social movements.

 

It’s the color of attention. “Rush of affection for you,” she pronounced, as broadcasts from around the world seemed to be permanently streaming on the windows of her computer screen. In 2021, upon leaving a window open in her house, a neighbor passed by and said “Let me know if you need anything.” This gesture of support became more common than ever before during the pandemic, and it continues to be.

 

It’s the color of boldness. “Sí se puede. To smile, to cry, they are part of the same,” she declared at the time with a sense of lightheartedness. Now, ten years later, the feeling is different. It’s a sense of hope mixed with melancholy, knowing that we’ve been here before and uncertain what will happen next.

 

It’s the color of despair. “Constant loneliness, even between the crowd,” she remembers. Now, even as connectivity expands through WhatsApp and beyond, it’s hard to escape a feeling of isolation, as if something broke in the network that unites us.

 

These reds and pinks emerge from the artist’s bonds of affection through activism, and from an entanglement of art, politics, and life. They are windows that frame the subjectivities of a body that seeks to inhabit other ways of being.

 

About the Artist

Mariela Scafati (1973) is a painter, queer silkscreener, and teacher. She has lived and worked in Buenos Aires since 1997. In 2000, her first solo show took place at Belleza y felicidad gallery in Buenos Aires. One of her most recent group exhibitions, Transformation, was presented at the National Museum of Engraving in Argentina and at the 11th Berlin Biennial. Scafati has participated in collective and collaborative projects related to screenprinting, education, radio, and theater. Since 2007, she has been a member of Queer Silkscreeners, a non-group that calls meetings to create slogans that are printed on T-shirts for use at LGBTQIA+ pride marches, feminist demonstrations, schools, hospitals, museums, and assemblies. Since 2013, she has been a part of Cromoactivismo, a group that uses color to intervene poetically and transversally in political and social events. In 2020, she joined a collective that is constructing the Transfeminist Agroecological Garden in Buenos Aires.

 

Building Cycles

Something Broke is presented as part of Building Cycles, Storefront’s ongoing curatorial program that examines building as both a place and a process. Something Broke follows three exhibitions in the cycle, Aquí­ vive gente, Ministry for All, and Arabesque.

 

 

Credits

Something Broke: 2011–Windows–2021 by Mariela Scafati. Graphic design by Julián Solís Morales. Organized by Storefront for Art and Architecture, 2021.

 

A special thanks to Isla Flotante.

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture Team:

José Esparza Chong Cuy, Executive Director and Chief Curator

Jinny Khanduja, Deputy Director

Eduardo Meneses, Gallery and Operations Manager

 

Support

Building Cycles has been made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, as well as from BKSK, DS+R; KPF; Steven Holl Architects; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

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Live Performance: A Long Evening with Christian Nyampeta

Wednesday, May 26th, 2021

7:00 pm – 9:00 pm (performance starts at sunset)

97 Kenmare Street, New York

 

[RSVP]    [About the Project]

 

#sfevents     #alongevening      @christiannyampeta      @storefrontnyc

 

Join us for a live performance by artist Christian Nyampeta to conclude his extended meta-concert at Storefront for Art and Architecture, A Long Evening with Christian Nyampeta.

 

Learn more about the project and see photos here and below.

 

About the Project

A year of social distancing has made time, touch, and gesture elusive. The spaces people inhabit together are increasingly temporal and psychological, rather than physical.

 

This extended meta-concert at Storefront for Art and Architecture spatializes artist Christian Nyampeta’s recent album, An Evening with Christian Nyampeta. Over the course of the last decade, Nyampeta has been making musical experiments as a way to commemorate the shifts caused by major events: the Fukushima nuclear disaster, police shootings, the intensification of tyrannical regimes, and the current pandemic, to name a few. Each track emerges from Nyampeta’s intimate act of seeking the company of artists, musicians, theorists, and other figures. He mixes their ideas with his own and translates these allusive collaborations into sonic compositions. In doing so, he imbues them with what he calls a sociography of emotions, collectivizing personal experiences into structures of feelings.

 

A Long Evening with Christian Nyampeta, like its namesake album, is presented during a brief hiatus in the regular course of operating, born as an impromptu act of solidarity. It stretches that brief period of time that sits between day and night, between public and private, between outside and inside, between what the world is and what it could be. Offering a time zone of respite from the exhaustion, loss, grief, and conflict of our current era, it instead imagines a moment of belonging, joy, generosity, and creation in the face of an ever challenging world. In the process, Nyampeta asks a crucial question that provokes a more hopeful future: how do we rest together? 

 

This event is open to all who would like to attend. Please RSVP here.

A Long Evening with Christian Nyampeta

A Long Evening

with Christian Nyampeta

Begins April 8th, 2021 

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Begins: Thursday, April 8th from 6-8 pm [RSVP]

Ongoing: Wednesday – Saturday from 12-5 pm until May 26th, 2021

Please note that masks are required for entry, and social distancing protocols apply.

 

#alongevening      @christiannyampeta       @storefrontnyc

 

A year of social distancing has made time, touch, and gesture elusive. The spaces people inhabit together are increasingly temporal and psychological, rather than physical.

 

This extended meta-concert at Storefront for Art and Architecture spatializes artist Christian Nyampeta’s recent album, An Evening with Christian Nyampeta. Over the course of the last decade, Nyampeta has been making musical experiments as a way to commemorate the shifts caused by major events: the Fukushima nuclear disaster, police shootings, the intensification of tyrannical regimes, and the current pandemic, to name a few. Each track emerges from Nyampeta’s intimate act of seeking the company of artists, musicians, theorists, and other figures. He mixes their ideas with his own and translates these allusive collaborations into sonic compositions. In doing so, he imbues them with what he calls a sociography of emotions, collectivizing personal experiences into structures of feelings.

 

A Long Evening with Christian Nyampeta, like its namesake album, is presented during a brief hiatus in the regular course of operating, born as an impromptu act of solidarity. It stretches that brief period of time that sits between day and night, between public and private, between outside and inside, between what the world is and what it could be. Offering a time zone of respite from the exhaustion, loss, grief, and conflict of our current era, it instead imagines a moment of belonging, joy, generosity, and creation in the face of an ever challenging world. In the process, Nyampeta asks a crucial question that provokes a more hopeful future: how do we rest together? 

 

About the Artist

Christian Nyampeta lives nearby Storefront, from where he organizes programs, exhibitions, screenings, performances, and pedagogical experiments in New York, the Netherlands, London, and beyond. His 2018 film Sometimes It Was Beautiful will be premiered in the US at the Guggenheim Museum on April 30th, 2021 in a solo exhibition curated by Xiaoyu Weng.

 

On Maintenance

A Long Evening is presented as part of On Maintenance, Storefront’s year-long interim program in the midst of the global pandemic. The program introduces an interjection and a moment of pause in our previously scheduled programming to address aspects of maintenance and care, exploring what it means to both sustain and rehaul our spaces, our social and political systems, and our bodies and minds.

 

Credits

A Long Evening with Christian Nyampeta. Organized by Storefront for Art and Architecture, 2021. 

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture Team

José Esparza Chong Cuy, Executive Director & Chief Curator

Jinny Khanduja, Deputy Director

Jessica Kwok, Gallery and Operations Manager

 

Support      

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from BKSK; DS+R; KPF; Steven Holl Architects; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

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