On the Ground: Ilana Harris-Babou

 

On the Ground: Ilana Harris-Babou
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Exhibition Opening:
Saturday, September 9th

 

From September 9th to December 16th, we will present the work of artist Ilana Harris-Babou, an exhibition that reflects on storefronts that engage alternative ways of teaching and learning in the neighborhoods in Central Brooklyn where she grew up. From a cooperatively-run alternative preschool to an afrocentric martial arts space, Harris-Babou unpacks how the pedagogical use of storefronts have become an essential artery to share knowledge within the rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods of Crown Heights, Wingate, Flatbush, and their shifting demographics.

 

About the Artist

 

Ilana Harris-Babou’s work is interdisciplinary; spanning sculpture and installation, and grounded in video. She speaks the aspirational language of consumer culture and uses humor to digest painful realities. Her work confronts the contradictions of the American Dream: the ever-unreliable notion that hard work will lead to upward mobility and economic freedom. She has exhibited her work internationally, with recent survey exhibitions at Kunsthaus Hamburg & the ICA Chattanooga. Other venues include The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, USA; The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, USA; The High Line; New York, USA; West Space, Melbourne, and Warehouse421, Abu Dhabi, UAE.

 

On the Ground
On the Ground is a year-long research project and exhibition series about New York City’s ground floor. Through a close look at the urban typology of the storefront, this expansive endeavor presents newly commissioned artistic explorations and dialogues about the heterogeneous threshold between public and private space throughout 2023. The project will unfold through three exhibitions, a radio show, an open call, a public program, and a thematic reader. 

 

Credits

Graphic design by Estudio Herrera 

Photography by PJ Rountree

 

Support
Storefront’s On the Ground program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

 

On the Ground: Francisca Benítez

 

On the Ground: Francisca Benítez

97 Kenmare St. New York, NY

 

Exhibition Opening:
Saturday, June 10th

 

From June 10th through August 19th, we will present an exhibition by artist Francisca Benítez and her explorations on the city through her work on performance and the politics of space. The exhibition will explore Benítez’s practice in relation to her participation in the defense of public space, including her engagement with groups such as Art Against Displacement, Chinatown Working Group, East River Park Action, and the Stop Shopping Choir. The latter currently occupies the storefront of a former bank at 36 Avenue C in the East Village, which has been transformed into the Earth Church, performing services on Sundays. This exhibition acts as an interlocutor between this site and Storefront’s gallery.

 

About the Artist

 

Francisca Benítez is an artist born in Chile in 1974, living and working in New York since 1998. Her art practice explores relations between space, politics, and language, being closely linked to the places where she lives and the communities she interacts with. Her videos, photographs, performances, and drawings are shown internationally. Recent exhibitions include: Riego at Die ecke, Santiago; In Support at The Kitchen, New York; New/Now at the New Britain Museum of American Art, CT; Uprisings at the Jeu de Paume, Paris; Much wider than a line at SITE Santa Fe, NM. She graduated as an architect from Universidad de Chile (1998) and Master in Fine Arts from Hunter College of the City University of New York (2007). She is an alto singer in the Stop Shopping Choir, an anti-capitalist direct action performance group based in New York City.

 

On the Ground
On the Ground is a year-long research project and exhibition series about New York City’s ground floor. Through a close look at the urban typology of the storefront, this expansive endeavor presents newly commissioned artistic explorations and dialogues about the heterogeneous threshold between public and private space throughout 2023. The project will unfold through three exhibitions, a radio show, an open call, a public program, and a thematic reader. 

 

Credits

Graphic design by Estudio Herrera 

Photography by PJ Rountree 

 

Support
Storefront’s On the Ground program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

On the Ground: Canal Street Research Association

 

New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Exhibition Opening:
Wednesday, March 1st

 

From March 1st through May 20th, we will open with an exhibition by Canal Street Research Association, a fictional office of the poetic research collective Shanzhai Lyric. Titled New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original, the exhibition will explore shanzhai methodologies such as mimicking, redistribution of resources, and parody to create a portrait of New Land Plaza, a former marble storage facility turned mini mall on Canal Street that was the site of the infamous Bloomberg “Counterfeit Triangle” bust of 2008.

 

About the Artists

 

Shanzhai Lyric take inspiration from 山寨 (shanzhai or counterfeit) goods to examine how bootlegs use mimicry, hybridity, and permutation to both revel in and reveal the artifice of global hierarchies. In 2020, Shanzhai Lyric founded the fictional office entity Canal Street Research Association in an empty storefront on Canal Street, New York’s counterfeit epicenter. Delving into the cultural and material ecologies of the street and its long history as a site that probes the limits of ownership and authorship, the association repurposes underused real estate as spaces for gathering ephemeral histories, mapping local lore, and tracing the flows and fissures of capital. A microcosm of global trade routes, Canal Street has long held allure for generations of artists to occupy this zone of exchange where high meets low, art meets commerce, original meets copy. Canal Street Research Association speculates new modes of inhabiting this complex interplay of hustles.

 

On the Ground
On the Ground is a year-long research project and exhibition series about New York City’s ground floor. Through a close look at the urban typology of the storefront, this expansive endeavor presents newly commissioned artistic explorations and dialogues about the heterogeneous threshold between public and private space throughout 2023. The project will unfold through three exhibitions, a radio show, an open call, a public program, and a thematic reader. 

 

Credits

Graphic design by Estudio Herrera 

Photography by PJ Rountree 

 

Support
Storefront’s On the Ground program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

On the Ground

 

On the Ground is a year-long research project and exhibition series about New York City’s ground floor. Through a close look at the urban typology of the storefront, this expansive endeavor presents newly commissioned artistic explorations and dialogues about the critical role storefronts play in shaping public life. The project will unfold through three exhibitions, a radio show, an open call, a public program, and a thematic reader. 

 

Informed by Storefront for Art and Architecture’s peculiar relationship with the sidewalk, On the Ground reflects on the critical role storefronts play in shaping public life. While empty storefronts have been ubiquitous in the city long before the pandemic, the impact of the last two years has seen an even greater proliferation of ground floor vacancies which has altered the urban fabric, and in doing so, the experience of moving through the city.

 

This themed series looks at how ground floor retail spaces are markers of social, political, and economic transformation. Both inside and on the sidewalk, social infrastructures are set in motion (and sustained) on the ground floor of cities. Retail establishments sit at the intersection of a cultural ecosystem underpinned by local merchants, developers, supply chains, local governments, and ultimately, an amalgam of individual interests and collective identities. On the Ground invites artists, architects, designers, writers, scholars, and the public at large to engage with the unique stories of the storefronts that give identity to New York City’s changing built environment.
 
The threat to these evanescent urban spaces is not easily untangled. Small business storefronts, especially in a “post-pandemic” condition, are signs of economic dissonance. The voids visible by their vacancies across the city are evidence of a real and symbolic rise in eviction. Booming real estate markets and speculative rent increases are effectively decimating this mode of social resilience. Furthermore, commercial displacement is experienced differently across neighborhoods, having disproportionate effects on various socioeconomic and racial demographics. A focused study on storefronts is also a way to explore the spatial challenges of the rise in online consumption that has reshaped the street, threatening brick-and-mortar retail while inundating neighborhoods with delivery vehicles.  
 
On the Ground probes how this fragile urban form can enable carescapes within diverse communities, providing refuge and belonging by maintaining an intimacy of local life.
 

 

On the Ground: Exhibitions
Storefront will present three newly commissioned solo exhibitions from New York-based artists under the framework of On the Ground. Each project will be in dialogue with an off-site ground floor space somewhere in New York City that acts as a launch pad to study these polemics. 
 
From March 1st through May 20th, we will open with an exhibition by Canal Street Research Association, a fictional office of the poetic research collective Shanzhai Lyric. Titled New Land Plaza: You Can’t Beat a New York Original, the exhibition will explore shanzhai methodologies such as mimicking, redistribution of resources, and parody to create a portrait of New Land Plaza, a former marble storage facility turned mini-mall on Canal Street that was the site of the infamous Bloomberg “Counterfeit Triangle” bust of 2008. 
Read more
 
From June 10th through August 19th, we will present an exhibition by artist Francisca Benítez and her explorations of the city through her work on performance and the politics of space. The exhibition will explore Benítez’s practice in relation to her participation in the defense of public space, including her engagement with groups such as Art Against Displacement, Chinatown Working Group, East River Park Action, and the Stop Shopping Choir. The latter currently occupies the storefront of a former bank at 36 Avenue C in the East Village, which has been transformed into the Earth Church, performing services on Sundays. This exhibition acts as an interlocutor between this site and Storefront’s gallery. 
Read more
 
From September 9th to December 16th, we will present the work of artist Ilana Harris-Babou, an exhibition that reflects on storefronts that engage alternative ways of teaching and learning in the neighborhoods in Central Brooklyn where she grew up. From a cooperatively-run alternative preschool to an Afrocentric martial arts space, Harris-Babou unpacks how the pedagogical use of storefronts has become an essential artery to share knowledge within the rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods of Crown Heights, Wingate, Flatbush, and their shifting demographics. 
Read more
 
On the Ground: Open Call
Alongside our exhibitions, we are also launching an open call—a strategy used by Storefront since its early years—to engage a wider public with this theme and serve as a platform for new ideas. The open call will be launched this Spring and invites artists, architects, writers, curators, and creative individuals to submit proposals for a month long exhibition to be presented at Storefront’s gallery in January 2024. The selected application will receive institutional support, a budget, and a fee to develop and realize the project.  
 
On the Ground: Broadcasts
Throughout the year, Storefront will be collaborating with the independent online radio Montez Press Radio to release On the Ground: Broadcasts, a series of radio programs that further explore the subject through staged conversations, interviews, readings, etc. Set in their recording studio and performance space in Chinatown, these broadcasts provide another platform to disseminate our ongoing generative research. These four radio broadcasts will collage case studies, conversations, and field recordings to weave our findings together. The first one, titled Threshold, will air on Sunday, March 26.
 
On the Ground: Open Sessions
On the last Wednesday of each month Storefront will open the gallery for On the Ground: Open Sessions, inviting a different guest to curate and host the evening. These informal gatherings will open a space for collective learning where critical issues surrounding the transformation of New York’s ground floor are shared and discussed. 
 
On the Ground: Reader
A publication with excerpts from the cumulative research, new commissions, and archival materials will be published at the end of this year-long program. 

 

 

2023 – 2024 Exhibition Calendar

Canal Street Research Association                 March 1 – May 20

Francisca Benítez                                            June 10 – August 19

Ilana Harris-Babou                                           September 9 – December 16

Open Call Exhibition                                        January 20, 2024 – February 17, 2024

 

On the Ground
On the Ground is a year-long research project and exhibition series about New York City’s ground floor. Through a close look at the urban typology of the storefront, this expansive endeavor presents newly commissioned artistic explorations and dialogues about the heterogeneous threshold between public and private space throughout 2023. The project will unfold through three exhibitions, a radio show, an open call, a public program, and a thematic reader. 

 

Credits

Graphic design by Estudio Herrera 

Photography by PJ Rountree 

 

Support
Storefront’s On the Ground program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

Member’s Event: Guided Tour of Public Space in a Private Time with Justin Beal

Public Space in a Private Time: Building Storefront for Art and Architecture, 2022. 
Photo by Michael Oliver.

 

Wednesday, November 16

6:30pm 

97 Kenmare St, New York, NY

 
Join us for a guided tour with artist Justin Beal as he walks us through our 40th-anniversary exhibition Public Space in a Private Time: Building Storefront for Art and Architecture.
 
This exhibition connects our focus on the built environment with New York City’s social and political challenges at the time of its founding in 1982. Through a close reading of early shows and projects, Public Space in a Private Time showcases the leading role Storefront has played in the defense of public space through artistic practice. 
 
Justin Beal is an artist and writer based in New York. His first book, Sandfuture, was published by the MIT Press in September 2021. Beal was a co-organizer of Public Space in a Private Time and will lead a small group of Storefront members in an intimate conversation around the show.
 
If you would like to join and are not yet a Storefront member, please sign up here, or contact us at membership@storefrontnews.org.
 
Note to members: This event has limited capacity. Please RSVP by Friday November 11.
 

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Support 

Storefront’s 40th Anniversary program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

People’s Gardens: Walking Tour with the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space


Adam’s House in Paradise, 1984. Photo by Glenn Weiss. Storefront for Art and Architecture.

 

Saturday, November 12

2:30pm – 4pm

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

[RSVP]

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture, in partnership with the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space, invites you to join a walking tour of community gardens in Lower Manhattan. Led by Bill Di Paola and Marco Lanier from MoRUS, the walk will begin at Storefront’s gallery at 97 Kenmare Street and will culminate at La Plaza Cultural on East 9th Street in the East Village, meandering through six other sites along the route. Each of these gardens hold historical and political significance as places of resistance in the struggles against increasing real estate expansion and austerity. Stops include:
 
1. Elizabeth Street Garden
2. Liz Christy Garden
3. Garden of Eden Site
4. Children’s Magical Garden
5. 6B Garden
6. Carmen’s Garden
7. La Plaza Cultural
 
As a living history of urban activism, the Museum of Reclaimed Urban Space (MoRUS) chronicles the East Village community’s history of grassroots action. It celebrates the local activists who transformed abandoned spaces and vacant lots into vibrant community spaces and gardens. Many of these innovative, sustainable concepts and designs have since spread out to the rest of the city and beyond.

 

This event has a limited capacity. Please RSVP to join us for this special afternoon.

 

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Support 

Storefront’s 40th Anniversary program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

Members Event: The Architects by Amie Seigel at The Museum of Modern Art

Amie Siegel, The Architects, 2014. © 2014 Amie Siegel

 

Tuesday, October 25

4:30pm 

The Museum of Modern Art

11 W 53rd St, New York, NY

 

[RSVP]

 

Join us for a viewing of The Architects with artist Amie Siegel at The Museum of Modern Art. As a special event for our Storefront Members, Siegel will host an intimate conversation around this piece. 
 
The Architects, originally commissioned by Storefront for the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale as part of OfficeUS, is a film that cuts transversely through the city of New York, moving through ten architecture studios, unveiling the operational territories and landscapes of global architecture production. The piece was recently acquired by The Museum of Modern Art and is currently on view in the Philip Johnson Galleries. 
 
If you would like to join and are not yet a Storefront member, please sign up here, or contact us at members@storefrontnews.org.
 
Note to members: This event has limited capacity. Please RSVP by Friday, October 21st
 
Amie Siegel works variously in film, video, photography, sound, sculpture, and installation. She is known for her meticulously constructed works that trace and perform systems of value, examine relationships between objects, materials, and spaces, and expose the plasticity of the moving image through sound and performance. The artist’s current and recent exhibitions include The Silence, ArkDes, Stockholm (2022); Bloodlines, Scottish National Museum Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh (2022); 34th São Paulo Biennial, Brazil; (2021); Medium Cool, Blaffer Art Museum, Houston (2019); Winter, Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (2017); Strata, South London Gallery (2017), Double Negative, Museum Villa Stuck, Munich (2016) and Ricochet, Kunstmuseum Stuttgart (2016). Siegel has been a fellow of the DAAD Berliner-Künstlerprogramm and the Guggenheim Foundation and a 2021 Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants to Artists award recipient. She lives and works in New York City.

Artist Talk: Tehching Hsieh – One Year Performance (1981-1982)

Wednesday, October 26

6:30pm – 8pm

97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

[RSVP]

 

In the context of our 40th anniversary exhibition Public Space in a Private Time, artist Tehching Hsieh will share his experiences about One Year Performance (1981-1982). This seminal durational performance, where he spent an entire year living outdoors, concluded during Storefront’s inaugural program Performance A-Z in 1982.
 
This conversation by Hsieh, in dialogue with Storefront’s director José Esparza Chong Cuy, is an opportunity to delve deeper into the year preceding the opening of Storefront. Hsieh and his work offer a window into the politics of public space around the Lower Manhattan of that era.
 
For this particular performance, Hsieh spent a full year living outside and moving around New York while documenting his daily experience. He pledged never to enter any building or form of shelter during the entire duration of the piece. 
 
Performance A-Z was organized by Storefront’s founders, Kyong Park and R.L. Seltman, and artist Arleen Schloss, as a 26-day sequence of performances by New York-based artists — one for each letter of the alphabet. On the ninth evening, corresponding with letter I, Storefront’s community gathered outside of Hsieh’s apartment to witness the conclusion of his year-long performance piece. 
 
Please RSVP to join us for this special evening.

 

Tehching Hsieh was born in 1950 in Nan-Chou, Taiwan. Hsieh dropped out from high school in 1967 and took up painting. After finishing compulsory military service (1970-73), Hsieh had his first solo show at the gallery of the American News Bureau in Taiwan. Shortly after this solo show, Hsieh stopped painting. He made a performance action, Jump, in which he broke both of his ankles. He trained as a seaman, which he then used as a means to enter the United States. In July of 1974, Hsieh arrived at a small port near Philadelphia. He was an illegal immigrant in the States for fourteen years until granted amnesty in 1988.    

 

Starting in the late 1970s, Hsieh made five One Year Performances and a Thirteen Year Plan’, inside and outside his studio in New York City. Using long durations, making art and life simultaneous, Hsieh achieved one of the most radical approaches in contemporary art. The first four One Year Performances made Hsieh a regular name in the art scene in New York; the last two pieces, intentionally retreating from the art world, set a tone of sustained invisibility. Since the Millennium, released from the restriction of not showing his works during the thirteen-year period, Hsieh has exhibited his work in North and South America, Asia and Europe. Hsieh recent exhibitions Doing Time was presented by Taiwan Pavilion at 57th Venice Art Biennale 2017, One Year Performance 1980-981 was exhibited at Tate Modern, London, in 2017-2018, and MoMa and Guggenheim Museum, New York, in 2009.

 

Tehching Hsieh lives in Brooklyn, New York.

 

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Support 

Storefront’s 40th Anniversary program is made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

Public Space In A Private Time

Public Space In A Private Time: Building Storefront for Art and Architecture
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY

 

Exhibition Opening:
Saturday, September 17th from 4–6 pm [RSVP]

 

Gallery Hours:
Wednesdays – Saturdays, 12-6 pm
September 17th–December 10th, 2022

 

#publicspaceinaprivatetime   @storefrontnyc  

 

The establishment of certain spaces in the city as “public” is a reminder, a warning, that the rest of the city isn’t public.
— Vito Acconci, 1990

 

On the occasion of the gallery’s 40th anniversary, Public Space in a Private Time: Building Storefront for Art and Architecture connects our focus on the built environment with New York City’s social and political challenges at the time of its founding in 1982. Through a close reading of early shows and projects, the exhibition showcases the leading role Storefront has played in the defense of public space through artistic practice.

 

Using our own archive as its main resource, Public Space in a Private Time foregrounds Storefront’s early preoccupation with the dominance of private interests in the public sphere, as well as with the accelerated pace of urban development, gentrification, and displacement. All these issues were of deep concern in New York City during those years, and continue, urgently, to require attention today—both here and around the world.

 

Taking its title from an essay presented at Storefront in 1990 by artist Vito Acconci, the exhibition highlights the role this organization has long played in positioning art and architecture at the center of public life. It focuses on key exhibitions, competitions, and open calls that have been instrumental in the shaping of Storefront’s ethos, and includes a section about the making of the iconic facade by Acconci and architect Steven Holl from 1993, which continues to embody our mission as an enduring public artwork in Lower Manhattan.

 

The exhibition Public Space in a Private Time is presented as part of Storefront’s 40th anniversary and will be accompanied by a series of events that examine moments of resistance against the erasure of civic space in New York City.

 

Credits

 

Public Space in a Private Time: Building Storefront for Art and Architecture is part of an anniversary initiative that studies the organization’s early history to inform future programs. The exhibition is collectively organized by Storefront’s staff with artist and board member Justin Beal. Graphic design by Pentagram.

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture Team:

José Esparza Chong Cuy, Executive Director and Chief Curator

Jessica Kwok, Curatorial Fellow

Eduardo Meneses, Gallery and Operations Manager

Andrea Molina Cuadro, Gallery and Exhibitions Fellow

Guillermo Ruiz de Teresa, Curator of Programs and Public Affairs

 

Support

 

Storefront’s 40th Anniversary program has been made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, the Ruth Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; the Storefront Circle and Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

      

Guided Tour: The Absolute Restoration of All Things

Wednesday, May 4th, 2022
6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
97 Kenmare Street, New York, NY
 

RSVPs are kindly encouraged for this event.

 
 
 

Join us for a guided tour with artist Miguel Fernández de Castro and anthropologist Natalia Mendoza as they walk us through their exhibition The Absolute Restoration of All Things at Storefront. 

 

The exhibition unfolds from a 2014 lawsuit that shut down the operations of a gold mine in the Sonoran Desert in the northwest of Mexico. This groundbreaking case, brought to court by the “ejidatarios” (communal land holders) of the mining site claiming that their territory was illegally occupied and exploited, ruled that the mining company was “obliged to fully restore the ecosystem that prevailed in this place, with its hills, mountains, waters, air, flora, and fauna that existed before.”

 

For the event, Fernández de Castro and Mendoza will contextualize the objects on display to hone in on land rights and the limits of the legal language that is meant to protect it. Concepts like the “ejido”, and other forces unique to this territory, will be discussed. 

 

About the Exhibition

The Absolute Restoration of All Things was commissioned by Storefront for Art and Architecture and presents a new film, a sculpture, a photomural, diagrams, and objects from the mining site. Together, these works present a panoramic picture of the expansive devastation caused by the mining industry, alongside the unattainable legal verdict that aims to restore this particular part of the Sonoran Desert.
 
RSVP for the event here.
 
Read more about the exhibition here.
 
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Support
The Absolute Restoration of All Things is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts and Fundación Jumex.
 
Building Cycles has been made possible through the support of the Graham Foundation, as well as from DS+R; KPF; Steven Holl Architects; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.