Call for Ideas: Independent Projects

Friday February 3, 2017 – Monday February 20, 2017

Apply for a NYSCA Grant through Storefront
 
 
Closed Worlds, 2016. Storefront for Art and Architecture. Photo by Jake Naughton.
 
Do you have an idea for a project that promotes alternatives? This year, Storefront will sponsor twenty independent architecture and design projects through NYSCA.
 
WHAT IS THE GRANT?
The Architecture + Design Program of the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) awards project grants for individuals or teams through its Independent Projects category. These grants, of up to $10,000, are awarded to architects, landscape architects, graphic designers, fashion designers, industrial designers, and interior designers to “creatively explore or research an issue or problem in the design, planning, and/or historic preservation fields that advances the field and contributes to the public’s understanding of the built environment.”
 
NYSCA seeks projects that are innovative in nature and emphasize the artistry of design excellence. Projects may lead to the creation of design prototypes, explore new technology that impacts design, research a topic in design or architectural history, or engage in critical or theoretical analyses.
 
Storefront will sponsor up to 20 projects for 2018 calendar year. Priority will be given to applications that align with Storefront’s organizational mission to advance innovative and critical positions that go beyond disciplinary and ideological boundaries.
 
To read more information, see page 48 of NYSCA’s funding guidelines.
 
HOW DO I APPLY?
1. Complete the initial application form and send to Andrew Emmet, Development and Outreach Associate at Storefront, by emailing ae@storefrontnews.org with the subject line “NYSCA Independent Project Application Request” no later than midnight on February 20, 2017.
 
2. If you are selected as one of the 20 projects sponsored by Storefront, you will be asked to submit a full project proposal no later than midnight on March 10, 2017
 
3. Additional application materials may be required in order to complete the submission. All additional materials must be received before March 20, 2017.
 
AM I ELIGIBLE?
Grants are for individuals or groups, and applicants must be New York State residents at the time of application and while the project is being implemented. Student and faculty work that serves as part of a course curriculum is ineligible. Projects submitted by current students or faculty must demonstrate that the work was not part of a course curriculum. Note that individuals or teams may not apply for another NYSCA project with another team or with another fiscal sponsor organization. If individuals appear on more than one request, both requests will be ineligible for support. Further eligibility requirements may apply. 
 
WHAT IS THE TIMELINE?
NYSCA Independent Project Grants cannot be used to support past work or current client work. They are intended to support new ideas and explorations that further the evolution of relevant design fields. Therefore, projects must take place between January 2018 and December 2018.
 
HOW CAN I LEARN MORE?
The complete program guidelines and application instructions are available here. NYSCA also produced an Independent Projects Webinar, embedded below. For additional information, visit www.nysca.org.
 

 

Winners: Taking Buildings Down Competition

Monday March 7, 2016

Storefront for Art and Architecture is pleased to announce the results of the Taking Buildings Down Competition, juried by Jeff Byles, Keller Easterling, Pedro Gadanho, Jorge Otero-Pailos, Annabelle Selldorf, and INCA.

 

Taking Buildings Down, the winner of Storefront’s Competition of Competitions, was a call for ideas that sought proposals for the production of voids; the demolition of buildings, structures, and infrastructures; or the subtraction of objects and/or matter as a creative act.

 

The competition received over 160 qualified submissions. The members of the jury elected to give three ex aequo awards as well as five honorable mentions. Each of the three ex aequo awards will receive $1,000 and each of the five honorable mentions will receive $100.

 

 

Ex Aequo Awards:

 

Empty University

Antonas Office (Aristide Antonas, Katerina Koutsogianni, Yannikos Vassiloulis, Chara Stergiou)

 

Empty University

 

Jury Statement:

The jury values the proposal’s demand for a new spatial and educational paradigm achieved through the strategic elimination of the non-bearing walls of a building in Athens. This process of removal allows for and insinuates the emergence of new forms of collective learning. The project’s site and program within Greek contemporary politics makes this proposal of spatial and ideological erasure a very timely one, and one that makes us reflect not only about Greece, but also about the architectures that sustain and produce educational environments around the world.

 

The Life of a Building

Maciej Siuda, Rodrigo Garda Gonzalez, Madej Siuda, Rodrigo García González, Aleksandra Borçecka, Agnieszka Wach, Katarzyna Dabkowska

 

The Life of a Building

The Life of a Building

 

Jury Statement:

The jury values the specific use of erasure as a form of spatial narration, storytelling, and memory production. “The Life of a Building” presents a series of interventions before the total demolition of the building. In a highly saturated built environment, where buildings are being demolished too often just at once, the project presents a much layered understanding of the built environment and its history.

 

 

Man’s Temple and The Forgotten Canyon

Untitled Studio (William Smith, Hiroshi Kaneko)

 

Man's Temple and the Forgotten Canyon

Man’s Temple and the Forgotten Canyon

 

Jury Statement:

The jury values the strategic implications of this proposal in its local scale and global consequences. Taking as its site the Glen Canyon Dam, a global referent for land engineering, the project produces a clear and direct criticism of 20th century forms of energy production and land manipulation. The project, proposing the restoration of the site by demolition, takes into account the animal species affected and displaced throughout the history of the project. The proposal thus navigates between the material, historical, and biologic architectures of the site and the planet.

 

 

 

Honorable Mentions:

 

Demolition Bonds

wOS (A.J.P. Artemel, Swarnabh Ghosh, Lauren McQuistion, Samuel Medina)

 

Demolition Bonds

 

 

Desertion

Alex Fuller and Teddy Planitzer with Shannon Starkey

 

Desertion

 

 

Dustification

Lindsey Petersen

Dustification

 

 

 

Juan Jesus and his Sledgehammer

Scott Claassen, Gabrel Gonzales, Robert Hutchison, Cory Mattheis, Gregory Hicks

 

Juan Jesus and His Sledgehammer

 

 

 

Urban Reefs

Decentralized Design Lab (David Kennedy, Jacob Mans, Benjamin Peek)

 

Copy of 0020_Benjamin Peek_Urban Reefs_Page_03_c

Call for Ideas: Producing Alternatives

Thursday March 3, 2016 – Thursday March 24, 2016

Apply for a NYSCA Grant through Storefront 
 
PFPFPast Futures, Present Futures, 2012. Storefront for Art and Architecture. Photo by Naho Kubota.
 
Do you have an idea for a project that promotes alternative ideas in art and architecture? This year, Storefront will sponsor twenty independent architecture and design projects through NYSCA.
 
WHAT IS THE GRANT?
The Architecture + Design Program of the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) awards project grants for individuals or teams through its Independent Projects category. These grants, of up to $10,000, are awarded to architects, landscape architects, graphic designers, fashion designers, industrial designers, and interior designers to “creatively explore or research an issue or problem in the design, planning, and/or historic preservation fields that advances the field and contributes to the public’s understanding of the built environment.”
 
NYSCA is looking for projects that are innovative in nature and emphasize the artistry of design excellence. Projects may lead to the creation of design prototypes, explore new technology that impacts design, research a topic in design or architectural history, or engage in critical or theoretical analyses.
 
Storefront will sponsor up to 20 projects for this year’s NYSCA grants. Priority will be given to applications that align with Storefront’s organizational mission to advance innovative and critical positions that go beyond disciplinary and ideological boundaries.
 
To read more information, see page 48 of NYSCA’s funding guidelines.
 
PROCESS
1. Complete the initial application form and send to Alexandra Axiotis, Development and Outreach Associate at Storefront, by emailing aa@storefrontnews.org with the subject line “NYSCA Independent Project Application Request” no later than midnight on March 17, 2016
 
2. If you are selected as one of the 20 projects sponsored by Storefront, you will be asked to submit a full project proposal no later than midnight on March 24, 2016.
 
3. If you are selected, you may be asked to submit additional application information before March 30, 2016. By submitting a full application form, you agree to submit any additional application materials by Storefront by this date. 
Note that individuals or teams may not apply for another NYSCA project with another team or with another fiscal sponsor organization. If individuals appear on more than one request, both requests will be ineligible for support.
 
AM I ELIGIBLE?
Grants are for individuals or groups, and applicants must be New York State residents at the time of application and while the project is being implemented. Student and faculty work that serves as part of a course curriculum is ineligible. 
To determine further eligibility, click here and see the section entitled “Independent Projects Webinar.”
 
WHAT IS THE TIMELINE?
NYSCA Independent Project Grants cannot be used to support past work or current client work. They are intended to support new ideas and explorations that further the evolution of relevant design fields. Therefore, projects must take place between January 2017 and December 2017.
 
HOW CAN I LEARN MORE?
For additional information, visit www.arts.ny.gov.

Winners: Closed Worlds Design Competition

Tuesday February 16, 2016

 

Storefront is pleased to announce the winner and finalists of the Closed Worlds Design Competition. A jury comprised of Michelle Addington, Mitchell Joachim, Lydia Kallilpoliti, Michael Young, and Eva Franch selected the winning installation, Some World Games.

 

Some World Games is a virtual reality installation displayed at Storefront for Art and Architecture as part of Closed Worlds, an exhibition curated by Lydia Kallipoliti that presents an archive of 41 living prototypes of closed resource regeneration systems built over the last century. The archive represents an unexplored genealogy of closed systems in architectural practice. Some World Games brings a virtual reality installation to the gallery as a contemporary 42nd prototype of a closed system.

 

WINNING INSTALLATION

 

Some Worlds Games by Farzin Farzin

[Farzin Lotfi-Jam, Sharif Anous, John Arnold]

 

Some World Games is an immersive environment that urges visitors to explore and experiment with virtual prototypes generated from the archive of 41 closed systems exhibited as part of the larger Closed Worlds exhibition. Participants are guided through the installation on a looped track that channels their kinetic motion through an orbiting virtual environment.

 

Some World Games harnesses the expended energy of exhibition exploration—the acts of reading, viewing, and wandering—and puts this agency on display. Entering the installation is a decisive act in which the visitor consents to a moment of vulnerability, plugging into the universe of the archive and engaging with its content through virtual immersion in physical space.

 

FF_SomeWorldGames

Some World Games. Image by Farzin Farzin.

 

About the Installation Designer

Farzin Farzin designs spaces, software, and media. Founded and led by Farzin Lotfi-Jam since 2008, the studio operates from New York City. Farzin Lotfi-Jam (b. 1984, Tehran) is an adjunct professor at Columbia University. He holds advanced degrees from Columbia University and RMIT University in Melbourne Australia.  He is a 2015-2017 Fellow of the Akademie Schloss Solitude in Stuttgart and was a 2013-2014 Sanders Fellow at the University of Michigan. His work investigates the means by which objects, sites and systems acquire cultural value and examines the representation of value in architectural form.

 

————————————

 

FINALISTS

 

Runner-Up:

Two Naughts by Ibañez Kim

[Mariana Ibañez, Simon Kim, Mark Yim, Chris Johnson]

 

Two naughts is a prototype transitioning from a closed circle into a different lofted circle, producing a curving, vaulted surface – a strange object that rocks but doesn’t fall, created from a simple transformation of formal geometries. Inside the object, there are embedded electronics and hydronics in a feedback system of piezo-electric film, which activates radiant heating. To access the heat, visitors must physically push the object, much like a weeble-wobble.

 

 

Two Naughts. Image by Ibañez Kim.

 

 

Honorable Mention:

Safe House by APTUM

[Julie Larsen, Roger Hubeli]

 

Safe House is a global vault, a safe keep for architectural ideas as seeds for alternative worlds. Materially, the Safe house is a depository in a hermetically enclosed chamber where the exhibition is located. There is only one air-lock entry to the vault and a hidden emergency exit door.

Safe House

 

Safe House. Image by APTUM.

 

 

Honorable Mention:

Breathe Box by CASE

[Anna Dyson, Josh Draper, Nancy Diniz, Naomi Keena, Mohamed Aly, Berardo Mattalucci, Benjamin Feagin, Kenton Phillips, Mae-Ling Lokko]

 

Breathe Box is an apparatus for a series of public experiments that will test health parameters and executive function relative to IAQ (Internal Air Quality). Participants will sign releases, fill out medical questionnaires and don wearable biometric devices. With AMPS switched off, up to four people at a time will sit in the Breathe Box for up to several hours. As CO2 levels reach a critical point, artificial lighting will activate and a series of fans will draw the air in the Breathe Box through the roots of each AMPS module. Healthier, more breathable air will be returned to the Breathe Box.

 

Breathe Box

 

Breathe Box. Image by CASE.

Call for Ideas: Taking Buildings Down

Tuesday January 12, 2016 – Wednesday January 20, 2016

(The Competition of the Competition of Competitions)

NOTE: The registration deadline for Taking Buildings Down has been extended until Wednesday, January 20th.

 

TBD_Intro

 

What does it mean to build? Traditionally, building has been defined as the assembly of parts or materials toward the creation of a whole. While to build is often perceived as an Apollonian pursuit, to destroy appears to be its Dionysian counterpart. Understanding that our built environment is the product of many forces, it can dialectically be reduced to the tensions between creation and destruction, addition and subtraction, and erection and demolition.
 
In a design culture focused on the superlative (the tallest, the newest, the priciest), in which destruction is often perceived of or produced by an act of violence, the processes of removal appear as secondary concerns or collateral damage. However, if we are to better understand the life cycles of our built environment, we must explore the possibilities and implications of Taking Buildings Down.
 
This competition of ideas is simultaneously a political act, a means of criticism, and a method of speculation.
 
Taking Buildings Down asks proposals for the production of voids; the demolition of buildings, structures, and infrastructures; or the subtraction of objects and/or matter as a creative act. Removal is all that is allowed.

 

ELIGIBILITY

This call is open to anyone interested in articulating visions for the future of our built environment.

 

CONTENT AND CRITERIA

Each proposal should consider and present three items:

 

1)  A pre-existing current condition

2)  A process of removal

3)  A resultant condition of removal

 

Proposals should consider contemporary contexts. There are no limitations in scale or scope. The focus of the proposal may be on the process of removal, the resultant condition, or both.

 

Projects will be judged on their ambition, vision, methodology, and clarity.

 

AWARDS

Three monetary prizes will be awarded to the winners of Taking Buildings Down. These include:

 

1st Prize: $2000

2nd Prize: $1000

3rd Prize:  $500

 

PUBLICATION

Winning entries and any additional entries deemed to be worthy of publication will be included in a printed competition compendium released by Storefront for Art and Architecture.

 

QUESTIONS

Below are answers to questions we have received:

Q: Does the submission require both physical and digital copies be submitted?

A: Yes.

Q: Can the format of the submission be Landscape orientation?

A: Yes, as long as the size is 8.5″ x 11″.

Q: I want to submit a video, but file upload limit is 15MB, how do I do this?

A: Please submit a PDF with a still frame image and a link to download the video through Vimeo, YouTube, or your preferred web service.

 

JURY

Jeff Byles

Jeff Byles is the author of Rubble: Unearthing the History of Demolition, a wide-ranging investigation of “unbuilding” as a culture-shaping force. Deeply engaged in public design and its role as a catalyst for cultural innovation, Jeff has explored the built environment in his nearly 20 years as a writer, journalist, editor, and urban thinker. Jeff’s expertise in public design includes leadership roles at Van Alen Institute, where he oversaw research initiatives focused on urban form and well-being and helped lead design competitions and public programs devoted to transforming cities and public spaces. 

 

Through his role in the design and consulting practice Being Here, Jeff works at the intersection of site and society to inspire ecological, social, and economic vitality in communities through creative collaboration. Jeff is the co-author of A History of Design from the Victorian Era to the Present, and he has lectured internationally on architecture, landscape, and the future of the city. Since 2014, Jeff has served as President of The Fine Arts Federation of New York, an advocate for design excellence in New York City and beyond.
 

Keller Easterling

Keller Easterling is an architect, writer and professor at Yale University. Her most recent book, Extrastatecraft: The Power of Infrastructure Space, examines global infrastructure networks as a medium of polity. Another recent book, Subtraction, considers building removal or how to put the development machine into reverse. An ebook essay, The Action is the Form: Victor Hugo’s TED Talk previews some of the arguments in Extrastatecraft.

 

Other books include: Enduring Innocence: Global Architecture and its Political Masquerades, which researched familiar spatial products in difficult or hyperbolic political situations around the world, and Organization Space: Landscapes, Highways and Houses in America, which applied network theory to a discussion of American infrastructure.

 

Easterling is also the co-author (with Richard Prelinger) of Call it Home: The House that Private Enterprise Built, a laserdisc/DVD history of US suburbia from 1934–1960. She has published web installations including: Extrastatecraft, Wildcards: a Game of Orgman and Highline: Plotting NYC. Easterling’s research and writing was included in the 2014 Venice Biennale, and she has been exhibited at the Rotterdam Biennale and the Architectural League in New York, among other venues. Easterling has lectured and published widely in the United States and abroad. The journals to which she has contributed include Domus, Artforum, Grey Room, Cabinet, Volume, Assemblage, e-flux, Log, Praxis, Harvard Design Magazine, Perspecta, and ANY.

 

Pedro Gadanho

Pedro Gadanho is the Artistic Director of the forthcoming Museum of Art, Architecture and Technology (MAAT) in Lisbon, Portugal. Previously, he served as Curator of Contemporary Art and Architecture at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York.During his time with MoMA, Gadanho was involved in the Young Architects Program (YAP), whim aims to foster new ideas in young architects through installations at MoMA PS1, the MAXXXI Museum, the Istanbul Modern Museum, and CONSTRUCTO

.



From 2000 to 2011, Gadanho was a professor and architecture faculty member at the University of Porto in Porto, Portugal. He also previously served as director and curator for ExperiementaDesign for three years.



 

Gadanho attended Politecnico di Milano before earning his master’s degree at the University of Kent and his Ph.D in architecture and mass media from the University of Porto.

 

Jorge Otero-Pailos

Jorge Otero-Pailos (b. 1971) works at the intersection of art, architecture and preservation. He has been exhibited at major museums, festivals, galleries, and foundations; notably, Manifesta7 and the 53rd Venice Art Biennial. In 2009, he was listed as one of ten young Spanish artists to watch in Architectural Digest and was featured that same year in the BBC TV’s documentary Ugly Beauty alongside Damien Hirst, Anish Kapoor, Carl Andre, and Yoko Ono. He has received awards from major art, architecture, and preservation organizations, including the Kress Foundation, the Graham Foundation, the Fitch Foundation, and the Canadian Center for Architecture. In 2012, he received the UNESCO Eminent Professional Award. He is a member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences of Puerto Rico.

 

Otero-Pailos studied architecture at Cornell University and holds a PhD from MIT.  He is Associate Professor of Historic Preservation at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture in New York. He is the founder and editor of the journal Future Anterior

 

 

Annabelle Selldorf

Annabelle Selldorf is the Principal of Selldorf Architects, a 65-person architectural practice that she founded in New York City in 1988. The firm has worked on public and private projects that range from museums and libraries to exhibition design and a recycling facility. 

 
Selldorf Architects recently completed the Sunset Park Material Recovery Facility, a new recycling facility and education center on the Brooklyn waterfront. The firm’s renovation of The Clark’s Museum Building in Williamstown, Massachusetts opened to critical acclaim in 2014. Selldorf has designed numerous galleries including the ground-up 30,000 SF LEED Gold building for David Zwirner on West 20th Street, as well as projects for Hauser & Wirth, Barbara Gladstone, and Gagosian among others. 
 
Ms. Selldorf designed the installation of the 2013 Venice Biennale at the Arsenale in collaboration with curator Massimiliano Gioni. Selldorf Architects is currently designing an expansion for the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and Luma Arles, a new center for contemporary art in France. Born and raised in Germany, Ms. Selldorf came to the United States to study architecture and received degrees from Pratt Institute and Syracuse University. Ms. Selldorf is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects and serves on the Board of the Architectural League of New York and the Chinati Foundation.
 

INCA

David Bench (INCA) is a registered architect in New York. He works for Selldorf Architects, where he is project architect for the Luma Foundation in Arles, France, the Mwabwindo School in Zambia for the 14+ Foundation, and a private residence.  He is interested in the intersection of architecture and politics, and has explored these themes in writings for Uncube and Clog and in seminars at Abrons Art Center. He is a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin and Yale University.

 

Jonathan Chesley (INCA) works as a designer at Selldorf Architects in New York City. He first became interested in demolition while completing his MArch at the University Oregon. He assisted his Professor Erin Moore in researching notable architectural projects designed to consider the full lifecycle of buildings. These concepts informed his design work focused around the role of temporary and mobile architectures on the evolution of urban form. After graduation, he collaborated on a design/build project on the St. Lawrence River in which a boat house was renovated into a guest house. This served as the first practical application of ideas surrounding deconstruction. Other structures on the property were harvested for building materials. This slow removal was in the interest of the site’s landscape ecology. Along with working at Selldorf, Jonathan is an active volunteer of the Gowanus Canal Conservancy and Arts East New York, organizations that promote the social, cultural, and natural ecology of the city. Through these experiences, he continues to explore the pragmatic and conceptual effects of creation and destruction on urban morphology.
 

NOTIFICATION

Winning entries will be announced in February 2016.

 

REGISTRATION

Registration is now closed. For questions please contact takingbuildingsdown@storefrontnews.org

 

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Applicants will submit an application package. The package should be in 8 1/2″ x 11″ page portrait layout, with no more than 20 single-sided pages. It should be delivered in the following formats:

 

– A digital PDF (15 MB or less), uploaded to the competition platform no later than 11:59 p.m. on January 20th, 2016.

 

– A bound proposal documentation book, delivered no later than January 21st, 2016 at 6 pm to Storefront’s office at 611 Broadway, Suite 634, New York, NY 10012. Proposals received after this date and time will not be accepted. (Note that Storefront’s office is located at a different address from its gallery space).

 

 

APPLICATION PACKAGE CONTENTS

Physical applications must be packaged in a sealed envelope with registration number written clearly and legibly on the outside. The package should contain the following contents:

 

A: COVER SHEET

Please fill out and include the cover sheet as the first page of your submission. Access the Cover Sheet.

 

B: PACKAGE

Please include the following materials in a bound letter-size booklet (maximum 20 pages, including supplemental material):

 

  1. Application Cover (with proposal title and registration number)
  2. Location/Context
  3. Mission Statement (500 words or less)
  4. Three images/plans/diagrams depicting:
  1. The current condition
  2. The process and methodology of removal
  3. The resultant condition

 

FORMAT:

Participants can submit support material in the following formats:

 

  • Videos (maximum 3 minutes in length)
  • Models (maximum size 10”x10”x10”)
  • Additional documentation material as considered essential by the applicants (maximum 10 pages)

 

SCHEDULE

Thursday, November 5————————Competition Launch

Tuesday, December 1————————-Deadline for Submission of Questions

Tuesday, December 22———————–Publication of Questions and Answers

Tuesday, January 12————————–Registration Deadline

Wednesday, January 20———————-Digital Submission Deadline

Thursday, January 21————————-Physical Submission Deadline

Late February / Early March—————–Results Announced

 

ANONYMITY

Entrants may not communicate with members of the Jury about the competition in any way or form until there is a public announcement of the winner.

 

No partner, associate, or employee of any Jury member may participate in the competition.

 

Any entrant who violates these rules will be disqualified.

 

DEADLINE

Digital submissions must be entered through the competition platform by January 20th, 2016 at 11:59 pm.

 

Physical submissions must be delivered to the Storefront for Art and Architecture office on or before January 21st, 2016 between 11 am and 6 pm EST.

 

Please note the office address below:

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture

611 Broadway, Suite 634

New York, NY 10012

 

Mailed submissions must arrive at the office by the submission deadline (note that the deadline is the date of receipt, not a postmark date).

 

NOTIFICATION

Winning entries will be announced in February 2016.

 

SUGGESTED READINGS

Participants interested in additional academic, cultural, and philosophical references can consult the Taking Buildings Down bibliography (created by INCA):

http://storefrontnews.org/programming/party-bibliography-on-demo/

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Copyrights for project submissions shall remain the property of the author.

 

Submitted materials shall not be released nor exposed to the public, press, or other media before the announcement of a winning entry or the cancellation of the Competition. Applicants who violate this will be disqualified.

 

Participants agree to permit Storefront to use the submitted materials in public posts, publications, or exhibitions, or for archival, promotional, educational, and other purposes at its discretion. The Jury and/or Storefront for Art and Architecture reserve the right to cancel or suspend the Competition for any reason, including those causes beyond the organizer’s control that could corrupt the administration, security, or proper participation in the Competition.

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture assumes no responsibility for postal, email, electronic, technical, or natural conditions that prevent the receipt or judging of a Competition submission or any part thereof.

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture reserves the right to amend these Guidelines at any time without notice.

 

No information contained in submissions shall be deemed confidential and such information may be shared with other governmental entities. Therefore, please do not submit any information that may be deemed proprietary in nature. Competition sponsors shall not be liable for any costs incurred by any respondent in the preparation, submittal, presentation, or revision of its submission. Competition sponsors shall not be obligated to pay and shall not pay any costs in connection with the preparation of such submissions.

 

CREDITS

This competition is curated by INCA, the winners of the Special Prize for Storefront’s Competition of Competitions. INCA is a collaboration between David Bench and Jonathan Chesley, architects at Selldorf Architects in New York who have an interest in conceptual work as a complement to practice.

 

You can read more about the competition and the winners here: http://storefrontnews.org/archive/winners-competition-of-competitions/

 

ABOUT THE COMPETITION OF COMPETITIONS

Launched in 2013, Storefront for Art and Architecture’s “Competition of Competitions” asks participants to create a brief that formulates the questions of our time and defines the agents that should pursue the task of commissioning visions for the future.

 

The competition provides a space for critical thought about the way competitions and commissions are organized, and allows participants to rethink the structure, content, and stakeholders of competition briefs. In doing so, participants deliver new and provocative forms of engagement with the economic, political, and social context surrounding the development of our cities.

 

For more information, please see: http://storefrontnews.org/programming/competition-of-competitions/

Call for Ideas: Closed Worlds Design Competition

Saturday October 17, 2015 – Tuesday November 17, 2015

Call for Ideas: Design Competition for CLOSED WORLDS

Submission Deadline: Monday, November 16, 2015 11:59 ppm

 

Earth as seen on July 6, from a distance of almost one million miles by a NASA scientific camera on board the Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft. CreditNASA

Earth as seen on July 6, from a distance of almost one million miles by a NASA scientific camera on board the Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft. Credit: NASA.


What do outer space capsules, submarines, and office buildings have in common? Each was conceived as a closed system: a self-sustaining physical environment demarcated from its surroundings by a boundary that does not allow for the transfer of matter or energy.

 

The history of twentieth century architecture, design, and engineering has been strongly linked to the conceptualization and production of closed systems. As partial interpretations of the world in time and in space, closed systems identify and secure materials necessary for life. Contemporary discussions about global warming, recycling, and sustainability have emerged as direct conceptual constructs related to the study and analysis of closed systems.

 

In February 2016, Storefront for Art and Architecture will open Closed Worlds, an exhibition of 41 living prototypes built over the last century that present an unexplored genealogy of closed resource regeneration systems. From the space program to countercultural architectural groups experimenting with autonomous living, the exhibition documents a larger disciplinary transformation in the postwar period and the rise of a new environmental consensus in the form of a synthetic naturalism, where the laws of nature and metabolism are displaced from the domain of wilderness to the domain of cities and buildings.

 

For this exhibition, Storefront for Art and Architecture is looking for a designer to produce the 42nd piece of the chronology of experiments. The selected designer(s) will have the opportunity to use the installation as a testing ground for a new closed system. The designer will work closely with the Closed Worlds curatorial team. Once the proposal of a Closed System is selected, the designer will be responsible for the development of the installation and for the display of related exhibition materials into the space of the gallery, leading the overall exhibition design. You can find exhibition research information and documentation samples in the right column, in “Documents”.
 

ELIGIBILITY

 

This call is open to anyone with demonstrated experience in the conceptualization, design, and production of spatial prototypes, including architects, artists, designers, engineers, and environmental scientists, among others.

 

The winning team will be based in New York or be able to easily produce and manage the final design and construction of the installation and hold regular meetings with the Closed Worlds curatorial team. The winning team will be able to work intensely within a given time frame for the preparation and installation of the exhibition between November 2015 and February 2016.

 

Applications will be accepted from individuals and firms, and architects need not be licensed. Interdisciplinary collaborations are strongly encouraged. Applicants outside of New York City are eligible to apply, but housing and transportation will not be provided.

 

CRITERIA

 

Conceptual Framework

The jury will value the originality and poignancy of the elements to be considered essential in the definition of a closed system. From human waste (excrement, sweat, skin particles) to digital/electronic waste (data, hardware) to forms of capital (energy generation, organic remediation, light), the proposal should clearly identify the essential sources that drive the closed system. Although the closed system (digestive machine) should perform certain conversions, feedback efficiency will not be the primary criteria of the jury, as disobedient machines – critical devices – will also be valued.

 

Site Specificity

Proposals should take in consideration the specific location and space of Storefront’s gallery in New York, and should demonstrate an understanding of the various forces and constituencies at play on the specific site (including, but not limited to: temperature, sound, pollution, noise, etc.)

 

Design Flexibility

The content of the Closed Worlds exhibition is extensive and includes an archive of 41 projects (including images, texts, logos, drawings, bibliography, and other data for each project), 41 respective speculative feedback drawings, a large-scale graphic timeline, and an extensive lexicon of keywords in environmental history. Applicants are encouraged to experiment with and suggest different formats of display, but final layout will be determined in collaboration with the exhibition’s curatorial team.

 

BUDGET/PRIZE

 

The winning designer(s) will be awarded a production budget of $12,000 for construction, assembly, and disassembly of the closed system. Additionally, the selected team will be awarded a design/managing fee in the amount of $1,500. All other production and fabrication expenses related to the closed system exceeding $12,000 shall be assumed by the winner. An independent budget will be allocated for the printing of the archival materials and exhibition signage.

 

The winner will work with the Storefront for Art and Architecture production team to realize the design, and will work with the Closed Worlds curatorial team to fulfill all exhibition requirements. The winning team will be responsible for project management of any manufacturers/vendors involved in production. The completed project is scheduled to open to the public in February 2016. The project will be widely publicized through Storefront’s media channels and social networks.

 

SUBMISSION PROCESS

 

Background Materials and Questions

All questions should be emailed to closedworlds@storefrontnews.org by November 3rd, 2015. Relevant questions and answers will be posted on Storefront’s website (www.storefrontnews.org) on the Closed Worlds exhibition page before or on November 6th, 2015.

 

Storefront’s gallery is open to the public from Tuesday through Saturday, 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

 

On October 29th from 5 to 6 pm, Max Lauter, Storefront’s Gallery Manager and Project Coordinator, will conduct a walk-through of the gallery space for interested applicants and will answer any questions in person.

 

To download Storefront for Art and Architecture’s gallery plan, click here.

 

To see photos of past installations at Storefront for Art and Architecture, see our online archive or photo gallery.

 

Registration 

Competitors are required to register for the competition in advance of the submission date. Registrations must be received by November 10th, 2015 before midnight.

 

Applicants can register online at https://storefront.submittable.com/submit

 

There is a $50 registration fee ($25 for members of Storefront). Projects that have not registered by the November 10th deadline will not be reviewed. After registration, each applicant will receive an email with registration confirmation.

 

Submission
Applicants will submit an application package. The package should be in 8 1/2″ x 11″ page portrait layout, with no more than 23 single-sided pages. It should be delivered in the following formats:

 

  • A digital PDF (15 MB or less), uploaded to the competition platform no later than 11:59 p.m. on November 16, 2015.

 

  • A bound proposal documentation book, delivered no later than November 17 at 6 pm to Storefront’s office at 611 Broadway, Suite 634, New York, NY 10012. Proposals received after this date and time will not be accepted. (Note that Storefront’s office is located at a different address from its gallery space).

 

 

APPLICATION CONTENT

 

COVER SHEET / Page 1

 

Page 1: Contact Information. Please fill out and include the competition cover sheet as the first page of your submission.

 

APPLICATION / Pages 2-12

 

Page 2: Project title and mission statement of no more than 300 words, summarizing the proposal (1 page).

 

Page 3: Feedback drawing or diagram that represents the proposed closed system. Representationally, the identification of closed systems is linked to arrows and movement, with clear understandings of their context in both spatial and temporal frameworks (1 page).

 

Page 4-9: A series of images (up to six) including a plan, elevation, and section that collectively provide an understanding of the material, spatial, and programmatic qualities of the proposal (6 pages).

 

Page 10: Material specifications, production processes, and production times for the materialization of the project (1 page).

 

Page 11: Preliminary budget (1 page).

 

Page 12: Dispersal material plan or afterlife plan (1 page).

 

PORTFOLIO / Pages 13-22

 

Up to ten (10) digital images of recent work. (These images are in addition to images submitted as part of the project proposal). For each image, include the title, date and a brief description of the work.

 

RESUME / Page 23

 

Individual or team resume (1 page)

 

 

SCHEDULE:

 

Registration Deadline————————————————November 10, 2015

Deadline to Submit Questions————————————-November 3, 2015

Answers to Submitted Questions Posted Online————-November 6, 2015

Digital Submission Deadline—————————————November 16, 2015

Physical Submission Deadline————————————November 17, 2015

Design/Management/Construction Period———————-Dec 2015 – Jan/Feb 2016

Exhibition Opening—————————————————–February 2016

 

JURY

 

  • Michelle Addington, Hines Professor of Sustainable Architectural Design at Yale University
  • Eva Franch, Director of Storefront for Art and Architecture
  • Mitchell Joachim, Associate Professor of Practice at New York University and Principal of Terreform One
  • Lydia Kallipoliti, Assistant Professor of Architecture at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Curator of Closed Worlds exhibition
  • Michael Young, Assistant Professor of Architecture at the Cooper Union and Principal of Young/Ayata Architects

 

The Jury reserves the right to cancel the competition and/or reject any and all proposals received in response to the call for ideas.

 

Closed Worlds is curated by Lydia Kallipoliti and is supported by the Graham Foundation and the New York State Council for the Arts.

 

DEADLINE

 

Digital submissions must be entered through the submission website by November 16, 2015 at midnight.

 

Physical submissions must be delivered to the Storefront for Art and Architecture office on or before November 17, 2015 between 11 am and 6 pm EST. Mailed submissions must arrive at the office by the submission deadline (note that the deadline is the date of receipt, not a postmark date).

 

Please note the office address below (and note that this is a different address from Storefront’s gallery space).

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture

611 Broadway, Suite 634

New York, NY 10012

 

NOTIFICATION

 

The winning entry will be notified in late November 2015.

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

 

Copyrights for project submissions shall remain the property of the author.

 

The structure created for the Closed Worlds exhibition will become the property of Storefront for Art and Architecture and the Closed Worlds curatorial team.

 

Submitted materials shall not be released nor exposed to the public, press, or other media before the announcement of a winning entry or the cancellation of the Competition. Applicants who violate this will be disqualified.

 

Participants agree to permit Storefront to use the submitted materials in public posts, publications, or exhibitions, or for archival, promotional, educational, and other purposes at its discretion. The Jury and/or Storefront for Art and Architecture reserve the right to cancel or suspend the Competition for any reason, including those causes beyond the organizer’s control that could corrupt the administration, security, or proper participation in the Competition.

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture assumes no responsibility for postal, email, electronic, technical, or natural conditions that prevent the receipt or judging of a Competition submission or any part thereof.

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture reserves the right to amend these Guidelines at any time without notice.

 

No information contained in submissions shall be deemed confidential and such information may be shared with other governmental entities. Therefore, please do not submit any information that may be deemed proprietary in nature. Competition sponsors shall not be liable for any costs incurred by any respondent in the preparation, submittal, presentation, or revision of its submission. Competition sponsors shall not be obligated to pay and shall not pay any costs in connection with the preparation of such submissions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winners: WorldWide Storefront

Friday May 16, 2014 – Sunday November 23, 2014

Storefront for Art and Architecture announces the 10 selected projects that will be part of WorldWide Storefront (WWSf), a new initiative to provide a simultaneous, multi-locus of alternative spaces around the globe and a digital platform for the expression and exchange of latent desires within contemporary art and architecture practices.

 

A jury composed of Beatrice Galilee, Joseph Grima, Jimenez Lai and Marina Otero has selected a group of ten proposals from around the globe. From the study of different states of abandonment in Athens to the discussion of around urban growth in Santo Domingo, from the occupation of a public residual space in the city of Los Angeles to a traveling production space aboard a commercial container carrier, from individuals to collectives across the globe, these ten projects constitute a group of curatorial visions that articulate alternative positions within their particular context. 

 

From September 19 to November 21, 2014, all selected entries throughout the world will simultaneously open and have a two-month program of exhibitions and events. All events will be recorded and broadcast through the WorldWide Storefront online platform and presented at the Storefront for Art and Architecture Gallery embedded in the installation WWSf Portal, a collaborative design by Marc Fornes and Jana Winderen.

 

 

WORLD WIDE STOREFRONT SELECTED ENTRIES

 

Container Art Residency / Itinerant

Maayan Strauss

An artist residency that will invite artists to travel on board commercial freight ships to worldwide destinations along various shipping routes, addressing questions of isolation and transportation as a way of redefining the contemporary artist studio. 

 

Gallery Attachment / Los Angeles, USA

Andrew Kovacs, Laurel Consuelo Broughton

A space designed and constructed by the authors under a bridge in Los Angeles will serve simultaneously as an architectural object and as a container for a series of events, exhibitions and performances.

 

Host: Natural Histories / Los Angeles, USA

Mimi Zeiger ( Los Angeles Forum for Architecture and Urban Design),  Leonardo Bravo and River Jukes-Hudson (Big City Forum), Sarah Lorenzen (VDL Research House)

Located at The Neutra VDL Research Site in the Silverlake district of Los Angeles, the project explores the multivalent meaning of the word “host”: a talk-show host, a parasitic host body, and host house or city, via an exhibition and series of events.

 

Microgeographies / Athens, Greece

Hariklia Hari 

Reacting to the states of abandonment of cities in Greece as a result of personal and social crisis, and reflecting on the gradual reconstruction processes occurring in southern Europe, Microgeographies will present a series micro-exhibitions, actions, installations and performances in public and domestic spaces.

 

Next Station / Tel Aviv, Israel

Onya Collective [Avigail Roubini, Gil Cohen, Robert Ungar, Neta Steingart, Adam Kalderon]

A series of small interventions in and around the Tel-Aviv Central Bus Station in Neve Shaanan exploring different ways of embedding agriculture and natural ecologies in urban environments.

 

The Portal / Toronto, Canada

Megan Torza

The Portal  will  activate Toronto’s under recognized ravine landscape through a series of interventions and discussions occupying the entrance of an architecture studio.

 

Storefront Marketplace / St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, Thessaloniki, Greece and Berlin, Germany

Sandra Teitge 

Storefront Marketplace implements itself into three different market environments in the US and Europe. Starting at a Hmong market in St. Paul, Minnesota, it travels to Thessaloniki, Greece and integrates itself into the city’s urban fabric and multi-layered, multi-cultural history. It resumes in Berlin, Germany, in an old restored indoor market. Its interest lies in investigating and experimenting with the marketplace as a space for exchange through performances, food, sound, and objects. An artist run program of films, lectures, performative interventions, radio programs, and culinary events engages and addresses large, central civic constituencies. 

 

Circus for Construction / Itinerant

Circus for Construction [Ann Lui, Ashley Mendelsohn, Larisa Ovalles, Craig Reschke, Benjamin Widger]

Located on the back of a custom-built truck trailer, the Spectacle Syndicate will stop in five cities over the course of two months (Ithaca, Providence, Provincetown, Portland, Buffalo, and Boston) hosting forums, exhibitions and workshops coordinated with local experts.


A to B – Crossing the railway  / Montreal, Canada

Vincent Lalonde-Dupuy, Pierre Horo-Lin, Xavier Coulombe-Hurray, Camille Angibaud

 

This is a cartographic urban project along the Canadian Pacific’s Railway, made by citizens and users crossing the railway both legally and illegally. The project will map and discuss the urban landscape and biodiversity of the site.

 

Tropical Ghosts / Santo Domingo, Santo Domingo

Laura Castro, Monica de Moya, Engel Leonardo, and  Maurice Sánchez

A series of site-specific urban interventions and meetings in Polígono Central, Santo Domingo will explore issues of growth, identity and systems of sharing in the tropical communities. 



ABOUT THE JURY


Beatrice Galilee

Beatrice Galilee (*1982, London) is a London-based curator, writer, critic, consultant and lecturer of contemporary architecture and design. Trained in Architecture at Bath University, and in History of Architecture MSc at the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, Beatrice specialises in the dissemination of architecture and design through city-wide projects, media, curatorial practice, research, editing and teaching.

 

Beatrice is the Chief Curator of the 2013 Lisbon Architecture Triennale, Close, Closer. She was co-curator at 2011 Gwangju Design Biennale, 2009 Shenzhen Hong Kong Bi-City Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism, and curator of the experimental performance design projects Hacked and Afrofuture at Milan Design Week. She is the co-founder and director of The Gopher Hole, an exhibition and project space in London, and is associate lecturer at Central Saint Martins.

 

From 2006-2009 Beatrice was Architecture Editor for Icon Magazine, one of Europe’s leading publications in architecture and design. In 2008 she won the IBP Architectural Journalist of the Year Award.


Joseph Grima

Since studying architecture at the Architectural Association in London, Joseph Grima has pursued an international career as a curator, essayist, critic and researcher in the fields of architecture, art and design.


Between 2007 and 2010, he directed Storefront for Art and Architecture, the New York gallery which is globally renowned for its role in supporting experimental practices in architecture and contemporary art. Since April 2011, he has been the editor of Domus. He is also co-curator of the first edition of the Istanbul Design Biennial.


As a curator and independent researcher, Grima has designed and planned installations for events and institutions of international significance, including the Venice Architecture Biennial, the Shenzhen/Hong Kong Biennial of Urbanism and Architecture, and the Beijing Museum of Urban Planning. He is the author of several books, including Instant Asia (Skira, Milan, 2007), a critical overview of work by young and emerging architecture students in Asia, and Shift: SANAA and the New Museum (Lars Müller, Zurich, 2008); he has also contributed to a range of other books and publications.


Jimenez Lai

Jimenez Lai (Leader) is an Assistant Professor at University of Illinois at Chicago and Leader of Bureau Spectacular. He graduated with a Master of Architecture from University of Toronto. Previously, Jimenez Lai has lived and worked in a desert shelter at Taliesin and resided in a shipping container at Atelier Van Lieshout on the piers of Rotterdam. Before founding Bureau Spectacular, Lai worked for various international offices, including OMA. In the past years, Lai has built numerous installations as well as being widely exhibited and published around the world, including the MoMA-collected White Elephant. His first manifesto, Citizens of No Place, was published by Princeton Architectural Press with a grant from the Graham Foundation. Draft II of this book has been archived at the New Museum as a part of the show Younger Than Jesus. In 2012, Jimenez Lai has been named a winner to the Architectural League Prize for Young Architects. Lai won the Debut Award at the Lisbon Triennale in 2013. Lai was the curator and designer for the 2014 Taiwan Pavilion at the 14th Venice Architectural Biennale.


Marina Otero

Marina Otero is an architect trained in New York (Columbia University), Delft (TU) and Madrid (ESTAM), where she is completing her doctorate in architecture with a focus on contemporary cultures of circulation. In 2013, and as a Fulbright grantee, she graduated from Masters of Science in Critical, Curatorial and Conceptual Practices in Architecture at GSAPP, receiving the Program Award. Her professional and academic work has been published by Domus, Quaderns, Circo, Arquitectura Viva and El País, includes collaborations with the New Museum, The Glass House, the Istanbul Design Biennial, and has been awarded in different competitions including Europan. Marina became the director of the Global Network Programming in September 2013.

Winners: Competition of Competitions

Tuesday April 29, 2014

With more than 100 entries and 18 finalists, Storefront is pleased to announce the winners of the Competition of Competitions.

 

STOREFRONT SPECIAL PRIZE

Taking Buildings Down – INCA [David Bench, Jonathan Chesley]

 

1st PRIZE 

Deploy Yourself, Not Your Designs – The Coalition for the Improvement of Refugee Camps [Marcy Monroe, Lee Dykxhoorn]


2nd PRIZE

Labyrinth – grey_matter(s) [Annie Charleston, William McCommon, Megan McDonough, Shota Vashakmadze]

 

3rd PRIZE

Amazonia 2020 – Civic Projects [Kati Rubinyi, Deborah Richmond , Michael Powell, Ewan E. Branda]

 and

Open Source Open Space: Hacking the Built Environment – Boot/Trunk [Nicole Lindahl, Louise Mackie and Samantha Senn]

 

HONORABLE MENTIONS

The City is The Room. The Room is The City  – FormFictionFormat [Elena Palacios Carral, Manijeh Verghese]

dePOLITIsign: An open call for the redesign of a USCIS office  – Min Chen & Kristin Enright

Off-the-Radar: The Architecture of Non-Existing Space  – Mitnick-Roddier [Mireille Roddier, Keith Mitnick]

Future Factory  – Gretchen Wilkins [with Ian Nazareth and students Matthew Ellis, Ken Yip Lai, Sarah Moussa, Francisca Rodriguez, Nicholas Stathopoulos]

Rezoning the 5th Facade: Redefining New York’s City Roof Scape  – normaldesign [Matthias Neumann in collaboration with Shane T. Umman]

Second Nature – El Corbusier

Into the Void: An Architectural Competition on Emptiness  – Zooburbia [Felipe Orensanz, Rodrigo Duran] 

 

Competition of Competitions: Finalists

Friday January 31, 2014

With more than 100 entries and a long process of selection, Storefront presents the 18 finalists of the Competition of Competitions.

 

The finalists’ submissions were exhibited as part of Letters to the Mayor, an exhibition focusing on the relationship between architecture and politics.

 

Learn more about the competition here.

 

THE WINNERS OF THE COMPETITION OF COMPETITIONS CAN BE VIEWED HERE.

 

The 18 Finalists of the Competition of Competitions are:

 

ReDesign the Discipline of Architecture 

The Architecture Lobby

 

Open Source Open Space: Hacking the Built Environment 

Boot/Trunk [Nicole Lindahl, Louise Mackie and Samantha Senn]


dePOLITIsign: An open call for the redesign of a USCIS office 

Min Chen & Kristin Enright


Amazonia 2020 

Civic Projects [Kati Rubinyi, Deborah Richmond , Michael Powell, Ewan E. Branda]


Deploy Yourself, Not Your Designs 

The Coalition for the Improvement of Refugee Camps [Marcy Monroe, Lee Dykxhoorn]


Second Nature 

El Corbusier

 

The City is The Room. The Room is The City. 

FormFictionFormat [Elena Palacios Carral, Manijeh Verghese]


Labyrinth

grey_matter(s) [Annie Charleston, William McCommon, Megan McDonough, Shota Vashakmadze]


NO TITLES, A Campaign for Illegal Architecture 

GroundLAB [Sean Billy Kizy, Sara Lum, Rakia Seaborn, Nicholas Sharma]


Taking Buildings Down

INC_A

 

The Discreet Architect

Local Provision Studio [Valeria Federighi, Janet Yoon]

 

Nature, Error, Babies 

Metonymy’s Architecture [Tom Nurmi, Jeffrey Dunn, Meagan Lehr, Erika Wilder]


Off-the-Radar: The Architecture of Non-Existing Space 

Mitnick-Roddier [Mireille Roddier, Keith Mitnick]

 

Rezoning the 5th Façade: Redefining New York’s City Roof Scape 

normaldesign [Matthias Neumann in collaboration with Shane T. Umman]

 

The Next Suburb

The Thirteenth Hour


Future Factory

Gretchen Wilkins [with Ian Nazareth and students Matthew Ellis, Ken Yip Lai, Sarah Moussa, Francisca Rodriguez, Nicholas Stathopoulos]

 

BLISS: Better Living through Intuitive Soft Surveillance 

Yeadon Space Agency

 

Into the Void: An Architectural Competition on Emptiness

Zooburbia [Felipe Orensanz, Rodrigo Duran]

WorldWide Storefront – Call for Proposals

Tuesday October 8, 2013 – Friday January 31, 2014



WorldWide Storefront

September 19 – November 21, 2014

Deadline for Proposals: January 31, 2014

$1,000 in Seed Funding Available


SELECTED PROJECTS HERE

 

Storefront for Art and Architecture announces a call for proposals for WorldWide Storefront (“WWSF”), a new initiative to provide a simultaneous, multi-locus of alternative spaces around the globe and a digital platform for the expression and exchange of latent desires within contemporary art and architecture practices.

 

WorldWide Storefront is a mode of action; its aim is to unveil, produce and discuss experimental cultural works on a global scale from local points of view. By using the ability of contemporary means of communication to join space, undo place and avoid time, WorldWide Storefront provides leadership in imagining future modes of cultural production.

 

Storefront is seeking proposals from individuals or collectives across the globe with curatorial visions that articulate alternative positions within their particular context. Proposals should contain a two-month installation, series of exhibitions and/or events and identify a specific site where the project will be realized in relationship to the curatorial vision. Strong proposals will explore new spaces of cultural action that defy traditional notions of  “gallery,” “pavilion,” or “cultural institution.” Proposals should also propose new and innovative ways to digitally engage audiences globally.

 

All proposals will be reviewed by an international jury of notables in the fields of art and architecture.  Selected entries will be part of the WorldWide Storefront program and individuals will receive $1,000 in seed funding to start their project, as well as strategic outreach support and technical and logistical mentorship. From September 19 to November 21, 2014, all selected entries throughout the world will simultaneously open and have a two-month program of exhibitions and events. All events will be recorded and broadcast through the WorldWide Storefront online platform and presented at the Storefront for Art and Architecture Gallery in New York, which will operate as the central situation room.

 

For additional information and instruction on how to submit, please download the document on the right hand side of this page. All proposals must be received by January 31, 2014.

 

 

 

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

 

WORLDWIDE STOREFRONT AMBASSADORS 

[list in formation]


Nora Akawi

Lucinda Correia

Ceren Erdem

Pedro Gadanho

Beatrice Galilee

Urtzi Grau

Edgar Gonzalez

Rubén Hernández Fontana

Eric Ho

Steven Holl

Jens Holm

Juulia Kauste

Jan Kennis

Adrian Lahoud

Chus Martinez

Juergen Mayer H. 

Josiah McElheny

Mariana Pestana

Fernando Portal

Pedro Rivera

Emil Rodriguez Garabot

David Ross

Joel Sanders

Nato Thompson

Christine Tohme

Gregory Wessner

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