Cabaret Series: ha ha ha (The Funny, the Witty, and the Grotesque)

Tuesday February 14, 2017

Cabaret Series: ha ha ha (The Funny, the Witty, and the Grotesque)

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

7 – 9 pm

 

#funnywittygrotesque    #cabaretseries   @storefrontnyc

 

With Beverly Fre$h, Brian Hubble, Vivian Lee, Tucker Marder, Thom Moran, and Mike Perry

 

Laughter, giggles, grins, and smirks – actions that often originate as spontaneous and instinctive expressions of amusement – create a sense of self-awareness. That which we find funny can be genuinely ground-breaking, changing people’s perspectives by signaling common spaces of understanding.

 

Humor is a subversion of conventions. Seldom the focus in dominant discourses of art, design, and architecture, there is a recurring interest in the explorations of irony, satire, and the grotesque as a means of critique of the status quo. Humor has a unique and particular potency in responding to turbulent political moments. It can deflect anger, serve as therapy in the face of traumatic events, and undermine prevailing ideologies. Can humor also promote new forms of a more optimistic practice, able to overcome anger, yet effective enough to produce change?

 

Presented during Paranoia Man in a Rat Fink Room, an installation by Freeman & Lowe, Cabaret Series: ha ha ha (The Funny, the Witty, and the Grotesque) invites artists, architects, designers, and curators to explore the intersections between humor, art, and architecture through performance and discussion.

 

About the Cabaret Series:

Each iteration of Storefront’s Cabaret Series develops modes of expression that engage with contemporary discourses in a playful and humorous manner. The events have the aim to produce new modes of communication between speakers, performers, and spectators through provocation, seduction, and immediacy.

 

About the Participants

 

Beverly Fre$h has broken several Guinness Book World Records; including breaking the most eggs on his head and compiling the tallest stack of rap tapes. Beverly has exhibited throughout the US and internationally, including China, Japan, Peru, Poland, Ukraine, Czech Republic, France and Germany. Recent exhibitions include, MR MDWST – A REAL GOOD TIME (2015), a solo exhibition at the Cranbrook Museum of Art. He is co-founder of sUPERIORbelly, a record label based in Detroit; cofounder of WILD AMERICAN DOGS; and co-founder of the Archive of Midwestern Culture. He is an Associate Professor and Area Head of Graphic Art at DePaul University in Chicago.

 

Brian Hubble lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.  Recent exhibitions include MOCA in Los Angeles, Fastnet in Brooklyn, and Less is More Projects in Paris and Brussels. He is the co-director of Unisex Salon, an artist-run contributive platform for voices of the multi-disciplinary community. Hubble completed his MFA at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he was the recipient of the William Merchant R. French Fellowship.

 

WH Vivian Lee is the co-founder of LAMAS, a studio that is currently really excited by ornament, optical illusions, and lazy forms. Together with her partner James Macgillivray, they have experimented on these topics through school research, in temporary installations, and on permanent buildings. Lee is a U.S. registered architect who lives in Toronto.

 

Tucker Marder is an artist, filmmaker and plantsman. He has collaborated with institutions such as The National Aviary, The Nature Conservancy and Phipps Conservatory. Tucker is a recipient of the Frank Ratchye Grant for Art at the Frontier and in 2016 was named a Redford Center Grant Honoree. Tucker’s performance “STAMPEDE!”, comprised of over 200 live Crested Runner Ducks and large motorized abstract puppets premiered as part of the 2015 Parrish Road Show. Tucker is the founder of the Folly Tree Arboretum, a collection of over 175 rare and unusual trees intent on showcasing nature’s sense of humor. Tucker received his MFA from Carnegie Mellon University.

 

Thom Moran is an American architect, designer, and educator. He joined the University of Michigan’s Taubman College as the 2009-2010 Muschenheim Fellow where he is currently an assistant professor. Humor and lightheartedness are at the center of his practice, which involves solo projects and several ongoing collaborations that each explore particular issues. THING THING is a Detroit-based design collaborative that makes things with plastic, using novel fabrication methods to hijack post-consumer material ecologies. With Meredith Miller he works on an architectural scale, exploring media and environment as sources for multiple, simultaneous effects. Thom and Michael Savona collect designs that engage the relationship between people, interiors, and objects at Frontieriors.

 

Mike Perry is an artist, animator, creative director, brand consultant, poet, and designer. His work encompasses paintings, drawings, sculptures, art installations, books, murals, all of which are made to conjure that feeling of soul-soaring you have when you stare into distant galaxies on a dark night, when you go on long journeys into the imagination, when you laugh and can’t stop laughing. Key to Mike’s working method is the recognition that art and objects, go through many iterations—discoveries, coverings, uncoverings—until they’re finished; people do the same until they are fully revealed. He likes to cultivate collectives of celebration, exhibition, and revelation.

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; Tishman Speyer; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

   

Cabaret Series: Old Methods for New Wars

Tuesday February 7, 2017

 

Cabaret Series: Old Methods for New Wars

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

7 – 9 pm

 

#oldmethodsnewwars    #cabaretseries   @storefrontnyc

 

With A.Bandit, Mahdi Gilbert, Matt Holtzclaw, Wally Ingram, Noah Levine, Prakash Puru, and special guests

 

We begin the year in a time of heightened crisis, a moment of contradiction during which our belief systems about the world are being challenged daily. Today, more than ever before, there is a need to explore the paradoxical, to be present while being invisible, and to escape while infiltrating.

 

Letters from Prison,” Antonio Gramsci’s seminal work, presented to the world an understanding of the conflicted and complex functions of cultural hegemony, and was a critical tool for freedom that was created in a moment of confinement.

 

Cabaret Series: Old Methods for New Wars will present several magical performances as metaphorical “letters from prison.” The performances demonstrate the power of magic as a tool to understand the nature of transformation, freedom, and ultimately, hope.

 

This special evening, conceived of by A.BANDIT, will bring together dialogue and magic, with performances from some of the most noteworthy magicians in the field.

 

About the Cabaret Series:

Each iteration of Storefront’s Cabaret Series develops modes of expression that engage with the social, political, and physical space of Storefront in a playful and humorous manner. The events aim to produce new modes of communication between speakers, performers, and spectators through provocation, seduction, and immediacy.

 

About A.Bandit:

A.Bandit is an experimental performance art group started by conceptual artist Glenn Kaino and conceptual magician Derek DelGaudio. Formed as an alliance with the intention of creating a new performative medium between the worlds of art and magic, A.Bandit has performed their spectacular psycho-spatial interventions at such venues as The Kitchen, NYC; The Geffen Playhouse, Los Angeles; Pershing Square Signature Center, NYC; Soho House, Los Angeles; Art LA Contemporary in Santa Monica; and LAXART Annex in Hollywood, where they have taken residence for six months opening up what they called a conceptual magic shop called ‘The Space Between.” Their first artist monogram will come out this year from Prestel/Delmonico, and their most recent production “In & Of Itself” just finished a 16-week sold out run at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles and is coming to New York in Spring 2017.

 

Follow the links below for more information about the participants:

A.Bandit

Mahdi Gilbert

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

   

Drawing Series: A Line

Wednesday January 25, 2017

Drawing Series: A Line

Wednesday, January 25th, 2017

7 – 9 pm

FXFOWLE

22 West 19th St, 11th Floor, New York, NY

 

#aline    #fastbuildings   #drawingseries    

 

With Koray Duman, Michael Manfredi, Sandro MarpilleroMargery Perlmutter, and Charles Renfro

 

What constitutes a line? A vector, a division, a labyrinth, a world?

On the occasion of the closing of Fast Buildings, Storefront presented Drawing Series: A Line. The program invited participants to draw a single, continuous line for seven minutes while articulating the ideas behind their drawing decisions.

 

Fast Buildings was a pop-up show at FXFOWLE’s gallery space that presented works from recent iterations of Storefront’s drawing show, including Aesthetics / Anesthetics (2012), POP: Protocols Obsessions Positions (2013), Measure (2015), and Sharing Models (2016). The drawing show invited a select group of participants to interrogate the architectural drawing, using Storefront’s gallery space or the island of Manhattan as a site to explore and reflect upon specific topics—from aesthetic clichés to disciplinary obsessions to data visualization—in order to present innovative architectural ideas.

 

A Line was part of Storefront’s Drawing Series in which scholars and practitioners engage in the simultaneous acts of narration and drawing, using tools that range from pen and paper to digital devices. The events invoke a discussion around the relationship between modes of production and their representation. A real-time video feed of the drawing process records and displays the performance for the audience.

 

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

   

Salon Series: Urban Data Operations

Wednesday January 18, 2017

Salon Series: Urban Data Operations  

Wednesday, January 18th, 2017

– 9 pm

 

 

#storefrontseries     #salonseries     #urbandataoperations     @storefrontnyc

 

With Geoff Manaugh and Nicholas de Monchaux

 

As the contemporary city is increasingly and massively quantified, visualized, and analyzed, untapped territories are revealed. Data visualization makes tangible urban spaces that may previously have been latent, challenging existing strategies of urban design and planning.


Two days before the inauguration of a president who has promoted his own role as a master rebuilder, Storefront’s Salon Series: Urban Data Operations brought together key thinkers and practitioners for an informal discussion around the agency of data driven micro-interventions in the development and understanding of the city.


The event presented Nicholas de Monchaux’s latest publication, Local Code: 3,659 Proposals About Data, Design, and the Nature of Cities, a compendium of designs for networked micro-interventions in American cities. The book served as a point of departure for a conversation about whether systems of information and infrastructure can serve those beyond their builders—or even how they can be built by those that they serve.

 

About the Book:

Local Code: 3,659 Proposals About Data, Design, & The Nature of Cities (Princeton Architectural Press) presents a collection of data-driven tools and design prototypes for understanding and transforming the physical, social, and ecological resilience of cities. Written by Nicholas de Monchaux, associate professor of architecture and urban design at UC Berkeley, the book arranges drawings of 3,659 digitally tailored interventions for vacant land in San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York City, and Venice, Italy. Critical essays offer essential links between these innovative design experiments and the seminal works of the urbanist Jane Jacobs, the artist Gordon Matta-Clark, and the digital mapping pioneer Howard Fisher, as well as the developing science of urban networks and complexity. Designed in collaboration with the Dutch information-design studio Catalogtree, and featuring a foreword by Keller Easterling, the book combines many thousands of drawings, images, and critical and historical texts into a complex and timely manifesto for 21st-century infrastructure and urbanism.

 

About the Salon Series:

Storefront’s Salon Series is a informal gathering at Storefront’s gallery space promoting dialogue connecting art and architecture to a series of contemporary issues. Each of these events are free and open to the public. Seating is available on a first come, first served basis, and members of Storefront can RSVP to reserve a seat. If you would like to become a member, please see here. To reserve your seat please contact us.

 

 

About the Participants

 

Geoff Manaugh:

Geoff Manaugh is author of A Burglar’s Guide to the City, about the relationship between crime and architectural design, as well as the long-running website BLDGBLOG. Manaugh is also the editor of Landscape Futures: Instruments, Devices and Architectural Inventions. Previously, he was senior editor of Dwell and a contributing editor at Wired UK, as well as director of Studio-X NYC, an urban think tank and event space at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation.

 

Nicholas de Monchaux:

Nicholas de Monchaux is associate professor of Architecture and Urban Design at UC Berkeley, where he is director of the Berkeley Center for New Media, and is a fellow of the American Academy in Rome. He is a partner in the Oakland-based architecture practice ModeM / Moll de Monchaux. De Monchaux’s first book, Spacesuit: Fashioning Apollo (MIT Press, 2011), was named a best book of the year on numerous design and technology lists. His design work has been exhibited internationally, at venues including SFMOMA, the MCA Chicago, the Venice Architecture Biennale, and the Lisbon Architecture Triennial.

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; Knippers Helbig; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Rockwell Group; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

   

Part III: Manifesto Series: The Sharing Movement

Tuesday November 22, 2016

Part III: Manifesto Series: The Sharing Movement

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016
7 – 9 pm
 
97 Kenmare St, New York, NY
 
 
#storefrontseries     #manifestoseries     #sharingmovement     @storefrontnyc     @seoulbiennale
 

With Emily Abruzzo, Elvira Barriga, Adam Frampton, Soik Jung, Jimenez Lai, Laura Y. Liu, Hyungmin Pai, and Alejandro Zaera-Polo

 

The expansion of non-stop processes of twenty-first-century capitalism has accelerated the proliferation of digital sharing platforms for the exchange of goods, information, and spaces. Today, apartments, cars, work-spaces, and all kinds of services can be exchanged, opening the possibilities for new understandings of the city. But the promises of the so-called “sharing economies” come along with controversies around the unequal consequences of such a process.

 

How design and architecture can adapt to the sharing urban transformation? How can the discipline of architecture stop lagging behind the new technologies industry for a life of sharing? How can the architect intervene in the different economic, legal, and design arguments provoked by the sharing market?

 

Part III – Manifesto Series: The Sharing Movement was the third installment of a series of events initiated by Storefront for Art and Architecture and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and now followed up with a collaboration with the Seoul Biennial of Architecture and Urbanism. The series brings together leading practitioners and scholars within the sharing movement to explore its spatial, social, public, and private consequences, many of which are changing the future of urban life.

 

 

 

 

About the Participants

 

Emily Abruzzo is a partner in Abruzzo Bodziak Architects, a New York based-practice with experience ranging from civic and cultural projects to homes, exhibitions, and research-based initiatives. ABA has been recognized by, among others, the Architectural League of New York (the 2010 Architectural League Prize for Young Architects and Designers), the AIA (New Practices New York 2012 and a 2013 AIA New York Design Award), Wallpaper Magazine (Architects Directory 2013: “The world’s best young practices”), and the New York City DDC (Design + Construction Excellence Program).

In addition to her practice, Ms. Abruzzo is a critic at the Yale School of Architecture, a founding editor and publisher of the book series 306090, a 2014 MacDowell Fellow, and a Fellow of the Forum and Institute for Urban Design. Ms. Abruzzo received a B.A. from Columbia University and an M.Arch. from Princeton University, where she also received a Certificate in Media and Modernity and was named a Fellow at The Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies.

 

Elvira Barriga is a Creative Director at Local Projects and heads the Department for Visual Experience Design. The Spanish Austrian blend has been practicing internationally for fifteen years at the intersection of experience design, culture, brands, and environments. She is always looking for powerful concepts that enrich our lives and environments with meaning, beauty, and surprise.

 

Elle was a Creative Director at Imprint Projects NYC and the Creative Director for the Brands and Environments team at Bruce Mau Design in Toronto. Prior to moving to North America she was a partner at Blotto Design, Berlin and a freelance Art Director for Meiré und Meiré, Berlin and taught typography and editorial design at the University of Arts in Berlin and at the University of Applied Sciences in Hamburg.

 

Adam Frampton is the Principal of Only If, a New York City-based design practice for architecture and urbanism. Only If was founded in 2013 and is currently engaged in a range of projects, from the design of a single-family housing prototype to larger-scale urban planning, research and speculation. Adam Frampton is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Columbia University GSAPP, and he previous worked for seven years as an Associate at OMA in Rotterdam and Hong Kong. He holds an M.Arch from Princeton University and is a registered architect in the Netherlands and the United States. His independent research on Hong Kong urbanism has been published as the co- authored Cities Without Ground: A Hong Kong Guidebook, which maps the city’s three- dimensional networks of pedestrian circulation and public space.

 

Jimenez Lai lived and worked in a desert shelter at Taliesin and resided in a shipping container at Atelier Van Lieshout on the piers of Rotterdam. In 2008, Lai founded Bureau Spectacular in Los Angeles, which imagines other worlds and engages the design of architecture through telling stories. Lai worked for various international offices, including OMA. Lai is widely exhibited and published around the world, including the MoMA-collected White Elephant. His first manifesto, Citizens of No Place, was published by Princeton Architectural Press with a grant from the Graham Foundation. Draft II of this book has been archived at the New Museum as a part of the show Younger Than Jesus. Lai has won various awards, including the Architectural League Prize for Young Architects and Debut Award at the Lisbon Triennale. Lai designed the Taiwan Pavilion at the 14th Venice Architectural Biennale, organized the Treatise exhibition and publication series at the Graham Foundation, and constructed a 52′ tall structure at the 2016 Coachella Valley Music Festival.

 

​Laura Y. Liu is Associate Professor of Global Studies & Geography at The New School. Her research focuses on community organizing, labor, migration, and urban development. She has written on the connection between geography and industry in the art exhibit Anne Wilson: Wind/Rewind/Weave (2011); the influence of digital technologies on urban space in Situated Technologies Pamphlets 7: From Mobile Playgrounds to Sweatshop City (2010, with Trebor Scholz); and the impact of September 11 on Chinatown (Indefensible Space, 2007, Ed. Michael Sorkin). Her articles have appeared in Urban Geography; Gender, Place, and Culture; and Social and Cultural Geography. She is writing a book, Sweatshop City,which looks at the continuing relevance of the sweatshop in New York City and other post-Fordist, globalized contexts. She holds a doctorate and master’s degree in Geography from Rutgers University, and a bachelor’s degree in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley.

 

Soik Jung is an urbanist and currently the director of Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism Division at Seoul Design Foundation. She studied Architecture in Yonsei University and received her Ph. D in Urbanism at Politecnico di Milano and Gwangju. After a wide range of design, architectural, urban design practices in Seoul, New York, Milan and Gwnagju, she has focused on urban communication projects – she was curator for the Governance Project for Great Hanoi, the Anyang Public Art Project 2010, the 4th Gwangju Design Biennale and the Culture Station Seoul 284; she also organized different urban pedagogy programmes as well as citizen programmes working with local institutions such as Haja Center, Daelim Museum.

 

Hyungmin Pai is an architectural historian, critic, and curator. He received his Ph.D. from the History, Theory, and Criticism program at MIT. Twice a Fulbright Scholar, he has taught at the Rhode Island School of Design and Washington University in St. Louis and was visiting scholar at MIT and London Metropolitan University. He is author of The Portfolio and the Diagram, Sensuous Plan: The Architecture of Seung H-Sang, and The Key Concepts of Korean Architecture. For the Venice Biennale, he was curator for the Korean Pavilion (2008, 2014), and a participant in the Common Pavilions project (2012). In 2014, the Korean Pavilion was awarded the Golden Lion for best national participa­tion. He was Visiting Director of the Asia Culture Center (2014–15) and Head Curator for the Gwangju Design Biennale (2010–11). He is presently a professor at the University of Seoul. He serves as a member of the Presidential Committee for the Hub City of Asian Culture, the Mayor’s Committee for the Future of Seoul, and is the chair of the Mokchon Architecture Archive.

 

Alejandro Zaera-Polo is an award-winning architect and a tenured professor at Princeton University. His career has consistently merged the practice of architecture with continued theoretical and academic engagement. He was trained at the Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura de Madrid (Hons), and holds a Master in Architecture from the Harvard GSD (with Distinction). He worked at OMA in Rotterdam (1991–93), prior to establishing FOA in 1993, and AZPML in 2011. He was the dean of Princeton School of Architecture (2012–14) and of the Berlage Institute in Rotterdam (2000–5). He was the inaugural recipient of the Norman Foster professorship at Yale University School of Architecture (2010–11), and has lectured widely and internationally at institutions such as the AA School, Columbia GSAPP, UCLA, and Yokohama University. His texts can be found in many professional publications such as El Croquis, Quaderns, A+U, Arch+, Log, AD and Harvard Design Magazine, and many of them are collected in The Sniper’s Log (2012).

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

  

Reading Images Series: Beyond the City  

Tuesday November 15, 2016

 

Reading Images Series: Beyond the City  

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016

7 – 9 pm

 

 

#storefrontseries     #readingimages     #beyondthecity     @storefrontnyc

 

With Bruno Carvalho, Felipe Correa, Catherine Seavitt, and Marion Weiss

 

Transnational projects for resource extraction have motivated the development of massive infrastructural corridors. The strategic siting of mining towns, petrochemical encampments, and industrial developments aims to integrate vast geographical and political entities. These experiments promise to advance economic development on a national scale, but their influence on regional and urban constructs tests the agency of architecture and planning at smaller scales.

 

Colossal projects like the Initiative for the Integration of Regional Infrastructure in South America (IIRSA), is one of the most ambitious transcontinental integration projects planned for South America, with the participation of twelve countries in the region. IIRSA serves as the point of departure for conversations about issues of territory, resource extraction urbanism, and transnational negotiations. What is the role of architecture in shaping territories defined by raw resources? How can architecture develop tools to operate beyond the bounds of the traditional metropolis?

 

Reading Images Series: Beyond the City invited a panel of architects and theorists to examine images of existing and projected urban settlements in the South American continent to reflect upon topics of knowledge transfer, Developmentalism, authorship, and territory.

 

Reading Images Series: Beyond the City was organized on the occasion of the launch of Beyond the City: Resource Extraction Urbanism in South America by Felipe Correa.

 

About the Book:

During the last decade, the South American continent has seen a strong push for transnational integration, initiated by the former Brazilian president Fernando Henrique Cardoso, who (with the endorsement of eleven other nations) spearheaded the Initiative for the Integration of Regional Infrastructure in South America (IIRSA), a comprehensive energy, transport, and communications network. The most aggressive transcontinental integration project ever planned for South America, the initiative systematically deploys ten east-west infrastructural corridors, enhancing economic development but raising important questions about the polarizing effect of pitting regional needs against the colossal processes of resource extraction.

 

 

Providing much-needed historical contextualization to IIRSA’s agenda, Beyond the City: Resource Extraction Urbanism in South America by Felipe Correa, ties together a series of spatial models and offers a survey of regional strategies in five case studies of often overlooked sites built outside traditional South American urban constructs.

 

Implementing the term “resource extraction urbanism,” Correa takes us from Brazil’s nineteenth-century regional capital city of Belo Horizonte to the experimental, circular, “temporary” city of Vila Piloto in Três Lagoas. In Chile, he surveys the mining town of María Elena. In Venezuela, he explores petrochemical encampments at Judibana and El Tablazo, as well as new industrial frontiers at Ciudad Guayana. The result is both a cautionary tale, bringing to light a history of societies that were “inscribed” and administered, and a perceptive examination of the agency of architecture and urban planning in shaping South American lives.

 

About the Author

Felipe Correa is a New York based Architect and Urbanist. He is currently Associate Professor and Director of the Urban Design Degree Program at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design. Correa is the author of multiple books including Beyond the City: Resource Extraction Urbanism in South America (University of Texas Press, 2016). In addition Correa is also the co-founder of Somatic Collaborative, a research based design practice, which focuses on a trans-scalar approach to architecture and urbanism. Somatic, has developed design projects and consultancies with the public and private sector in multiple cities and regions across the globe.

 

 

About the Participants

 

Bruno Carvalho:

Bruno Carvalho’s research and teaching interests range from the early modern period to the present, and include literature, culture, and the built environment, with emphasis in Latin American and Iberian contexts. He has published widely on topics related to poetry, film, architecture, cartography, city planning, environmental justice, race and racism. Carvalho’s Porous City: A Cultural History of Rio de Janeiro (2013) won the Brazilian Studies Association Roberto Reis Book Award in 2014. He is co-editor of O Livro de Tiradentes: Transmissão atlântica de ideias políticas no século XVIII (2013), Occupy All Streets: Olympic Urbanism and Contested Futures in Rio de Janeiro (2016), and Essays on Hilda Hilst: Between Brazil and World Literature (2017). Currently, he is working on two new books: the first is tentatively titled Partial Enlightenments: Race, Cities, and Nature in the Luso-Brazilian Eighteenth Century. The second, The Future Revisited, will examine how designers, writers and artists have imagined urban futures in Brazil. At Princeton he is Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese, co-director of the Princeton-Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism & the Humanities, and Associated Faculty in African American Studies, Architecture, Comparative Literature, Latin American Studies, and Urban Studies.

 

Catherine Seavitt:

Catherine Seavitt Nordenson is an Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture at the City College of New York and principal of Catherine Seavitt Studio, a practice integrating the design of landscape and infrastructure. A registered architect and landscape architect, she is a graduate of the Cooper Union and Princeton University, a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome, and a recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship for study in Brazil. Her research includes design adaptation to sea level rise in urban coastal environments, as well as the novel transformation of landscape restoration practices given the dynamics of climate change. She is also interested in the intersection of political power, environmental activism, and public health, particularly as seen through both the design of public space and the written word. Her current work on the depositions of the Brazilian landscape architect Roberto Burle Marx, delivered during his tenure as cultural counselor during the military dictatorship in Brazil, examines this narrative of cultural construction, environmental conservation, and nationalist political power. Seavitt Nordenson’s forthcoming book with the University of Texas Press examines Burle Marx’s early didactic public parks as well as his role as advisor to the military regime in Brazil from 1966-1974.

 

Marion Weiss:

Marion Weiss is the Graham Chair Professor of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Design and the co-founder of WEISS/MANFREDI Architecture/Landscape/Urbanism, a multidisciplinary design practice based in New York City known for the dynamic integration of architecture, art, infrastructure, and landscape. Noted projects include the Olympic Sculpture Park, Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s Visitor Center, Barnard’s Diana Center, and Penn’s Center for Nanotechnology. Current projects include the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi and a research and development hub for Cornell Tech’s groundbreaking new campus on Roosevelt Island in New York City.

Weiss has also taught design studios at Harvard University, Cornell University, and was the EeroSaarinen Visiting Professor at Yale University. She has been honored with the Academy Award for Architecture from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Architectural League’s Emerging Voices Award, Harvard’s International VR Green Urban Design Award, the New York AIA Gold Medal of Honor, and her work has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, the Venice Architecture Biennale, the Louvre, and the Guggenheim Museum. Weiss received her Master of Architecture at Yale University. She is a fellow of the AIA and a National Academy inductee.

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

 

   

Definition Series: Secrets

Tuesday October 18, 2016

Definition Series: Secrets

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

7 – 9 pm

97 Kenmare St, New York, NY

 

#storefrontseries     #definitionseries     #Secrets     @storefrontnyc

 

With Jesse Connuck, Kaarina Gould, Daniel Perlin, Aamu Song & Johan Olin, and Troy Conrad Therrien

 

Today subjectivity has become a technical construction; the contemporary subject is defined as an owner of a set of passwords that only he or she knows. The contemporary subject is primarily a keeper of a secret.

Boris Groys, Cosmic Anxiety

 

As access to information becomes increasingly ubiquitous across spaces of culture and industry, certain questions remain: what is, or should be, a secret? What are the tools for finding, revealing, or making that special information accessible? To the beholder: when should a secret be revealed, or why should it not? To the investigator: what should one do with a secret once it is discovered?

 

Definition Series: Secrets invites participants to define the implications and processes of disclosure within contemporary forms of secrecy and restriction. From embodied knowledge of specific skills inherited through teacher-apprentice structures, to open source technologies and litigation of intellectual property, secrets are held, cloaked, revealed, divulged, leaked, and sometimes freely shared.

 

Definition Series: Secrets takes as its point of departure a long-term project called “Salakauppa” (interpreted from Finnish as “secret shop”). The project has been developed by COMPANY, a Finnish-Korean artist/designer duo. Traveling to outmoded manufacturing sites around the world to learn crafting processes unique to particular industries, the duo collaborates with a variety of communities to rethink its own processes and knowledge, and to produce new designs.

 

As the world’s resources continue to be threatened, depleted, and destroyed, new sustainable solutions and imaginative approaches are needed. As part of IDEAS CITY 2013, Definition Series: On Capital encouraged intensive examination of surplus resources that may be under-recognized or underutilized, rather than focusing on deficits. Definitions Series: Secrets pushes this investigation forward by exploring latent, hidden, and/or veiled information that may help lead to a more productive society.

About the Book:

The Book of Secrets by COMPANY (Aamu Song & Johan Olin), 2016.

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

   

Reading Images Series: Democracy

Tuesday August 30, 2016

Reading Images Series: Democracy

Tuesday, August 30th, 2016

– 9 pm

97 Kenmare St, New York, NY

 

#storefrontseries     #ReadingImages     #Democracy     @storefrontnyc

 

Participants: Max Cohen de LaraJames Graham, Michael Manfredi, David Mulder van der Vegt, Mark Rakatansky, and Malkit Shoshan
 
The relationship between politics and architecture is a complex one. The agency of architecture is often grounded in the symbolic and performative qualities of form, and its political power lies in the way these qualities produce and reproduce specific values, meanings, and uses.
 
In the spaces that house parliament, politics takes shape. Within the architectures of these structures, officials congregate, collective decisions are formed, and relationships between political actors emerge.
 
How do the spaces, settings, and structures designed for political assembly impact decision-making practices? How do they characterize the nuances in our political systems?
  
Reading Images Series: Democracy invited us to explore the plenary halls of the parliaments of the 193 United Nations member states on the occasion of the launch of the book Parliament by XML.
 
Participants traced differences and similarities between cultures of assembly, and made visible the symbolic and performative underpinnings of their architectures. In exploring these deliberative spaces, they questioned the role architecture can play in rethinking our models of collectivity, and in provoking the politics of our time.
 

 
About Parliament

Since 2010, XML has researched and documented spaces of political congregation around the world. Organized as a lexicon, the book allows comparison of all 193 national parliaments in the world. Similar to a manual archive, the book documents the rooms in the same style and scale, and also provides key data and the assembly hall’s location within the larger parliament building. Comparing settings between East and West, North and South, democratic and authoritarian regimes, Parliament addresses the plenary hall of parliaments as more than mere ornamental, symbolic representation of national values, understanding them as active agents in shaping political culture and the future of our societies. Research associated with the book has been exhibited as part of the Venice Architecture Biennale (2014) and the Guangzhou Triennial (2015).

In parallel to the book, XML has launched www.parliamentbook.com to build upon the architectural typologies presented in Parliament. The website offers virtual 360-degree views of the interiors of various parliaments that were visited and documented as part of the research.

 

Participants

 

James Graham is the Director of Publications at Columbia GSAPP, where he is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor. He directs the Columbia Books on Architecture and the City imprint, for which he has edited or co-edited a number of volumes, including Climates: Architecture and the Planetary Imaginary (2016) and 2000+: The Urgencies of Architectural Theory (2015). In 2014, he founded the Avery Review, a digital periodical of critical essays on architecture. His own scholarly work has been published in Grey Room, AA Files, Manifest and JSAH, among other journals. He also has degrees in architecture from MIT and the University of Virginia, and is a registered architect.

 

Michael A. Manfredi is the co-founder of WEISS/MANFREDI Architecture/Landscape/Urbanism, a multidisciplinary design practice based in New York City that is at the forefront of architectural design practices that are redefining the relationships between architecture, landscape, infrastructure, and art. His firm’s award-winning projects include the Olympic Sculpture Park, University of Pennsylvania’s Nanotechnology Center, Barnard College’s Diana Center, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center, and, currently, a corporate co-location building at Cornell Tech’s new campus in New York City and the US Embassy in New Delhi, India. Manfredi is a National Academy inductee and has been honored with the Academy Award for Architecture from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Architectural League’s Emerging Voices Award, Harvard’s International VR Green Urban Design Award, and the New York AIA Gold Medal of Honor.  He is currently a Senior Design Critic at Harvard and has also taught design studios at Yale as the Eero Saarinen Visiting Professor, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, and Cornell.

 

Mark Rakatansky is Adjunct Associate Professor of Architecture at Columbia GSAPP and principal of Mark Rakatansky Studio. He is the author of Tectonic Acts of Desire and Doubt (Architectural Association, 2012). Other recent publications and interviews include “Palladio and Eisenman Redux: Outside-In,” in Constructs (YSoA, 2016) “Mark Rakatansky, Mark Rakatansky Studio,” Conversation with the Editors, in Project (2015); “Mark Rakatansky” in Form, Idea, Resonance: Thirty Years of Architectural League Emerging Voices (PAP, 2015); and “The Transformations of Giulio Romano” in Giulio Romano e l’arte del Cinquecento (Franco Cosimo Panini Editore, 2014). Current and recently completed projects include a cluster housing project, a townhouse, and the residence Permana in Jakarta.

 

Malkit Shoshan is the founder of FAST, The Foundation for Achieving Seamless Territory. Her work explores the relationship between architecture, politics, and human rights. She is the author of the award-winning book Atlas of Conflict, Israel-Palestine (Uitgeverij 010, 2010), and co-author of Village (Damiani Editore, 2014). Currently, she is the curator of BLUE: Architecture of UN peacekeeping missions, the Dutch entry to the Venice Architecture Biennale. Malkit studied architecture at the Technion (Israel), and the IUAV (Italy). She is a Ph.D. candidate at the Delft University of Technology. Her dissertation explores the role architecture can have in conflict areas, focusing on UN missions. 

 

XML is led by two partners, David Mulder van der Vegt and Max Cohen de Lara who founded the office in 2008. Along side of their architectural practice they have taught at Delft University of Technology, the Academy of Architecture Amsterdam and at the Dessau Institute of Architecture. Currently, both partners are founders and directors of the two year Master Program ‘Designing Democracy’ at the Sandberg Institute in Amsterdam.

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

 

   

Reading Images: Incidents of Travel

Thursday September 8, 2016

Reading Images: Incidents of Travel

Viewing Room: The Catherwood Project

 

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

 8:30 pm

Storefront for Art and Architecture

97 Kenmare St, New York, NY

 

#storefrontseries     #ReadingImages     #IncidentsofTravel     @storefrontnyc

 

On View

4:00 to 8:30 pm

Leandro Katz, The Catherwood Project (1985–1993)

 

Discussion

7 to 8 pm

Participants: Julia Herzberg, David Shapiro, Eugenie Tsai

Works By: Frederick Catherwood and Lize Mogel with John Emerson

 

On Thursday September 8th from 4 to 8:30 pm, Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros and Storefront for Art and Architecture present Viewing Room, a one day installation of images at Storefront’s gallery space, showcasing a series of photographs from The Catherwood Project by Leandro Katz and the 1844 book of lithographs Views of Ancient Monuments in Central America, Chiapas and Yucatan by Frederick Catherwood.

 

From 7 to 8 pm, a Reading Images series will take place, featuring a program of presentations. Art historian Julia Herzberg, who organized an exhibition of Katz’s work a decade ago at El Museo del Barrio, will give context to the artist’s project; curator Eugenie Tsai will relate Robert Smithson’s Incidents of Mirror-Travel in the Yucatan (1969) to Katz’s project; poet David Shapiro will read from Incidents of Travel in Poetry (2016) by the late Frank Lima; and Lize Mogel (in collaboration with John Emerson) will provide a map of expeditions in the Maya region carried out by Katz, Stephens, and Catherwood.

 

This event is free and open to all. Refreshments will be served. Seating is available on a first come, first served basis. Storefront members can reserve seat a by contacting Andrew Emmet at ae@storefrontnews.org. For information about Storefront membership, see here or call 212.431.5795

 

About the Works

The illustrated publications documenting John Lloyd Stephens’ and Frederick Catherwood’s expeditions in the Maya region, undertaken from 1839 to 1842, caused a commotion during the nineteenth century. These have since inspired archeologists, historians and artists, as well as explorers and travelers of all walks of life, who have developed further work taking their cue from their predecessors’ itineraries, narratives, and images. One such case is the Argentinian artist Leandro Katz (b. 1938). Starting in 1984 and for the span of several years, Katz undertook numerous trips to Mexico and Central America, retracing and eventually completing the expedition itineraries of Stephens and Catherwood. His ensuing artwork, The Catherwood Project, dated 1985–1995, is a visual reconstruction of those expeditions, portraying an updated image of the ancient edifices first drawn by Catherwood, and, in the process, exploring the colonial gaze and postcolonial perspectives.

 

About Viewing Room

Viewing Room is a charted journey through some recent acquisitions of the contemporary art collection of Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (CPPC). It consists of a series of events in New York City in which a single artwork from the collection is put on display with an accompanying public program. Audiences are invited to experience seminal yet rarely seen artworks—in most cases, never before exhibited in the city—and to participate in programs designed to help discern the processes and contexts in which these were created. Co-presenting institutions of Viewing Room have included The Kitchen, SculptureCenter, and Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School in New York.

 

About Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

With offices in New York and Caracas, the mission of the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros is to enhance appreciation of the diversity, sophistication, and range of art from Latin America; advance scholarship of Latin American art; and promote excellence in visual-arts education. Its art collection is organized in five different sections: ethnographic (Orinoco), colonial, traveler-artists, modern, and contemporary.

This event is organized by the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (CPPC) and Storefront for Art and Architecture, in collaboration with Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy, curator of contemporary art at the CPPC, and with artist Alejandro Cesarco.

 

For press inquiries, please contact Jinny Khanduja at jk@storefrontnews.org or 212.431.5795.

 

Support

Storefront’s programming is made possible through general support from Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; KPF; MADWORKSHOP; ODA; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storefront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors.

 

This event is organized by the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (CPPC) and Storefront for Art and Architecture, in collaboration with Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy, curator of contemporary art at the CPPC, with artist Alejandro Cesarco.

 

 

 

 

CPPC_Lockup_7503 COLOR (2)

Cabaret Series: Textile Tests

Tuesday March 29, 2016

Tuesday, March 29 at 7 pm

Storefront for Art and Architecture

97 Kenmare Street, New York

 

Cabaret Series: Textile Tests examines the way in which textiles — through a variety of applications, scales, and techniques — participate in the making of both normative and experimental forms and spaces.

 

Storefront’s latest Cabaret Series brings together a group of architects, engineers, designers, and other experts, who will each deliver a presentation-performance focusing on a particular category of textiles. Participants will present objects, materials, and/or textile samples, and reflect upon the future of textiles in design.

 

Presentations will range from an academic-poetic soliloquy to a performance by a Brooklyn Ballet dancer in a technologically enhanced tutu.

 

Textile Categories / Participants

Introduction: Deborah Schneiderman and Alexa Griffith Winton

Layering: Deborah Schneiderman

3D Embroidery + Upholstery: Annie Coggan

Digital Manipulation: Igor Siddiqui

3D Printing: Francis Bitonti

Weaving: Isa Rodrigues

High Technology​: Leila Ligougne and Nick Vermeer

Surface Manipulation: Sarah Strauss

 

RSVP

This event is free and open to the public. If you are a Storefront member and would like to reserve a seat, you can RSVP here. If you would like to become a Storefront member, please see here.

 

About the Cabaret Series

Storefront’s Cabaret Series develops modes of expression that engage with contemporary discourse, engaging the audience and the social, political, and physical space of Storefront in a playful and humorous manner. The series aims to produce new modes of communication between speakers, performers, and spectators through provocation, seduction, and immediacy.

 

___________________

 

This event is presented in conjunction with the launch of Textile Technology and Design: From Interior Space to Outer Space, edited by Deborah Schneiderman and Alexa Griffith Winton.

 

Support for the event is provided by Parsons School of Constructed Environments, Pratt Institute School of Design, and Bloomsbury Academic.

 


Textile Technology and Design

Original Image by Allison Woods.

 

About the Book

Textile Technology and Design: From Interior Space to Outer Space (Bloomsbury Academic, 2016) addresses the critical role of the interior at the intersection of design and technology, with a range of interdisciplinary arguments by a wide range of contributors: from design practitioners to researchers and scholars to aerospace engineers. The book examines the way in which textiles and technology – while seemingly distinct – continually inform each other through their persistent overlapping of interests, and eventually coalesce in the practice of interior design.

Copies will be available for purchase at Storefront during the event

                      

About the Editors

Deborah Schneiderman is a Professor of Interior Design at Pratt Institute. She is also a registered architect and the principal and founder of deSc: architecture/design/research, a Brooklyn based research practice. Schneiderman’s scholarship and teaching explore the emerging fabricated interior environment and its materiality. Her research has been widely published, and, in addition to Textile Technology and Design: From Interior Space to Outer Space, includes the following books: Inside Prefab: the Ready-Made Interior (Princeton Architectural Press, 2012), The Prefab Bathroom: An Architectural History (McFarland, 2014) an architectural graphic novel style history (illustrated by Bishakh Som), and the edited volume Interiors Beyond Architecture (co-edited with Amy Campos, Routledge, 2017).

 

Alexa Griffith Winton is an independent design historian based in New York, where she is also visiting associate professor at Pratt Institute and on the interior design faculty at Parsons School of Constructed Environments. Her research investigates theories of the modern interior as well as the relationship between textiles and architecture in the mid-twentieth century. Her work has been published internationally. She has received grants from the Graham Foundation, the New York State Council on the Arts, the Center for Craft, Creativity and Research, and the Beverly Willis Foundation.